Thank you to those who donated to Piano Society in 2017.

Tchaikovsky-Pletnev "Grand pas de deux" from &quot

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by Sandro Bisotti, Jan 4, 2009.

  1. Sandro Bisotti

    Sandro Bisotti New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Bisotti
    First Name:
    Sandro
    Mikhail Pletnev's arrangement of the "Grand pas de deux" from the second act of
    Tchaikovsky "Nutcracker". I adore this piece since the first time I heard it.
    I was about schocked and I decided immediately to study it.
    Maybe I'll play it better, but I hope someone already will apreciate this my work.
    Thank you for attention and all the best,
    Sandro

    Tchaikovsky - Nutcracker Suite - Grand pas-de-deux (Arr. Michail Pletnev) ( 10:39 )
     
  2. Nicole

    Nicole New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    167
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Piano Teacher
    Location:
    Canada
    Home Page:
    Last Name:
    Muller
    First Name:
    Nichole
    Hello Sandro

    This is very nice. You always play with such drama, and I enjoy your recordings immensely.

    And yes, Mikhail Pletnev certainly does some magical arrangements. I have a recording of his 2-piano version of Prokofiev's Cinderella Suite, and it is is mesmerizing. He is on one piano and Martha Argerich is on the other piano. At first, he was reluctant to make the written score public (I even contacted his people and begged) but now I see it is finally available for purchase. I imagine you would play that well too.
     
  3. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,152
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Chief Operating Officer, retired
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    Last Name:
    April
    First Name:
    David
    Hi Sandro,

    Wow! This is quite a piano arrangement. You play the piece with much passion, and it's obvious how very much you enjoy playing it. Some of it requires a virtuoso technique, which you provide. Toward the end with all the rapid arpeggiation, your earlier work on Chopin's "Ocean" Etude clearly paid off! The only suggestion I would respectfully make for your consideration would be to see if you can quiet the right hand a little more once the melody has shifted into the left hand, which then needs to dominate (in the first page for example). This is a really fine performance, Sandro. Very impressive. Bravo!

    P.S. Your piano is in tune and sounds wonderful too.

    Best regards,
    David
     
  4. Sandro Bisotti

    Sandro Bisotti New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Bisotti
    First Name:
    Sandro
    Too much kind as ever, thank you much and by heart. And I agree with your criticism: not easy
    (piano mechanism has to be perfect, plus a particular technique) but necessary to play more piano the arpeggios in the first two pages, while it's a choice to play with more decision and loudness from the third page. IMHO more difficult the control of tone and dynamics in these first bars than in the
    virtuositic pages near the end. There is a touching and wonderful rendition of this piece (both different and better than mine) here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnYszSuJ ... re=related

    Great pianism, especially the beginning.
    All the best,
    Sandro
     
  5. Sandro Bisotti

    Sandro Bisotti New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Bisotti
    First Name:
    Sandro
    Thank you Nicole, proud of your attention and commenting. Not easy but so fascinating this piece,
    really.
    All the best,
    Sandro
     
  6. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    2,387
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Obamanation, unfortunately...
    Last Name:
    Grocholski
    First Name:
    Julius
    Hoi,

    I searched IMSLP and could not find Pletnev! I wanted to follow along with the sheet music, but to no avail I couldn't. Regardless, your playing sounds confident and probably with few, if any, errors.

    Thank you for sharing.

    -JG

    p.s. I hope your next transcription will be Wagner-Liszt :wink:
     
  7. Sandro Bisotti

    Sandro Bisotti New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Bisotti
    First Name:
    Sandro
    Oh, great transcriptions, as from Mendelssohn, Schubert, other ones and from italian opera masters.
    I think to study (after the II Legend) the "Miserere" from Verdi Trovatore.
    This Pletnev work is not IMHO far from , as colour and writing, many of these Liszt's transcriptions.
    Please send me your e-mail, so I can do something for the score.
    Thank you and all the best,
    Sandro
     
  8. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    2,387
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Obamanation, unfortunately...
    Last Name:
    Grocholski
    First Name:
    Julius
    Looks like Mr. Techneut was the first to provide me the sheet music. Just in case for future recordings, and if I--or IMSLP-- don't have the sheet music, and if I ask for it, you can send me an email to: julius(dot)grocholski(at)gmail(dot)com . But most of the time people submit well-known pieces. Only on a few occasions does someone submit an oddball that I request sheet music to follow with.

    But thanks once again.
    -jg
     
  9. Mr Duffy

    Mr Duffy New Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    torino, italy
  10. Sandro Bisotti

    Sandro Bisotti New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Bisotti
    First Name:
    Sandro
  11. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    9,927
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Last Name:
    Breemer
    First Name:
    Chris
    A very impressive job and coingratulations for pulling off such a virtuoso piece so well. You must have worked very hard on it. I agree with David that the RH melody should stand out a bit more above the LH turmoil.
     
  12. Sandro Bisotti

    Sandro Bisotti New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Bisotti
    First Name:
    Sandro
    Too much kind Chris, thank you! Yes, it was (it is, now I will to correct the initial "voice-arpeggios" dynamics (difficult with those double arpeggios with one hand, difficult for my hands and my technique) and other things. I thought to not be able to play the more virtuosistic part, and the problems arrive from the (apparently) easier parts....
    All the best,
    Sandro.
     
  13. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,152
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Chief Operating Officer, retired
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    Last Name:
    April
    First Name:
    David
    Hi Sandro,

    When the right and left hands compete to be in the foreground (and we all encounter this difficulty at times), we often tend to put more emphasis on the hand that is supposed to be dominant. We turn up the volume there. So, for example, if the melody is in the left hand, to drown out the right hand, we add more emphasis to the left hand--but quite often without success. What happens is the the other hand still wants to compete, so grows in volume as well.

    The best approach is the opposite one. Using this same example of melody in the left hand, it works better not to increase volume in the left hand, but instead to focus on quieting the right hand, the one that should be in the background. This reverse thinking often does the trick! You might want to experiment with it. I hope this helps.

    David
     
  14. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    2,387
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Obamanation, unfortunately...
    Last Name:
    Grocholski
    First Name:
    Julius
    Ooo, David, how astute! :idea:
     
  15. Sandro Bisotti

    Sandro Bisotti New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Bisotti
    First Name:
    Sandro

    It seems obvious, but it is not, and it's really useful and interesting.
    The problem is also 1) with my not big hand I find difficult or impossible to play legato
    (starting to play with fingers already on their keys) these double arpeggios at r.h.
    To articulate these patterns playing pp is IMHO possible (to articulate yes, but with "equal choppy"
    fingers) but really difficult;
    2) the piano hammer action must have a great precision, and this is NOT the good side of my piano (if it has one, I hope yes).
    Thank you David and all the best,
    Sandro
     
  16. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,152
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Chief Operating Officer, retired
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    Last Name:
    April
    First Name:
    David
    Hi juufa,

    Some additional explanation:

    Resisting the quite natural and logical impulse to play the designated dominant hand louder, and instead intentionally quieting the subordinate hand, virtually always works. I admit it's certainly counterintuitive. One thing is for sure in such a situation though--"less is more" in achieving the desired effect. Here's what I believe happens: If you raise the volume of the dominant hand, then to preserve "balancing of the hands" the subordinate hand will naturally and actively adjust its volume higher too, thereby competing. However, by quieting the subordinate hand, the dominant hand simply continues to plays at its pre-existing volume, and the proper result is instantly achieved. So the solution in this situation is substracting, not adding. This is a "trick of the trade" :)

    David
     
  17. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    9,927
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Last Name:
    Breemer
    First Name:
    Chris
    This is up the site, filed under Tchaikovsky - Nutcracker Suite.
     

Share This Page