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Tveitt - Hardanger Tunes 33,36,39,40

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by techneut, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Four more of these. The end is in sight now, but some tough nuts to crack yet.
    The Stringless Hardanger-Fiddle is a tale of an old fiddler whose strings are stolen by a devil. This occurred in a little Norwegian village called Hell (it's true, our pianist Knut-Erik Jensen was born there), and the song goes 'where in Hell will I find new strings', and ends with a repeated 'Damn it !!!' curse.
    I particularly like the Visiting Saturday' with its separate blocks of singing, first the girls (Jentena), then the boys (Gutane), then all together (Dei alle), and finally the girls again.
    The song about the boat needs a bit more work and I'll have to redo it.

    Tveitt - 50 Hardanger Tunes - 33: Tears and Laughter for a Boat ( 2:08 )
    Tveitt - 50 Hardanger Tunes - 36: The Stringless Hardanger-Fiddle ( 1:30 )
    Tveitt - 50 Hardanger Tunes - 39: Visiting Saturday in the Mountains ( 2:44 )
    Tveitt - 50 Hardanger Tunes - 40: The Lad with the Silver Buttons ( 0:36 )

    [Edit 25 july]
    Redone the 'boat' with far less slips and added two more:

    Tveitt - 50 Hardanger Tunes - 38: The Father of the Child ( 3:33 )
    Tveitt - 50 Hardanger Tunes - 41: Stave Church Chant ( 4:07 )

    The Stave Church Chant has two versions, an older, simpler version and a later, more elaborate version. As usual I have a problem of choice, so I did both in one track. This is the only one that I did not like in the orchestral version, but in the original piano version I love it.
     
  2. hyenal

    hyenal New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Chris. Frankly speaking it's the first time for me to listen to Tveitt, even though I knew you're working on this composer since a while :oops:
    In spite of my non-Tveitt-experience these recordings sound very solid, mature and of a certain degree of perfection (Bravo to the virtuose "boat" piece!). The stories about each piece are amazing and the music itself is also very attractive and seems to be truly telling stories.
    And I must add that I like the "damm-it" repeat :wink:
     
  3. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Nice job Mr. Chris. Surprisingly I cannot find the composer on IMSLP considering how mnay obscure and out-of-the-light composers the site hosts :shock:
     
  4. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Thank you Hye-Jin ! Of all my recordings on this site, it's the Tveitt ones I am most proud of - which is ironic as very few people seem to really appreciate this music. It might be a bit alien to people not familiar with (north-)European rural culture.
    The 'boat' piece is one that has still too many flaws.

    @juufa72: Though Tveitt was an extremely prolific composer, very little has been published. In fact the bulk of his work got lost when his (woorden) house, including all his (wooden) music cabinets, burned to ashes in 1970. This catastrophe left the composer a broken man and he lost the will to compose. I can't bear to think what riches could have been hidden in those cabinets. As for piano music, only these Hardanger tunes, some 2-, 3-, and 4-part inventions, one two sonatas, and one or two loose pieces survive, as well as 3 piano concerti (one reconstructed from parts) and a set of variations for two pianos and orchestra.
     

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