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Next piece to play ...

Discussion in 'Repertoire' started by echoyjeff222, Sep 8, 2013.

  1. echoyjeff222

    echoyjeff222 Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi all,

    I'm trying to figure out the next piece I want to tackle. I've recently been doing a lot of shorter pieces. I'm currently playing Haydn's Sonata in B minor (http://imslp.org/wiki/Keyboard_Sonata_i ... dn,_Joseph) along with Heller's Prelude in C# minor, Op. 81 No. 10.

    I know that I want to play "Songs without words op 622 no.6 in a major (spring song)" as a sight read / short piece, but I think I need to try something a bit more challenging/meaty. The last Beethoven sonata I played was the Pathetique (all three movements). I really like Chopin, but my teacher wants me to get away from doing too much Chopin. She wants me to try some Brahms or something a bit different.

    I was thinking about the Waldstein ... I love the first movement. However, I've also never played Liszt. I heard No.3 in G sharp minor (La Campanella) and thought that I might want to try it. It sounds a bit difficult though!

    thanks for all the input
     
  2. andrew

    andrew Member Piano Society Artist

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    By all means try the Waldstein. You'll of course have to come to a decision about the glissandi in the last movement, though..
    Op.31 no.2 is a meaty sonata without being prohibitively difficult.

    La Campanella might not be the best place to start with Liszt. I'd recommend the 5th (fairly straightforward) and 11th (if you have good fingerwork) Hungarian Rhapsodies; also Harmonies du soir from the Transcendentals. If you have good octaves and arpeggios, the fantasy on Rienzi is worth considering as the end result sounds much harder than it is (with the exception of the cadenza near the end which is nasty).
     
  3. echoyjeff222

    echoyjeff222 Member Piano Society Artist

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    Thanks for the feedback. I've decided that I don't really like Liszt anymore, haha. I like a few, but the majority just sounds very much like *CLANG CLANG CLANG* A bit too aggressive for my style ...

    What do you guys think about Brahms intermezzi for piano op 117 e flat major? It sounds absolutely beautiful, but I also want something that will move me forward, technically speaking.

    I was also looking at the Beethoven Op.31 no.2 ... I like it as well. So it's basically between that Brahms, Waldstein, or the op.31 no.2.
     
  4. rkazandzhidi

    rkazandzhidi New Member

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    Why not play some Scriabin? Scriabin is extremely underplayed. I would suggest learning his Opus 11 preludes, they are based off of Chopin’s 24 preludes. Meaning in every major and minor key. Ive performed them many times and I find that audience members appreciate them much more. Its something fresh and some of them are very atmospheric. Others are passionate and others can be just serene. The moods that he can make in a piece of music is amazing.
     
  5. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Scriabin extremely underplayed? You must be joking. It might be fair to say "somewhat underplayed by non-Russian pianists".
     

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