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Puzzles, Jokes, Anecdotes, and Thoughts

Discussion in 'General' started by pianolady, Dec 14, 2007.

  1. robert

    robert Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Correct. Same trick as the boat and train riddle :D.
     
  2. robert

    robert Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Congratulations! Yes it's weird and the entire family is really weird. I am happy to not be raised there!
     
  3. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Raymond - can you post another one today?
     
  4. rsmullyan

    rsmullyan New Member Piano Society Artist

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    When I heard the puzzle of the unlisted phones,, I said that the answer is 169 ( which is 13 percent of 1300), but boy, was I wrong! The correct answer is zero, since the names were taken from the phone book! Yes Chris, you got it right!

    Speaking of statisticians, there is the story of the statistician who told a friend that he never took planes. When the friend asked him why, he replied that he computed the probability that there be a bomb on the plane, and although the probability was low, it was too high for his comfort. Well, a week later, the friend met the statistician on a plane and asked him why he changed his theory. The statistician replied: " I didn't change my theory. It's just that I subsequently computed the probability that there simultaneously be two bombs on the plane, and this is low enough for my own comfort, so now I simply carry my own bomb.

    OK--here is a good oldie: What happens when an irresistable canon ball hits an immovable post? By an irresistable cannon ball is meant one which knocks over anything it hits, and by an immovable post is meant one which nothing can knock over.And so what happens if such a cannon ball hits such a post?
     
  5. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Yeah nice thing. Bit more complicated than the classic wolf/cabbage/goat puzzle. Took me some experimenting until I figured there was only one possible way to start without getting stuck right away. I thought I'd blown my chances of a job in China... but maybe there is hope yet :lol:
     
  6. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Which proves that reading carefully is the first key to solving problems ;-)

    It seems impossible to predict, as there are a lot more choices than to knock over or not to knock over. If something can't be knocked over, it could still be pulverized. But I'd say that such a cannonball can not exist - or in any case could never be fired, as it would have to be as heavy as the earth, and would need a cannon heavier than that to be launched. The same dilemma applies to the immovable post.
     
  7. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    In theory something else will break / give way besides the cannon ball or post. But if that is not correct, then in reality two forces cannot meet at the same time, so one of them will give way. It's another play with words: If the ball cannot move the object, it was not irresistible. If the object gives way, then it was not immovable.
     
  8. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    First of all - I think Chris is doing nothing all day but watching the computer screen to see when Raymond comes on. Then he gets in there first with the answer. :lol: :lol: :lol:

    my answer - the world disappears.
     
  9. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Hahahaaa.. you got it. If you think before you speak, the other guy gets his joke in first. :lol:
     
  10. rsmullyan

    rsmullyan New Member Piano Society Artist

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    The answer is that it is logically impossible for an irresistible canon ball and an immovable post to BOTH exist, for if they did, you would have a logical contradiction. Either one alone could exist, but not both. They are what is called incompossible. I love Ambrose Bierce's definition of that word: " Unable to exist if something else exists. Two things are incompossible when the world of being has scope enough for one of them, but not enough for both--as Walt Whitman's poetry and God.s mercy to man". [ This definition is from his Devil's Dictionary--a wonderful book with such choice items as his definition of an egotist: One who is more interested in himself than in me.]
     
  11. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    And who says that logical contradictions can't exist ? :lol:

    I am not sure of that. It would be a bit like having an object that is bigger than ALL other objects. Makes me think of the hypothetical set of all sets...

    Anyway, by asking what would happen when the two collide, you imply that they do exist - so the question is not really fair.

    But I love the egotist definition :D
     
  12. rsmullyan

    rsmullyan New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Here is a very old puzzle which has inspired enormous controversy! People have argued about it for hours! Two answers are usually given; one right and one wrong. But the curious thing is that it is extremely difficult to convince the wrong person that he or she is wrong. It will be very interesting to see how you all will react to this! Here is the puzzle:

    A man cane across a friend looking at a portrait. When asked whose portrait it was, the friend answered : " Brothers and sisters have I none, but this man's father is my father's son"
    Whose portrait was he looking at?
     
  13. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Himself.
     
  14. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    I concur. :)
     
  15. rsmullyan

    rsmullyan New Member Piano Society Artist

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    So far, no one has it right! Maybe this will help: The speker din not say:
    " This MAN is my father's son" --he said; " This man's FATHER is my father's son".Does that make you change your mind, I hope!
     
  16. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Ok - I plugged in my husband Tom who actually does have two brothers, but I pretended that he doesn't. So, Tom is standing there looking at a portrait of someone he is related to. Ok - it can't be himself because he cannot be himself and also his father, right? (weird - I don't think that even makes sense - just brainstorming, here) It can't be a grandfather because that's going the wrong way. So I plugged in one of my sons, Bobby. Tom is standing there looking at his son, Bobby. But Bobby is Tom's son, not Tom's father's son. So that doesn't work. At least that's what I first thought. But...it does. The portrait is the man's son (or Bobby). Bobby's father (Tom) is his (Tom's father's) son. Is that right? If not, then I give up. This is probably one of those really tricky ones.
     
  17. rsmullyan

    rsmullyan New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Good girl.pianolady! You now have the righy answer, but it can be proved much more simply, which I will do in a posting.
    Raymond
     
  18. robert

    robert Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Bravo Monica! To simplify it a bit and work things out backwards (which is the trick of the sentence as the logic of the sentence is reversed).

    "my father's son." Must be either himself or a brother of his.
    "but this man's father" Must be his brother's son or his own son.
    "Brother or sisters I have none," no brother, so it must be his son.
     
  19. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    A friend of mine asked me that riddle once. I had to think about it a minute, but I answered it correctly. He was amazed, because everyone got it wrong, and even after he told them they were wrong, and explained it to them, they still insisted they were right. :lol:

    Reminds me of the "Let's Make a Deal" problem. Anyone know that one? Pretty famous problem, though perhaps a bit too deceptive to call a riddle. People who teach probability still deny the answer to this one. Ray might be one of them. :lol: Let's hope not:

    You're on that show, Let's Make a Deal. You have three doors in front of you. Behind one door is a prize. Something like a shiny new car. It doesn't matter. You want it. Behind the other two doors are goats. And we're assuming that you don't want those. :lol: Anyway, you get to pick a door, and so you pick one. The host, however, knowing which door hides the prize, opens one of the doors - not the one you picked. He purposefully opens a door to reveal a goat. Then he offers you the chance to change your choice.

    Can you increase your odds of winning the prize by switching your choice to the remaining mystery door? Or do your odds remain the same? Can you explain your answer in terms of probability?

    If you know this one already, by all means let us know that you know it, but try to refrain from answering until the ones who don't know it have a shot at it. ;)
     
  20. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Now that the third door reveals a goat, the problem is reduced to a two-door choice with a 50% chance of luck. You still don't know which of the 2 closed doors may hide the prize, so the door you already picked has as good a chance as the other. There is absolutely no point in now picking the other door. I.e. you can not increase your chances.
     

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