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Schoenberg, 3 pieces Op.11, Hector Sanchez - Piano

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by hectorjs, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. hectorjs

    hectorjs New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Occupation:
    Pianist. Chamber Music Professor, Conservatory of
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    Last Name:
    Sanchez
    First Name:
    Hector
    Hello again!
    I never had the chance to say thank you to all the people who wrote comments on the last pieces I uploaded, "La Vega" by Albeniz and The Chopin Mazurka. Sorry!! The last few weeks have been very busy, and I barely had time to connect to the internet. But thanks, everyone, for your warm comments! :D

    So, now, let's change the mood a little bit. I thought it would be interesting to give you some 20th century milestone music. Here are Schoenberg 3 piano pieces Op.11, as I recorded them a few years ago. I absolutely LOVE this music, but I would be very interested to see what you think of it :)

    I hope you enjoy them!
    All the best,

    Hector


    Schoenberg - Three Piano Pieces Op. 11 - no. 1
    Schoenberg - Three Piano Pieces Op. 11 - no. 2
    Schoenberg - Three Piano Pieces Op. 11 - no. 3
     
  2. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    It sounds like something my cats might play. But I'm sure you played it very nicely. :D
     
  3. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Ok - so I sat down, poured myself a glass of wine, put on the headphones and started working on putting up member's recordings. I will tell you that I have never before listened to Schoenberg. Also, that I usually don't like 'modern' music and go for more romantic style music. Now I have listened to all three of these pieces and all I know is that I certainly am not qualified to give any 'worthy' opinion about this music, other than to say that I think I will have weird dreams tonight because of it. The 3rd piece is especially scary - but I did like the 2nd one a little bit, the very end is really neat.

    I have recently played some music that I never thought I would like, but it grew on me and now I love it, too. So maybe that is what happens with music like this. (but I doubt it with this one- it's just too 'far out' for my taste) However, the pedaling sounds like it's quite a challenge, and your playing is expressive, so you must have played this well. Although I always think that one could play practically anything and an average listener would never know if it is right or wrong. See? I am not qualified or smart enough to understand this type of music. Sorry, but you asked for opinions. :wink:

    These are up on the site.
     
  4. demonic_advent

    demonic_advent New Member

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    Okay... I'm not a big fan of Schoenberg... actually, I kinda hate him... but that's besides the point.

    I tried listening to these three pieces...

    I liked the first one. It seemed very... un-Schoenbergian to me, for some reason. It actually reminded me a bit of late Scriabin. I thought it was very well played, but I can't really comment much, seeing as how I know next to nothing about how this music should be interpreted.

    The second one reminded me of late Scriabin as well. These works seem fairly far removed from the later works of Schoenber, I must say. I enjoyed this one as well. You played it very well, capturing the mysterious expressive qualities in the music. I was particularly impressed by the frequently recuring low bass notes, because it would be all to easy to just pound those out... but you did a great job maintaning the quiet, calm, mysterious mood.

    I've heard the third one before, and I've never liked it. However, it is obvious that you did a great job playing it, and you knew exactly what you were doing.

    So I would say that to my untrained ear, these sounded very good. I can't say much more about them though...
     
  5. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    The third one (which is actually the first one, which is why I listened to it first) was the only one I listened to. Since Monica and our demonic friend both seem to agree that's the...um...least pleasant one, then maybe I should have listened to a different one. :lol: But my connection is being stupid right now so I can't listen to anything. :roll: I've always disliked Schönberg, and the only reason I listened here is because I'm trying to be more open-minded about contemporary music lately, and out of that determination I've discovered that I actually like Shostakovich, who I always used to dislike intensely. In fact, I like Shostakovich a lot now that I've gotten started on him. But Shostakovich at least uses diatonic harmony, even though he uses modes other than ionian and aeolian and they're extensively ornamented with dissonance. Schönberg is just....waaay more out there...but when my internet gets better I'll give him another go. :D
     
  6. John Robson

    John Robson New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Schoenberg

    I admit to not being able to fully appreciate Schoenberg. However, "never say never" comes to my mind as I listen. I can feel the emotion in some sections. No. 2 was a little easier for me to appreciate because of the unifying repetitive LH accompaniment. I believe I would need to first learn to play these pieces before developing an appreciation for them. Perhaps some day I will. I've already discovered that learning to play a piece that seems quite strange can provide new insight and appreciation for the work.

    It sounds like you played them very well.
     
  7. hectorjs

    hectorjs New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Well, first of all, thanks to everyone for your sincere opinions!! It is very interesting for me to see what people with "untrained" ears think about this music... I totally understand the difficulty in listening to them. It is not easy even for professionals, when they confront it for the first time. It definitely takes time to grow into it. At the same time, I've always found it a bit puzzling that we still have such difficulties with music written almost 100 years ago... it shows how elitist contemporary music has become, that it doesn't even bother to explain itself to the average audience. But it also shows how "old-fashioned" our ears are, probably because general music education relies still too heavily on tonal music, and doesn't even attempt to combine it with other musical languages, and because the tonal language is "pounded" into our brain almost from birth, through all forms of popular, or "consumer's" music (rock, pop, etc.).
    I think there is true artistic value in this music, but in order for everyone to appreciate it, it would be necessary for everyone to make an effort: composers and performers, to program it more often, and make it more accesible: educators, to use a much larger mix of different languages in their teaching; and listeners, to make an effort and be willing to listen to it, like all of you did!
    So, congratulations to all of you who made the effort! :)
    And in exchange for your effort, I promise to post next time more "digestible" music :D
    all the best to everyone,
    Hector
     
  8. robert

    robert Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Our dear Schoenberg who tend to cause a lot arguments and discussion. The father of the 12-tone system (though someone claims to be ahead of him), smoked 60 cigarettes per day, drank 3 coffee pots (!!) per day, drank too much liquor and the single one who directed music into a new language. So much spit on in his early years and driven away from Germany to the United States where he never really fit in but still he dedicated his entire life to music. Nothing else seemed important to him and he has my entire respect for that.

    If there is a leading path in music history, Schoenberg can be connected backwards right to Bach who he admired a lot. The music is very calculated (as with Bach), almost mathematical (as with Bach) and includes many new elements on how to produce music (formulas). I also see connections to the contemporary Shostakovich even though Shosta never really believed in the 12-tone system.

    So, then it comes whether one like it or not, I believe is important is to let go of all barriers and just open your mind and take it all in. I also believe that reading a biography (there are short ones) of Schoenberg helps a lot in understanding his music.

    These three piano pieces of op.11 is actually one of the more easy listening set and a good start and you do a remarkable job presenting these Hector! Perfect in tone balance, dynamics and control. Extremely well done!
     

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