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One for Chris, I suppose

Discussion in 'Technique' started by jcabraham, May 8, 2010.

  1. jcabraham

    jcabraham New Member

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    Occupation:
    I sell a little Amway...
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    LOCATION:
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    So I now have an organ teacher and a piano teacher. I'm finding that my organ teacher is stressing (in the Bach manner) a quiet hand, as much as possible. My piano teacher, on the other hand, is stressing a lot of arm and wrist rolling for legato technique. I have actually had piano lessons in which I've been criticized for technique I just learned from the organ guy. Have you experienced this contradiction yourself? It could be, of course, that I'm simply misinterpreting what my organ teacher is saying....

    P.S. How difficult is BWV 641, from the orgelbuchlein? Is it feasible after having learned a couple of short p&f? And what about BWV 565?

    Regards,

    Jim Abraham
     
  2. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    My organ teacher also recommends minimal movement. Maybe that goes with the repertoire, I only play Bach and the occasional Walther or Bustehude with him. You generally don't see organists wave their arms around a lot so I guess it makes sense not to. Due to the feet involved, you haved to think very much about balance and sitting completely stable and relaxed. Can't jump up and around like some pianists do.

    BWV 641 is not overly difficult but needs good rhythmic stability due to all the different note values. I think it needs to go a bit quicker than my funereal rendition of some years ago. I've never played BWV 565, I don't like the piece much. I thik I'll keep it for last :wink:
     
  3. keyboarclass

    keyboarclass New Member

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    You are playing two different instruments - would you use the same technique for tennis as badminton?
     
  4. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    I don't know, not playing either of these sports, and not being a nut about technique. But there are do's and don'ts on piano and organ alike. Being a pianist when starting to play organ is a mixed blessing. It seems that for each advantage you have there is some disadvantage too. In my experience playing organ is more beneficial for the pianist than playing piano would be for an organist.
     
  5. bass_clef

    bass_clef New Member

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    I had problems when i stopped playing the organ and started playing the piano (it was impossible to to do an organ performance exam at my college). There is so much expression in the piano, your technique has to be precise to achieve the subtle sounds. With the organ, there is no dynamic expression so its more about playing lightly and with precision.

    You have to create a mind set for each instrument. Think that you are playing 2 compleatly different instruments, they may both have keyboards, but they are nothing alike.

    I'm not very good at playing 2 instruments, so i was glad that I stopped playing the organ so I could focus on my piano technique.

    I don't think I helped you, but I don't think there is any easy answer ;)

    Good luck

    Bass
     

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