Thank you to those who donated to Piano Society in 2017.

Organ time

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by techneut, Feb 15, 2009.

  1. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    9,927
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Last Name:
    Breemer
    First Name:
    Chris
  2. musicusblau

    musicusblau Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    Messages:
    3,028
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    High-school-teacher with subjects music and german
    Location:
    Germany
    Last Name:
    Pfaul
    First Name:
    Andreas
    Hi Chris,
    these sound very nice to me. The first is an improvement of the older version, I think, though I had no opportunity to listen to the old version again. A listening-pleasure as always!
     
  3. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,152
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Chief Operating Officer, retired
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    Last Name:
    April
    First Name:
    David
    Hi Chris,

    I listened to all three works. You did a fine job playing them in my opinion. Great sound too. Excellent!

    I'm curious: Which do you find to be the greater challenge, recording piano sound or organ sound?

    I'll go out on a limb (which you might saw off :lol: ) and guess that it's generally harder to capture organ sound satisfactorily. I'd base that on the premise that the location and orientation of the organ chambers could pose a difficulty. Also, I would think that the acoustics of a church, theater or hall are what they are, (say, for example, a too lively sound, echos, excessive reverberation, etc., depending on the venue). In a home recording, acoustical annoyances can often be remedied or at least mitigated. Or to keep it apples and apples, even if the piano is in an auditorium, a lot can be accomplished with microphone capsules and mic stand placement on stage. So I would lean to organ sound being the more difficult to capture well. But maybe not?

    David
     
  4. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    9,927
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Last Name:
    Breemer
    First Name:
    Chris
    Thanks for that David. I did my very best to make these as clean, consistent, and transparent as I could.

    I'm not too bothered with sound actually. Having decided on a suitable spot for the Edirol I just stick with that, no challenge at all there :wink: I add Light Concert Hall reverb, as in my piano recordings, and that's it. Not great sound this, but quite acceptable, and certainly better than from my previous venue.
     
  5. Jessica

    Jessica New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    student
    Location:
    St. Petersburg, FL
    Hi, I like your playing. I haven't posted any of my recordings yet, but unfortunately all I have to work with are electronic instruments. With regard to the previous poster, i definitely agree that organ sound is harder for me to capture. You see, when I record" piano" sounds, I can simply run the 1/4-inch outputs from my digital piano into the CD recorder or computer sound card. But when I record my old Baldwin organ, which has no line outs, I must use a minidisc recorder and cheap lovelier mic. Then, I'm confronted with the old dilema of getting as much gain as possible without clipping the inputs. Just when I think I've got it set perfectly, there's always a note or two on the pedalboard (with a 16-foot stop engaged0, that always makes it clip!! Oh, I wish I could use an in-line equalizer just to tone down the intensity of that little frequency band on that one note! Thanks again for posting.
     
  6. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    9,927
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Last Name:
    Breemer
    First Name:
    Chris
    Thanks Jessica !
    A Baldwin organ, never heard of that. I can imagine an acoustic recording of an electronic organ is not optimal especially if you use one of these darned minidisc thingies. Ther are maybe not so many real pipe organs around in Florida si I guess you'll have to make do. In any case you do play organ, and that is a good thing. Always nice to hear this from other pianists.

    Actually, you should check out the virtual pipe organ concept which is really popular these days. A Midi keyboard+footboard, connected to your PC, and a sample library of your dream organ, and you'll make the most lovely sounds.
     
  7. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,152
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Chief Operating Officer, retired
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    Last Name:
    April
    First Name:
    David
    Hi Chris,

    Some historical trivia:

    Baldwin as a company started in 1862--but as a piano and organ retailer actually--holding franchises from Steinway, Chickering, Decker, and Vose as well as from Esty reed organs. In 1889 they began building Baldwin organs in Chicago, having bought the Hamilton Organ Co. The building of Baldwin pianos started very soon thereafter in Cincinnati in 1890. Until 1977 the entity was always known as Baldwin Piano & Organ Company. From 1977 to 1984, it was Baldwin-United. At that point, following a management leveraged buyout, the entity once again became Baldwin Piano & Organ Co. In the same way that Baldwin pianos compete domestically with Steinway and Mason & Hamlin, Baldwin organs in their time competed principally with the Allen organ (sometimes sold through Steinway dealers) and also the Rogers organ. But with a huge, irreversible slide in the U.S. home electronic organ market starting in the early 1980s, Baldwin ceased making organs altogether around 1997, and then became known as the Baldwin Piano Company. Baldwin was acquired by Gibson Guitar Corporation in 2001 and is now a wholly-owned subsidiary. That's the short of it!

    David
     
  8. Jessica

    Jessica New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    student
    Location:
    St. Petersburg, FL
    My Baldwin is a Studio II. I wonder if you know what decade, approximately, it was made in? I'm just happy to have a full pedalboard to tap-dance on after putting up with a spinet for the last two years!! It's voiced very much like a theatre organ, which I like ;) But, I can turn the trems off and make it sound pretty classical too. But, yeah, it is hard to record!! There are actually a few pipe organs in my neighborhood at churches, but I don't think they'd be thrilled to have a stranger come in and play / record them. I like to play the organ almost as much as the piano.
     
  9. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    9,927
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Last Name:
    Breemer
    First Name:
    Chris
    Maybe they won't, maybe they will. Have you asked yet ?

    That's the spirit ;-)
     
  10. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,152
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Chief Operating Officer, retired
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    Last Name:
    April
    First Name:
    David
    Hi Jessica,

    I play a Baldwin Model L Artist Grand, so am familiar with their pianos. The Baldwin website has a facility for determining the age of Baldwin pianos by serial number (currently not operating, as the database is being updated). But there is no similar facility there for dating the organs they made. If you have a service technician, he might possibly have a way of dating the instrument or at least approximating its age for you. If that doesn't pan out, you could also write to Baldwin and ask them. They might be able to direct you to the serial number and perhaps they still have a reference in their archive to find the year of manufacture.

    David
     
  11. Francois de Larrard

    Francois de Larrard Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2008
    Messages:
    744
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    Researcher
    Location:
    Lyon, France
    Home Page:
    Last Name:
    Larrard
    First Name:
    Francois de
    Well, I just wanted to tell you that I may have solved a part of my connecting problems, which to date made difficult for me to download files from PS. Then I've just listened your three short pieces, and thanks to you I spent a very good time ! Your articulation is very sharp and your taste for playing Bach quite perfect ! Just a question: have these pieces a pedal part, or are they just played with manual keyboards ?
     
  12. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    9,927
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Last Name:
    Breemer
    First Name:
    Chris
    Thanks Francois. I think my organ lessons come into effect here, in playing transparently and well-articulated. This is maybe more important on organ than on any other instrument.

    These are all manualiter pieces as you have probbaly concluded by the absence of low notes on 16-foot stops. Apart from that, these pieces typically sound very much like the 'real thing' and typically the keyboard parts are much harder than in the 'pedaliter' works. They are certainly not a 'soft option' for organists shunning the pedal - though I must admit not having to worry about the feet is great now and then :lol:
     
  13. Francois de Larrard

    Francois de Larrard Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2008
    Messages:
    744
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    Researcher
    Location:
    Lyon, France
    Home Page:
    Last Name:
    Larrard
    First Name:
    Francois de
    I'm sure these pieces are far to be easy to play (I think Bach is NEVER easy !). I just wonder why an organist composer decides not to use the pedal keyboard: is it because he chooses to keep the music in the medium-treble part of the scale (kind of esthetical option) ? Or to produce something which can be played on some sort of limited instruments which have no pedal keyboard (as an harmonium, although these instruments probably did not exist at Bach's time)? Or for beginners ?
     

Share This Page