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Schubert / Liszt - "Ständchen"

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by Daniel Hoehr, Nov 29, 2013.

  1. Daniel Hoehr

    Daniel Hoehr New Member

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    Liszt's arrangement of Schubert's "Ständchen" from Schwanengesang.

    This was recorded in 2011 on a Schimmel concert grand. I hope you enjoy it and am looking forward to your feedback.

    Daniel

    Schubert/Liszt - Standchen (Serenade)
     
  2. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    Sounded nice, Daniel. I've put it on the site.
     
  3. troglodyte

    troglodyte Member Piano Society Artist

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    Steady pulse and beautiful singing melody, very idiomatic, and well managed at the parts where it sounds as if you have three hands! Thanks!
     
  4. StuKautsch

    StuKautsch Member Piano Society Artist

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    Wonderful grace notes and atmosphere. The pulse was generally very good, although it seemed there were two places in the first half of the piece where the pulse broke a little (on 'tuplets of some kind in the RH, when the number of notes per beat was increasing). Small matter in a piece of this length, though.

    BTW: I listen through speakers, not headphones, and the piano's sound was rich, with plenty of sonority.
     
  5. andrew

    andrew Member Piano Society Artist

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    One of Liszt's best Schubert transcriptions, and your playing is very nice. I have reservations about the opening bars before the melody enters. I know they are marked staccato in the rh, but I would interpret that as an indication of touch, rather than playing them in the completely detached way you choose. Still, Horowitz played it that way, and who am I to query?
     
  6. Daniel Hoehr

    Daniel Hoehr New Member

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    Thank you for your comments everybody and for putting it up on the site, Monica.

    I think the staccato imitates the sound of a finger-picked guitar, which is what Schubert may have had in mind. If I get this idea across, is a different question, though :)

    I have now listened to some random recordings of both the original Schubert lied and the Liszt arrangement and it seems that quite a few pianists avoid the staccato. However, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau's pianist doesn't and I find this interpretation quite convincing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn1jSZFaJyw.

    Many thanks again.

    Daniel
     
  7. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Excellent playing indeed, and good sound. I don't know the piece well enough to give detailed feedback but it sounded just fine to me.
     
  8. Daniel Hoehr

    Daniel Hoehr New Member

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    Thank you Chris.
     
  9. andrew

    andrew Member Piano Society Artist

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    The Fischer-Dieskau video made me aware of a subtle difference between the Liszt and Schubert versions. Schubert seems to have made no pedal indications; Liszt I believe tells you to pedal with each note. I presume that's to provide a little "body" of sustain to each note whilst maintaining a staccato touch. I suppose this is one of these things every pianist sees differently. Incidentally, I listened to Rachmaninov and for once I'll say something negative about his playing! His opening few bars seem to be all over the place. After that you only need a few moments to realise it's a great pianist playing.
     
  10. Daniel Hoehr

    Daniel Hoehr New Member

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    In fact, Liszt's pedal instruction is "Pedale à chaque Mesure", so you are quite right that the staccato seems to be a question of touch rather than playing the notes in a completely detached way. It's been more than two years since I last played this transcription but I seem to remember that I initially changed the pedal each bar but I found that it sounded too "massive" for my taste so my teacher at that time suggested playing the opening bars without pedal. Why I still used pedal on the last note of each bar, I don't know...

    On the other hand, I don't think that composer's pedal markings are always that terribly dogmatic. A mid-nineteenth century Erard grand piano had much less sustain and sound than a modern concert grand. Sometimes a composer's pedal markings may need to be "translated" for the instruments we have and that could also be the case here. I don't know. Once more a time machine would be handy :)
     

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