DONATION STATUS
Needed before 2016-12-31
$ 2,500
So far donated
$ 825

Tempo variation

Discussion in 'Technique' started by mike2aces, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. mike2aces

    mike2aces New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Society members:

    I am teaching myself Chopin's "Raindrops" prelude. I listen to recordings available online, (Horowitz, Rubenstein, Piano Society members, etc.), to guide me in my interpretation. Horowitz is my favorite.

    As I am getting close to mastering this piece and "making it my own" I would like your opinion on the following.

    I tend to pick up the tempo when I get to the C#m section. I think I change by 10% - 20%. When the D flat section returns, I tend to slow down, back to the original tempo, maybe even a bit slower.

    Is this an acceptable interpretation?

    Thanks...gotta go now and work on measures 59 - 75 .......
     
  2. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Messages:
    8,716
    Likes Received:
    1
    Last Name:
    Hart
    First Name:
    Monica
    Hello Mike,

    I think the middle section of the "Raindrop" should remain the same tempo as the outer sections. Also, I don't like the outer sections to drag. Just my opinion, though....

    Welcome to Piano Society! :)
     
  3. mike2aces

    mike2aces New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the reply Monica. I really enjoy your playing.
     
  4. musical-md

    musical-md Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Messages:
    1,250
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Physician
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX, USA
    Last Name:
    del Rio
    First Name:
    Eddy
    LOCATION:
    San Antonio, TX, USA
  5. mike2aces

    mike2aces New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the affirmation Dr. Eddy. I think, as Monica said, it is a matter of one's own interpretation of the music. I'm glad to know that some tempo latitude within a piece does exist.
     
  6. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Messages:
    8,716
    Likes Received:
    1
    Last Name:
    Hart
    First Name:
    Monica
    Thank you! :)
     
  7. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,149
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Chief Operating Officer, retired
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    Last Name:
    April
    First Name:
    David
    LOCATION:
    U.S.A.
    Hi mike,

    I've played this prelude so know it well.

    First, let me say that I think the most prevalent error in playing No. 15 is taking too fast a tempo in Part A and its later reprise. The faster it goes, the less the sostenuto effect to the ear. Also a more restrained tempo there brings out through the ostinato figuration the sense of a gentle rain falling on a gloomy day.

    As for Part B, Chopin himself gives no indication by using a tempo marking per se, nor does he place a direction there such as piu mosso or agitato. We all need to take note of that fact. In the Paderewski Edition, there is nothing written in the editorial board's commentary concerning measure 28 at the start of Part B, and their comments through measure 75 concern themselves with notational details only. Part B, of course, is more like a heavy squall in comparison to the opening gentle rain. It starts sotto voce but soon builds in tension and bombast with the crashing chords and octaves at the height of the storm. This in itself is an aural departure from the subdued and lyrical Part A, thereby creating its own drama.

    Having said that, some pianists do pick up the pace there. My own opinion is that if you choose to do so, it probably should not be a radical departure from Part A, but could certainly be enough of an increase in tempo so as to be noticeable and assist in the change of mood there, but not so much as to sever the connection to Part A and its reprise. Those thunderheads developed out of the very same clouds earlier producing the gentle rain. Had Chopin wanted an audacious change there, he certainly would have called for it. Thus, you'll need to meld your interpretation to take your desired liberty there, but also to serve the composer above all else.

    That's my 2 cents. :)

    David
     

Share This Page