Thank you to all those who donated in 2015!



DONATION STATUS
Needed before 2016-12-31
$ 2,500
So far donated
$ 595

Playing many voices

Discussion in 'Technique' started by hunwoo, Oct 5, 2007.

  1. hunwoo

    hunwoo New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Zealand
    WLM:
    hunwoo91@hotmail.com
    LOCATION:
    New Zealand
    I always have problem with Bach Fugues mainly because of voices.
    I'm playing WTC 1 G sharp Minor (4 voices :!: )and I'm having trouble with the fugue.
    Can you guys give me some tips with this fugue?
     
  2. Terez

    Terez New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Gulfport, MS, USA
    WLM:
    terez2727@hotmail.com
    AOL:
    terez2727
    LOCATION:
    Gulfport, MS, USA
    Analyze the fugue in as much detail as possible. Know where each little bit of material in the counterpoint, during subject or sequence, comes from. If it's a bit of a motif, you'll want to treat it accordingly. Look for BACH signatures. They usually mark some sort of profound harmonic shift, not because Bach was conceited, but because the tones themselves force such a shift. I would suggest analyzing it yourself because if you read someone else's analysis, you won't appreciate it as much as if you had found everything yourself. But of course check out an online analysis when you are done - all of the WTC analyses are available online, somewhere.

    Try playing through it, only playing subject material. Mark it on the score that you practice with. Practice slow, and don't go faster if you can't maintain clarity of your voices and their interactions with each other.
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    A very late post, maybe you'll read it........... My teacher is amazing at playing Bach preludes&fugues - the tips she passed to me were:

    Make sure you know every voice off by heart separately.

    -Before combining any parts, play one and sing/hum another.
    -When combining parts, play them in pairs in all different combinations.

    The above plans of attack really helped me to 'hear' the voices independently when playing.
     
  4. RichNocturne

    RichNocturne New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2007
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Piano teacher, GA at Ball State University. Curre
    Location:
    Muncie, IN
    Last Name:
    Anatone
    First Name:
    Richard
    LOCATION:
    Muncie, IN
    an even more late response

    My teacher has told me numerous times that Julliard students are told to solfeg one voice while playing the others...it sounds like a nightmare, but once you got it, you're golden...
    I've never done it, but I've seen it done and it's crazzzzzy
    Rich
     
  5. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    2,388
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Obamanation, unfortunately...
    Last Name:
    Grocholski
    First Name:
    Julius
    LOCATION:
    Obamanation, unfortunately...
    Here is a newbie (n00b) question:

    Do all piano compositions have voices? I would assume that if both hands are used to play notes, then that piece has two voices.

    Anyone want to clarify?

    Thanks.
     
  6. PJF

    PJF New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Fournet
    First Name:
    Pierre
    Re: an even more late response

    Hey, I thought only I did that. :lol:
     
  7. PJF

    PJF New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Fournet
    First Name:
    Pierre
    Some pieces have just one voice like a violin/cello/voice solo with accompaniment (Chopin nocturne op. post. in C# minor or Chopin etude op25 no7).

    Some pieces aren't fugues but are composed SATB, like a string quartet (Beethoven piano sonata #16, last movement, introduction)

    In these, you can clearly hear the individual voices (melodies) in contrast to any accompaniment, which tends to be less melodic and more harmonic (chordal).

    PF
     

Share This Page