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recording duets

Discussion in 'Useful resources' started by pianolady, Jan 19, 2008.

  1. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    I didn't know where to put this exactly, but I'm wondering if any of you know who to record a duet with you playing both parts. I know how to record with my Edirol, of course. But I think you would have to record one part, and then have it playing back in your ears while you record the other part, right? Or do you just record them without playing back and hope you line up ok? That seems impossible, though. And if you do record the parts separately, can you then go onto your editing program (I use Wavepad) to put them on top of each other? What about recording one part, transferring it to a CD, playing the CD in a boom box next to the piano while you play the second part with the Edirol recording? Do you have any ideas? (or did any of that make sense?)
     
  2. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Yeah you'd have to record one part and play the second while you listen to the first on headphones. Then combine the two tracks in your editor. This is how Tom Pascale recorded his Schubert, and it is the only viable way really. There may be a posting where he explains that.
     
  3. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Or I can drive down to Chicagoland and record with you....but I am not promising quality :lol: :oops:

    As Mr. Techneut says, that way is the way to go. It will take a lot of work on your part to make sure you have the timing down pat! (and the piece memorized).

    Or you can ask your teacher to play. Craigslist? Maybe. With a city and the 'burbs of 3million plus I htink you can find someone.
     
  4. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Just out of curiosity, which piece are you wanting to record?
     
  5. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    Is it hard to combine tracks on editing programs? I guess I won't know until I try, right? I think the CD/boom box/play with playback recording/ recording is easier, though.

    Julius - come on down! I think we may be a whole 1 degree warmer than you are today. (It's freezing!)

    My teacher is having surgery and lessons are postponed for awhile. What about this idea? Is it possible to play duets where the players are not in the same place? ex. Player A and player B live far apart. Can each one record the part if they know the exact metronome setting and both have tuned pianos?
     
  6. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    It's a Barber duet.
     
  7. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Living far apart would be very hard. We're humans and for me 100bpm will be different than your 100bpm, for example. I could play 97 and you, 102. It would be a B---- to sync the two tracks together. What's even worse is that the pianos would have to sound the same (or close to) and the accustics of the room have to match (or close) because it will sound very odd when put together. (Also it will be harder for post-processing if there are many different variables--piano, bpm, accustics, etc.)

    But some good news, according to scientists, if we wait another billion years we might have four arms! That would solve lots of problems :wink: :lol:
     
  8. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    That I don't get. I know I am human, but isn't 100bpm on my metronome the same as on your metronome?
     
  9. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    The room for error is too great. I don't think it is possible to be 100% accurate, So my example of 97 to 102 is a bad example. It could be more like 99 to 101. What I am saying is that not everyone, myself in particular, is accurate with tempo.

    But I could be wrong.
     

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