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Piazzolla

Discussion in 'Repertoire' started by pianolady, Mar 11, 2010.

  1. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    Monica, first of all, I hope your son is doing well? It seems they may have caught it in time if he's home after 36 hours. Even still, best wishes for a speedy recovery and hope he feels well soon!!!...

    What a kind gesture, I never knew that about PS. As for those 2 guys, they really wimped out! My answer is: Yes, I do. I'll have to learn the Fandango in sickness and in health, and for richer or poorer, ... :D Oh & BTW, diamonds last forever, so no need to worry about behavior since I don't have any issues with insecurity or ego. In fact, I joined PS because my teacher passed away 12 years ago, and I thought that musical camaraderie and criticism on recordings would provide the best motivation to improve my playing. As moderators, you and Chris have earned your trust with the entire forum through your integrity, honesty, and objectivity in evaluating recordings. I am thankful that I can post recordings (as infrequent as they may be) and get honest feedback from a lot of generous and knowledgeable pianists here. If it's good, great! If not, at least I'll know what to practice. Parting words on this subject from my teacher... "There are those who don't know that they don't know, and there are those who know that they don't know." I belong to the latter, as I am always trying to learn and find new ways to improve in every facet of life that I can.

    Thank you for the kind proposal, and I hope I can live up to learning the El Fandango de Candil...

    Whenever you get the chance, I am very curious on what you think about the new Piazzolla books?...

    In the meantime, I wish the entire family good health and much happiness...

    George
     
  2. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Thank you for that! He is doing well, now. The night when it all started was hard - he was in so much pain, so I rushed him to the emergency room and just a couple hours later he was up in surgery. As his mother, it was of course hard to see my 'baby' in distress. One funny little thing - it happened in the middle of the night and I was in such a hurry to get dressed that I had not realized I had put on two different gym shoes. It was three hours later when I was sitting in the waiting room and looked down at my feet and saw one white shoe and one gray shoe :oops: :lol:. But these days, an appendectomy is a lot easier; they make two holes on one side of the abdomen and go in with tubes and a scope, and then somehow the appendix comes out through a third hole on the other side of the abdomen. Not sure if I explained that right, but the whole thing is much less invasive than it used to be. Like all medical procedures these days. (Remember we talked about how we wished that we lived in earlier days when things were more romantic, yet we'd surely not like medical care in those times.)


    I've nothing to add here; I just really like what you said!

    Oooh, and even though I am so behind on practicing my other stuff, I couldn't wait and last night played through a couple of the Piazzolla tangos. My first impression is that they're great! I'm so excited and not sure I can hold off learning some of them all the way - right away!
     
  3. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    Absolutely, most GI procedures are not invasive as they used to be. After all the stress your family went through, I am glad your son is doing fine. :D You're right, modern medicine would be the only thing I'd take in my time capsule (pre Health Care Bill of course, as he will have had to wait in long lines for the same procedure).
    It's a good thing the Fashion Police were not on patrol that evening. However, under such circumstances, I don't think they would've cited you, maybe a warning at the most. :p

    I am glad that you like the Piazzolla tangos. Don't give in to temptation if you're working on other projects. :wink: Easier said than done, but the important thing is that you have them now and you'll learn them better with a clear conscience when it's the right time. I finally downloaded the Asturias and El Fandango de Candil last night. I was in the mood, so I also ordered several other Ernesto Lecuona books. Andalucia is the only suite I've played, and that was years ago. But, I am trying to resist the temptation myself as I am trying to finish my paperwork before I start practicing - YAWN! I peeked at the music too late last night... I already see several anomalies in the 2 scores on Asturias - Zoinks!... Oh well, that's for another day, another post...

    BTW, good luck on the project(s)! :)
     
  4. RSPIll

    RSPIll New Member

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    Monica,

    I too am glad that your son is doing well. Careful about those shoes, you may start a new fashion trend.

    I'm anxious to here some of your Pizza guy's music.

    Scott
     
  5. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Scott - Thank you for the kind words about my son. You and George are true gentlemen for saying things like that. I just want you both to know how much I appreciate it and respect you guys because of it. Also, Piazzolla, I mean, "Pizza guy" - that is so funny! :lol:

    George - Is your Goyescas ready yet? :lol: I do love that piece; now I'm singing it in my head. But whatever you do, don't try singing the 3rd movement of the Tempest when you're in the shower. I was doing that the other day - or trying to (it's really hard to sing! lol). Anyway, my son happened to hear me and said I sounded like a sick dog. :oops: :lol: But regarding Asturias - let me know if you need to look at another score: I can scan mine so you can see it if you want to check something. Lecuona - I am not too familiar with his music; I've only listened to some of it as I was putting up other members' recordings and that was a while ago so I don't remember it. Looking forward to hearing more from you when you get your books!

    But you know, the Piazzolla thing is wearing off a little now. I've played through several Tangos and although I was first excited when I played through them the first time, they are not holding my interest so much anymore. It's disappointing. Not sure if the music is not written well enough, or if I'm just hard to please. I'll still record a couple of them since I bought the books and all that. And maybe I'll put on a slinky black dress, high heels, and stick a rose in my mouth - perhaps that will re-ignite my interest in the music. :wink:
     
  6. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    If singing doesn't work in the shower, try to whistle instead, as long as you don't get water in your mouth. :p

    I am sorry to hear that the Piazzolla has lost his pizazz so soon. I wonder, are the pieces arranged, transcribed, or are they original?
    ... Mine and the audience's too! :wink: :lol: Seriously, I am going to look through some recordings this week and find some of his representative music and I'll send them as an attachment. If the novelty is wearing off now, don't worry, because you'll most likely come back to it in the future as I have rediscovered Ernesto Lecuona after 17 years. It was like love at first site as I listened to a recording that I had on my shelf for years. I'll try to learn and record Lecuona's pieces for the site, hopefully with a new "6S" that he deserves, (5S + 1 for Spanish flair).

    The anomalies in the 2 editions of the Asturias I downloaded drove me crazy on Friday, so I ended up learning the Asturias in the process over the weekend. I hope that's not grounds for a PS divorce? As my first Spanish piece in a long time, I thought the Fandango would take longer to learn. I hope the Fandango from IMSLP is authentic? That's next anyway as the other music won't arrive for another 3-4 weeks - Zoinks! I forgot to mention that I had also ordered the Suite Espagnola, Op. 47, edited by Isidor Philipp (International Music Company). Is that the edition you have?... I'll have to compare it to the downloaded 2 editions. I don't want to hijack your thread, so I'll post my Asturias issues on a separate thread.
     
  7. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    That would probably not be a problem. However, avoid whistling while eating dry biscuits.

    It happens sometime that you hear something and immediately think "I *must* play that". Only to find that once you get your hands on it, it is not as good as you thought (or maybe, you just can't make it sound as good as the guy on the radio did). Best to listen to things a couple of times, and let them sink in, before ordering the book.

    I think Piazolla's nice, if you like the style, but there is not so much musical substance to it. Also, he's overrated. Especially here, since our crown prince married his Argentinian girl Maxima, and our foremost bandoneon player played Piazolla at the wedding, and made Maxima cry. That was good footage... Now all you hear on the radio is Piazzolla tangos :roll:
     
  8. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    I don't think I will ever find that piece I heard on the radio that got me onto Piazzolla in the first place. It's actually very nice.

    But here is some important information: It's easier to whistle the 3rd mov't of the Tempest than it is to sing. I just tried it - maybe I'll make a new recording for the site! :lol:
     
  9. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    here I sit procrastinating and killing time watching Youtube videos, instead of practicing.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SR1a5VJq ... re=related

    I still love these guys. And George - it's not exactly Scent of a Woman, but I get some S's out of it. Maybe Bach people do too...
     
  10. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Monica, why not call the radio station and get the info from the director. Have the approximate date and time on hand. They may have a limited selection from Piazzolla, and if they're not sure they may give you a list of a few possibilities from their library, and you can simply identify the piece from there. There may also be a schedule online in calender form of that station. Good Luck!

    From WTC to tango?... Very amusing video! I would think one would have their hands full when dancing the tango, let alone playing the violin at the same time. That would be a good stunt for Tango Night! 8) :lol:
     
  11. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Hi George,
    I already know the name of the piece; the problem is finding it in print. Oh well....But just a moment ago I opened my Piazzolla books again and read through a piece that is pretty amazing. Actually, it's very sad - I think Piazzolla must have had a broken heart when he wrote it because it's one of the saddest pieces I've ever heard. I definitely want to learn it.

    p.s. get a video camera ready for that Tango party!
     
  12. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    The irony of sadness is that it can be sweet... George

    That's how I would describe nostalgia. I've often wondered why some of us find a therapeutic understanding in the voice of melancholy. It has nothing to do with unhappiness or solitude, but everything to do with inner peace found in nostalgia. I think it presents a frame of mind, that is based on compassion, understanding, and appreciation for a place, person, or time. It is an odyssey, search, or longing towards the feeling of "Home" and "Peace." The element of nostalgia in music represents a powerful message to convey, and if performed with deep understanding and communication, it has a captivating and hypnotic effect on the listener that could last for days. At least for me it does...

    Now you have me in suspense over this piece... You are probably busy with other projects, but I sense it will be worth the wait to have you play it for us when you get a chance...

    The other irony is that over the weekend, while I was searching for a piece to learn that didn't involve F-natural, (I am still waiting for my F-n agraffe to be fixed), I also discovered a very sad and nostalgic piece by a new composer for PS. Hopefully I can record it very soon...
     
  13. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    You better get working on the bio, George ! :D
     
  14. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Good one, George! That's a great sentiment - I like it a lot.

    And while I agree with how you correlate melancholy and nostalgia, when I feel sadness while playing certain pieces it is because I am actually thinking about a particular person - one who is alive and whom I wish I could see and be with but cannot. For me, that is safer and less sad than the alternative, but it's still sad enough to tug on my heartstrings, which then makes me get into the music and fantasize like crazy (which I can't help doing). But that also makes it so that I don't learn the piece that quickly because I forget what I just played since my mind was wandering and so I have to actually practice it longer before I get it down. Not sure all that makes sense. :oops: Basically, all it means is that it will be a few days before I can learn the Piazzolla piece well enough to record. :wink:

    However, you now have my interest piqued regarding the piece/composer you have discovered. Can you give us a little hint? I love guessing games. If not, then okay I guess we'll have to wait for your recording (so please hurry up :) ).
     
  15. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    It makes more sense than you might think... :wink: Therein lies the mysterious power of music. It's not uncommon to also relate to someone in musical terms. In other words, an individual can be an inspiration to conjure up the image of a particular piece of music. Perhaps, it's a trait that we musicians share? I've often wondered about that. I think it can apply in either direction: The music can inspire the person; Or the person can inspire the music. Music is the language of emotion, and you're right, it's very easy for emotions to get the better of us, even to the point of inhibiting the ability to play any longer and everything seems to come to a halt. Ah, music is the most wonderful, elusive, and unexplored frontier yet. You never know what's going to happen when you're at the piano. Sure beats "Movies on Demand," We'll call it "Music On Demand?" Indeed, the piano can be a vehicle liberating us from the blasé world we all live in and take us on a journey of our fancy every time we play...

    Speaking of play... It's GAME TIME on PS! The category is "Name That Composer?" - This 19th century composer was born on an island nation. He first studied piano from his father, then with Louis Moreau Gottschalk, and then went to study at the Paris Conservatory. Who is the composer of the nostalgic, melancholic, sad, but sweet piece?...

    I couldn't get this piece out of my head. I was sight reading the sheets of music even during my lunch hour this week. I can't explain with words why I am so enamored with this little piece. But, I'll let the recording be my voice and pen. I couldn't wait another 2 weeks to have the piano tuned, so I recorded the piece late last night. Fortunately, my piano doesn't go out of tune by much. I will refrain from posting the recording until after our little game on PS. :)
     
  16. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Oh George - I knew you were a fun guy! I have much to say, but I'm so very tired and can't keep my eyes open for one more minute. I'll respond to everything on the forum tomorrow. But for now I just want to put in my guess as to the 'mystery composer'. Is it Ignacio Cervantes?
     
  17. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    ...continuing from last night....

    I like that! And yes, my mind can wander when I play piano - however, I have to first know the notes pretty well. When I start a new piece, I don't 'wander' because I'm concentrating on working everything out. But when I'm able to play straight through, that's when the fantasizing kicks in. I suppose that makes sense. Is it like that with you? I wonder if other members here have wandering minds when they play, or do they just stay focused on playing the music all the time?
     
  18. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    :shock: :lol: (Sirens going off)... You have just hit the Daily Double!!!! (More sirens): Ignacio Cervantes is correct! :D 8)

    And yet, you came up with the name of a less known composer in such a frame of mind?! Wow Monica! You're amazing! Don't tell me you're in the "Amazing Business" too like Mr. Pacino? :) Thanks for livening me up to an otherwise bad day.

    It's like that with me when I improvise at the piano. If I wander, it's always toward a particular musical direction. I still have manuscripts from junior high and high school. In the last several years, I've been recording free improvisations since I no longer have any time to write ideas down. Recording improvisations at the piano has become my musical diary - all my thoughts, creativity, inspirations, aspirations are reflected in these little pieces... Someday when I retire, (hopefully sooner than later in life) I'd like to go back in time and "complete" them by turning them into compositions. On a rare occasion, I'll peak at these manuscripts, and their memories and inspirations seem to come alive again, as if it was just yesterday... See now, I wandering and fantasizing again..... :wink:

    Now that you have solved the mystery composer, I'll post it soon. If it's deemed worthy, I will gladly post a bio shortly thereafter...

    Oh, and thanks for coming out to play. I just may tickle you to play another game again on PS... :p
     
  19. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    A musical diary - that's interesting. I can't do that. I'm not creative enough. I can insert a personal feeling or emotion into an already written piece of music, but I can't actually make up a piece of music that fits my emotions. Unless pounding on the keyboard to match my frustrations could be considered a composition or improvisation? :lol:

    Ok good - I'm very curious to hear the piece!

    I love games! But please don't touch my sides and knees! :lol:
     
  20. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    That be nice. But this was really trivial... The very first Google match on "gottschalk pupil" gave it away.

    BTW, I did not read Cervantes took lessons from his father. More interestingly, he studied with Alkan in Paris. I'd love to have been a fly on the wall...
     

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