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My Unknown Youtube Debut!

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by arensky, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. arensky

    arensky New Member

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    I found out a few days ago while surfing Youtube that this young violinist had posted excerpts of a recital we gave in a private home in Las Vegas almost two years ago. Here's the first movement of Beethoven's Piano and Violin Sonata Op.12 No.1. A couple scary spots (notably around .36 to .41) but not so bad, and certainly much better than I remember, which is always a nice feeling! The Vieuxteps Yankee Doodle Variations should appear as a link when you click the Beethoven, although I'm not doing much of the work in that one.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8wtbs1pGIk
     
  2. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    After listening to recordings of three recent performances, I've come to the conclusion that it's never as bad as I remember. :lol: Being on stage is scary....

    Nice job. :wink: I liked when the camera was on your hands - you have nice gestures.
     
  3. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    It's good you eventually came in view, or else I would not have recognized you :lol:
    The beard suits you.

    Beethoven sonatas are fun to play, especially the early ones. Well done both of you ! There's the odd little slip and the occasional less-than-pure violin intonation, but nothing out of order for a live performance. Very good ensemble playing.
     
  4. arensky

    arensky New Member

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    Indeed, the page turner is more prominent than me! The beard is gone; a year ago one of my music theory students asked in class how old I was and I declined to answer, but I put an extra credit question on that weeks exam, " how old do you think Mr. Coleman is?" Most of the answers had me pegged 6-8 years older than I am, a couple were in the ballpark and one was actually dead on (she received one point) :p . I shaved it off after the end of the semester, and now people think I'm 6-8 years younger 8) . Funny, last summer my hair started to turn gray, not drastically but noticeably. Ya just can't win! :x :lol: The beard will return in a few years, I thought it suited me too.

    I've always had a disconnect with Beethoven, he's like this giant forbidding monolith that I can't really relate to, and it's damn hard to play. The concerti and chamber pieces (like this one)are my favorites, but as for his solo music there's about ten of the sonatas I really love, and the rest, well they're just there. You won't hear my Beethoven Sonata Cycle in this lifetime, that's for sure! But as I "mature" , he gradually makes more sense. Mozart on the other hand, I've always loved and he makes perfect sense; Beethoven presents a conflict, the struggle ensues, and he beats his foe to death. Mozart, he is like the puppet master, presenting the struggle as a show, for our delight and wonder. Perhaps it was his operatic and theatrical nature that he brought to his instrumental music. On the other hand, he never wrote a Op. 111, and probably never would have. And would have Beethoven, if not for his deafness and isolation from the world? Wow, I'm running off at the mouth here! My random thoughts...

    Glad you enjoyed it! This was a performance that occurred at a time when I was seriously considering quitting music and the piano altogether. Looking back, it wasn't that bad, as I already mentioned. Now; HOW TO NEVER MAKE A NOTE ERROR??? This is my quest! :shock: 8)
     
  5. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    I am not the person to advise you on that. I guess it boils down to either practising a lot or editing a lot :wink:
    I was just today listening to Scherbakov's recordings of Lyapunov Op.11 (all on YouTube) and he hit some wrong notes here and there. Very minor things of course, but still ! Actually a little imperfection makes things a bit more human. Today's recordings just seem too perfect sometimes.
     
  6. felipesarro

    felipesarro New Member

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    I agree with Chris.

    no one is a piano player machine. making no error should not be a main concern. if this happens to be, okay! but if this is the main concern, it leads to unmusical and unhuman performances, which I find very annoying. I do believe that practicing 10 hours a day is the fastest way to achieve unmusical note-perfect performances.

    said this...
    now I must say I make too much errors for a live performance, but this is different. hehe
    Cortot used to make a lot of errors, but as I'm not even half Cortot... I should practice more!
     
  7. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi arensky,

    I've listened to some of your solo renditions here on PS and enjoyed them all, but this YouTube debut is the first time I've heard you in ensemble repertoire. I share your "disconnect" with Beethoven. (In my earlier years I made sure that I played five or six of his piano sonatas to be "well-rounded", but have not touched any since.) Nonetheless I believe you did a wonderful job in this piano/violin sonata. I was quite impressed by your playing which was very sympathetic to the the composer and your collaborator.

    Playing with freedom and taking some risks outweighs an occasional note falling under the piano in my opinion. I do not edit my own recordings, preferring the authenticity of the original performances. Horowitz once said that if an artist performs a piece 1,000 times and approaches unattainable perfection just once, then that is a very fortunate pianist indeed.

    Thanks for posting this sonata!

    David
     
  8. arensky

    arensky New Member

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    Sorry to dredge up last year's business, but I've been thinking a lot about what I wrote here hastily, "HOW TO NEVER HIT A WRONG NOTE". I wrote that in frustration, because it often seems that I'm close to that goal. I didn't mean to imply that that was all that I was after, because of course that's not all there is to it. But it does help one's standing with other musicians, and the freedom from note mistakes SHOULD make one freer to be a truly great interpreter, at one with the music. And yet, the note perfect players are often the sterile ones, so obviously there's a price to be paid for physical perfection. I guess this is a trade off that happens, a "yin-yang" sort of thing. So, I'm aiming for balance. Ten hours practice a day? I can't do that anymore, and actually find that skipping a couple of days keeps the music from sounding "practiced", although more than a couple off is NOT good :wink: And editing is not an option, of course. Anyway, I'm finding that playing well is a mental thing, although one has to put one's hours of work at the keyboard in at some point.

    I quoted David's Horowitz quote because I tell my students about that when they are frustrated; you can only get it as god as you can at the moment, and some moments are better than others, and we have to strive to have more of those!

    David, I read in your bio that you studied with Michael Kramer; I remember him, he was leaving teaching at UMass Lowell as I was starting my grad work there with Thomas Stumpf. How is he doing? I met him a few times, and was impressed by him, he was a good pianist and seemed to be a really nice guy.
     
  9. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi arensky,

    On wrong notes: I visualize myself entering a deserted ancient Greek temple to play a Baldwin SD10 there and to serve the composer and the art--but I still make a mistake now and then! :lol:

    Yes, I spent 7 years studying with Michael Kramer. (I left lessons to do my doctoral program in business.) He is a thorough musician and wonderful artist. He had a Carnegie Hall debut and was active in competitions and recording engineering too. I attended several of his recitals at Northern Essex Community College. His playing was very inspiring. We had many animated discussions around interpretation. As long as I could justify my point of view in terms of the score itself, music theory and the performance practices, he'd cut me some slack. I learned a great deal from him, so owe him a debt. At Boston University he studied with Anthony di Bonaventura who not only passed down his own insights to Michael, but those of his own teacher, the legendary Isabelle Vengerova. That gave me some exposure to the Russian School of piano, which was invaluable, as I play mostly Russian Late Romantic repertoire now.

    These days Michael teaches mathematics at Northern Essex Community College. He's a wonderful person and friend, and we do email occasionally. Sometimes I send him some of my recording links as well.

    David
     

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