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Weird things on Ebay

Discussion in 'General' started by pianolady, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    I'm so bored today and so I just browsed around on Ebay, looking at piano-related things. There are so many goofy things that people sell! Here is one - you know those little coffee/tea creamers that you find on tables in restaurants? Well, here is just the top of one - the foil little piece that you pull off. It's got Chopin's picture on it.
     
  2. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    When I flew to Prague last fall I got this coffee creamer. I never knew before that Smetana is Czech for "cream".
    Maybe I should sell this on eBay.
     
  3. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    Interesting... Next time I'm at a cafe, I'll ask for some smetana for my coffee.
     
  4. richard66

    richard66 Richard Willmer Piano Society Artist

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    Smetana is not cream: it is SOUR cream and sour cream only. Having first seen the word in Russian, it was only later I realised it seems to exist in all Slavic languages as well as in Romanian. If anyone saw you take that picture they must have thought you were off your bean.

    Though ti be called "Mr. Cream" is not that bad, I am happy I have a surname that has no meaning!

    Here is some cream to you too! the "c" stands for "s" and the "H" for am "n"

    PS. As I was ataching this all the house shook: we have just had an earthquake!
     
  5. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Well apparently in the Chech Republic it does (also) mean coffee cream, which is definitely not sour (or should not be, hehe).
     
  6. richard66

    richard66 Richard Willmer Piano Society Artist

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    neither is sour cream sour. What is in a name?
     
  7. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    OMG, Richard, what was the magnitude? Is eveything okay?
     
  8. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    I missed that bit it seems. Any damage done ?
    We have regular "earthquakes" in some parts of the northern province of Holland, due to underground gas exploitation. Not a big deal so far, and nothing like the real stuff of course.
     
  9. richard66

    richard66 Richard Willmer Piano Society Artist

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    :D Thank you, all is fine!

    At the epicentre it was over 5. Unfortunately, for the journalists, nothing has happened and they are having to spin tales about "the panic". This must have been the fourth one I have been though. The one that wrecked Assisi woke me up in the middle of the night, though the one at Aquila did not travel so far.

    When my brother used to live in Santa Cruz, Ca, he used to say the same things.
     
  10. rainer

    rainer New Member

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    Had I discovered a few months earlier what smetana means, I would have been tempted to comment on the four-hand piano transcriptions from Ma Vlast which Chris and Andreas recorded recently, how well they brought out the creamy textures in the music. :roll:

    By the way, I find myself a little confused about how the composer's name should be pronounced. I had only ever heard it stressed on the first syllable, SME-ta-na. I know one has to be careful about what to believe when looking things up on wikipedia, but they seem to be contradicting themselves. Look him up there, and the first thing indicated in his entry is the pronunciation of his name. It is given both in written phonetic form (IPA) and as a short voice recording of two people speaking it, who are tacitly implied to be native speakers.

    The written version confirms stress is on the first syllable, and moreover a note in the page describing the Czech/Slovak-specific variant of IPA states that in these languages stress is always on the first syllable. But the recording clearly sounds like they are stressing the middle syllable, Sme-TA-na. What's going on :?:
     
  11. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    I found a couple more items just now...

    I guess when I'm real bored, I can spend time putting together a Chopin puzzle (weird!).
    The Chopin bored makes me laugh! I might have to buy it.
     
  12. richard66

    richard66 Richard Willmer Piano Society Artist

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    One word, different languages. In Czech (and possibly in Polish and other languages) it is SMEtana, but in Russian it is smeTAna.

    Now, look at Janacek, whose name is not JAnacek, but JaNAcek, as I was taught by a Czech gril I met once and who knew all there was to know about classical music. She confimed me the stress rule, as you mention, but said that was how his name was pronounced, But then he was not Czech, but Moravian and he was a Slovak speaker.
     
  13. pianoman342

    pianoman342 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Well isn't that an interesting doohickey?!

    I think the only people who could solve that Chopin Jigsaw puzzle are people who know the piece and can sightsing, to know which chord goes where in the score 8) or else you could put it together by the piano and play the chords one by one.. :p
     
  14. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    You could also sort of compose a new piece. That might be fun... :)
     
  15. RSPIll

    RSPIll New Member

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    I need the "Chopin Board". I DON'T need the puzzle. I have enough trouble putting together his music, let alone a puzzle of his music.

    Scott

    PS. We need a Facebook style "Like" for a post, which I would have done here.
     
  16. RSPIll

    RSPIll New Member

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    Like
     
  17. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    What?
     
  18. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    hahaha - just kidding. I get your 'like'.... :)
     
  19. rainer

    rainer New Member

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    Like aleatoric music.

    Aleatoric means random and is derived from the Latin for dice. The idea here of course is that the puzzle pieces would just be just stuck together at random from a mixed pile. Chances are this isn't actually possible because the edges are likely to be cut so that the shape of every piece is different and they will only fit together one way. Though it would be pretty cool if the pieces were designed to be of identical shape and contained one bar or so of music each.

    But did you know that Mozart wrote some literally aleatoric music? This was posthumously published in 1773 by Hummel and republished in 1798 by Simrock. I have a 1976 facsimile reprint of this 2nd edition. It is a recipe for "composing" simple waltzes without needing to have the slightest knowledge of harmony or composition and is almost like a game. It requires two dice.

    The aim is to generate an 8-bar minuet-like piece plus an 8-bar trio section. What Mozart did was to write 11 different versions of each of the 16 bars required, each version of one bar is a good fit with all versions of its neighbours. So he wrote 176 bars and gave each bar an ID number. Then he compiled two tables, one for the menuet and one for the trio, labelling the columns A to H in each case (to represent the 8 bars of the section). The rows were numbered 2 to 12, representing the 11 possible sums you can get by throwing two dice.

    So you throw the dice. Say you get 3 and 5, which makes 8. So you look up row 8 and column A to find an ID number. So for the first bar of your "customised" waltz, you just copy out the bar which has that number. Repeat the process for each of the other 15 bars and there's your finished product.

    It is easy to see that the number of different waltzes that you can "compose" this way is huge. There are over 214 million different minuets and the same number of trios, hence almost 46 quadrillion different complete pieces, or there would be if each bar's 11 versions really were all different, which is not quite the case. But there is still a plenty of variety.
     
  20. pianoman342

    pianoman342 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Yes, but would even a fraction of these "varieties" sound passable?! Sometimes I find myself slaving over just one little note in a chord for a long time. Or when I revisit a piece I just have to fix this or that. And I am by no means rolling a dice, I have an image in my head of how a piece will sound. I think Aleotoric "chance" music is interesting but when you compare a mathematically, (though with some variables left to chance) composed piece to a theme in variations, unless the math is very complex, the piece will just sound comical, or annoying, however you look at it.. :lol: whereas the t and v will sound spirited, the human element, more appealing given that the composer understands harmony and has just the right amount of "classical restraint" :lol:
     

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