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Scarlatti 3 Sonatas K4 (gm), K9 (dm), K8 (gm)

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by leonald, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. leonald

    leonald Member Piano Society Artist

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    Tallinn, Estonia
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    Kaidja
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    Leonald
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  2. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    well played! I am not seasoned with Scarlatti's sonatas, due in part of the quantity that he composed, 550. It's not like memorizing Rachmaninov's nocturnes (3 only), there are so many Scarlatti sonatas that some of them sound the same. I hear confidence in your playing and I like it. I don't hear any major errors, or in fact, any slips. Nice. Now start working on the other 547 sonatas because some people here at pianosociety like to have complete recordings :wink: . -JG
     
  3. PJF

    PJF New Member Piano Society Artist

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    That was very nice. :D
     
  4. robert

    robert New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Really good recordings! Lovely phrasing and I like your use of dynamics. You seem to have a "rule" that whenever a short passage is repeated, first play it mf, then p[/p]. That makes it more interesting than just a normal reprise.
     

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