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STEINWAY PIANOS

Discussion in 'The Piano' started by jesus_loves_u, Jun 20, 2006.

  1. jesus_loves_u

    jesus_loves_u New Member

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    Are steinway pianos the best pianos in the world? How do Yamaha and Kawaii pianos compare to them? :roll:
     
  2. lol_nl

    lol_nl New Member

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    In my opinion, yes. Steinway are in general the best pianos in the world. But there are pianos which are more specific that can beat Steinway in specific things, like Sauter, Petrof, Estonia etc. just to mention a few. I think Yamaha and Kawai are the same type of piano as the Steinway (universal), but not that great quality. For the price, however, they are a bargain.
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    steinways are not bad. most responsive touch in the world, supposedly.

    yamaha is trashy. i broke 3 loops of strings in less than 365 days, juiced countless tuning pins, broke 1 spring, dislocated 1 centre-pin, made the tone go from mellow to harsh in a year, and loosened a few keys here and there. and made the low D slightly stuck.

    in my opinion, boesendorfer makes really hardy pianos. give them the right conditions, they're a machine. almost unbreakable.boesendorfers and faziolis have gigantic soundboards. fazioli got uber long piano :D 3 metres!

    stuart and sons also coming in. looks excellent. beautiful custom made pianos. i can go to their website for half a day and just listen to the beautiful music and drool.
     
  4. MindenBlues

    MindenBlues New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Quote:
    yamaha is trashy. i broke 3 loops of strings in less than 365 days, juiced countless tuning pins, broke 1 spring, dislocated 1 centre-pin, made the tone go from mellow to harsh in a year, and loosened a few keys here and there. and made the low D slightly stuck.


    burobbi, are you sure that your key touch is ok? What you wrote sounds so terrible that I would avoid letting you play on my piano, really...

    1. In my opinion, size does matters for grands (and uprights!). I would prefer a concert grand yamaha by far before a baby grand steinway, for instance.

    2. The quality of the action. There are good and bad ones. A new Renner action works wonder even on old grands, I know from own experience. Steinway provides Renner action, same seem to do some other manufacturers.

    3. The quality of the tone. Is there a long sustain for all keys or does the tone disappear fast? Is the sound too harsh, too mellow, can the sound color be changed through the dynamic ranges? For instance, on the treble strings there is an area the strings ring with double frequency on the bridge. If one hits the key and plugs this additional string area e.g. with a plectrum, one can compare if it rings with double frequency. If it is so, the sound will be enriched, if not, some piano tuners prefer to damp that area with felt instead having wolfes tones. Steinway grands are known for their crystal clear treble sound, maybe because the frame is excellent balanced for that.

    If I were in a position to choose a grand piano I would check above mentioned points, and not a certain brand, and not a certain age. Maybe one can save lot of money that way. At the end what counts is if one feels very comfortable while playing and if it sounds good and not that there is a certain brand label on the keboard flap!
     
  5. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    I bought my Yamaha C2 grand piano brand new six years ago, and I still love it. It has beautiful sound and I've never had a problem with it.
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    my piano is second hand, just a few years old, but reconditioned.

    perhaps i play too hard on my piano. for the past year i've been playing things like islamey, la campanella, rigoletto paraphrase, and trying things like don juan fantasy.

    most people do complain that i trash pianos much. sometimes i'm afraid to play too loud on a piano because i know i've broken strings before and i'm afraid to break other people's strings. so unless yours is a boesendorfer or a really heavy hardy piano, don't let me play those technical warhorses on it! :)

    but think of it, my piano might have been too light. i know a piano teacher in singapore, also a concert pianist- ong lip tat- he uses a boesendorfer WITH ADDED WEIGHTS :)
     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    For some reason a 6 foot Mason and Hamlin can sound better than a 9 foot Yamaha. Mason and Hamlin's have a very juicy tone quality unique to any piano I've ever played.

    One thing about Stienways is they have longevity... we use one to this day at our school from the 1930's and its one of the nicest in the fleet...

    Also it is a personal choice, jazz musicians tend to prefer the brilliance of the Yamaha... I personally find it hollow... yet Sviatoslav Richter preferred Yamaha and was an amazing classical pianist... I believe Marta Argerich used Yamaha as well... so its ultimately a personal choice...

    Avoid Chinese and Korean pianos however, for some reason when they come over seas they are no good.
     
  8. rachmaninoff

    rachmaninoff New Member Piano Society Artist

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    I have seen that freddy kempf playing on a yamaha and wibi C bechstein. I think they are all very well.

    I love boesendorfer. In my heart I feel something boiling if I hear the name boesendorfer
     
  9. jbwooten89

    jbwooten89 New Member

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    I just thought this was funny :D


    anyway.. I own a keyboard at my house that I practice on, and then I mess with pedals, etc at school on one of the pianos they have around there... my practicing is really weird... If i knew what the piano I like to play on was, though, I would tell you. It's really wonderful and when I press the keys, I don't really have to press too hard. However, no matter how hard I press, the sound kind of goes away pretty quick.. but I prefer it because I'm so far the only person in that damn school that can make it actually sound good.

    Just a question since we're talking about pianos..

    do they ever say "this piano brand is perfect for playing Chopin" or "This is the best Bach piano" or assign like.. you know.. like which pianos get a REALLY awesome effect from the music played?
     
  10. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    A 'Chopin piano' hehehe that would be nice.
    When I bought my Gaveau grand I was told it was especially suited to French music. Why that should be so has always eluded me (except that it is a French make of course). It sounds just as well in Rachmaninov and Bach although for Bach it should be a bit brighter and lighter.

    In the end though, it is probably the player rather than the piano making the difference.
     
  11. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    I remember reading that Chopin preferred Pleyel piano to anything else but he also liked Erard. The reasons were that when he was feeling weak, he played on the Erard because it had a ready tone (not sure what that means) maybe it's because it has a very light touch? He played Pleyel pianos when he really wanted to pour out his emotions and command the piano; make it do all that he asked of it. (which is a lot!) Anyway I hope I don't have this information mixed up. Can't find where I read that right now.

    Just another thought: When I am sitting at my piano, it sounds a certain way to me, but when someone else is playing and I am across the room, it sounds very different. Accoustics have a lot to do with the piano tone too.
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I've played on yamaha, kawai, and steinway, and I myst say steinway is far better than the other. True, its expensive, but what's brilliant about steinways is that the value rises year by year because steinway purposely does not produce enough pianos to meet market demand. That's why I play on a 1750's model m steinway.

    absolutely wonderful. rich, thick tone, with enough resistance to produce small, subtle tones perfect for impressionistic works.

    just for the record - steinways account for 93% of the world's leading concert halls. There must be a reason for this.
     
  13. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    1750's? Really? I didn't know Steinways were around then. :?
     
  14. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    woops meant 1950 steinway
     
  15. johnmar78

    johnmar78 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    I add weights behind the piano keys(yamaha g3) for last 15 years. Its around 10% heavier compared to full size grand. Even now days, my finger is strong so as my kids-they all trained on the same grand. When comes to stage, I have no worries to excute my reportories with ease. Of couse, gravity playing is the key point.
    For those, playing so hard that break the strings...by force. I can not imagine the sound they tried to project...

    Sound shoud be either melow(very close to the keys) or crisp but not harsh....

    Even now days, I against anyone "bang on the piano" or its just the wrong approach. We aimed to make music thru the piano but not to make "mechanical sound" that is HARSH, and unberable...

    Perhaps, you should write your own style " heavy metallica"....

    Sorry for the pianos who has been bashed. Pehaps you should use a hammer smash up all the keys.... or give the piano to me instead.

    Thans for reading and hopefuuly you are not taking this personal.


    John
     
  16. robert

    robert New Member Piano Society Artist

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    I have never broken a string (or anything else) on a piano/grand for my entire life. But my son did break a string on one of my pianos when he was 2 years old. Not because he banged the key, rather that it would break anytime anyway. But I know I do not play hard and never bang the keys. Still, I have never felt a problem with playing any grand while some have been pretty heavy. Cannot produce the sound of Horowitz though ;).
     
  17. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    How do you add weights? I've never heard of that. Is that a common practice? My Yamaha C2 grand has fairly stiff keys and I don't think my fingers could handle it if there were weights. And I would worry about the tendonitis in my wrists. But I am curious. If, as you say, it helped you to build finger strength, then it sounds like a good thing. I hope more people weigh in (pun intended) on this subject.

    I too have never broken a string on a piano. I can't even imagine the force it would take to do that. And I wonder what happens when a string breaks. If your piano lid is open like mine is all the time, does the string shoot out the top?
     
  18. MindenBlues

    MindenBlues New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Normal downweight is about 50 grams, measured on keytip with pushed sustain pedal. Difference between downweight and upweight should be as small as possible, about 20 grams.

    If someone puts additional weights in the keys, regardless on which side, on can reduce or enlarge the downweight. Unfortunately, the more weight, the less responsive will be the key. That means, the key cannot move that fast anymore. That results in a tenacious key feeling.

    If I would be used to play on such a heavy action, I would surely also have no worries with a heavy downweight on other pianos. But I would have trouble to play pianissimo. If I am used to push down 60 gram, that is another thing as beeing used to push down 50 gram!

    I don't think it is a good idea to play all the time on heavier actions. It will ruin the soft touch, and a soft touch is much more difficult to reach than hard playing, just my opinion.
     
  19. johnmar78

    johnmar78 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    good one, i didntb relealze you actually "measured" the weights. regarless of thye weight i added. I was comparsion the "actuall touch" of mine vs 250000$ full size grand when I was able to access the Town halls Grand. You are right about the touch of PP or ppp. Thats the whole point--"control of your touch". But again, if you know how ultrlize your free "gravity playing". You actatually can sense the keys at slow playing.

    Over doing the weights is BAD. I only add enoght weights that is just a friction heavier than the yamaha full size grand.
     
  20. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    What is the difference between Steinway Hamburg and Steinway New York? I know that here in the states Steinway Hamburg are sought after and sell very quickly. How about overseas does the Steinway New York model sell quicker than the Hamburg?
     

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