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My senior recital

Discussion in 'General' started by Terez, Jul 10, 2011.

  1. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    Thanks so much for listening Hye-Jin! One day... :wink:
     
  2. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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  3. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    I'll do it if you play 10/12 like Cameron Carpenter. :wink:
     
  4. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Tell you what. We'll challenge Carpenter into playing 25/11 on the pedals only :p
     
  5. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    No doubt he's already working on it.
     
  6. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    If I remember well I didn't reply because I didn't know what to add to my previous mail. Now I listened to the 25/11 (the "decent" version) and I still have nothing to add. The muddy and distant recording doesn't help to discriminate the small details that would deserve a comment. On a larger scale, I still hear a lot of unevenness, "struggle", a very weak LH and definitely too much pedal (on the other hand nobody would expect that you resolve that bitch in a year or so).
     
  7. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    Except for me! :lol: But yeah, I'm still working on it, though I took a break to start working on some other etudes. I'm encouraged by how much I have gained from working on 25/11, so I figured I stand to gain even more from working on others. 25/11 is back to half-tempo, or practicing at around 80, to get rid of the unevenness and struggle. (BTW, never fear to criticize - the best thing about being your own worst critic is that you can take it - if I thought any of these recordings were good, they'd be in the audition room).

    I'm glad you're still alive. I miss you!
     
  8. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Working on different Chopin's etudes can help you to improve your technique on a general level, but each etude covers separate technical problems and you have only a moderate synergy by even studying them all. The sensible thing to do is - especially if you don't like studies and exercises - to find useful snippets from the piano literature to address your weak points. This requires a wide knowledge of the literature of course, or a teacher who has it in your place. I don't think that an average student can go very far hammering away at the same stuff for years, even if they are the Chopin's Etudes.

    I don't have fear to criticize, if asked so, but why should I do it twice? :wink:
     
  9. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    Eh, I'm having a moment with the Chopin etudes right now, but I have Bach moments as well. My weak points generally revolve around the fact that I have no technical grounding to speak of. And yes, I don't like playing boring technical exercises, but I haven't been convinced that I am missing anything yet. (Really, it's more to do with the fact that I know I don't have the capability to make myself practice them; it would make me want to quit piano.) I'm also not convinced that a wide knowledge of the literature is really necessary unless one plans on playing a wide range of literature. For now I feel like there is enough variety in Chopin and Bach to keep me going for the rest of my life, but I would be interested in hearing your arguments to the contrary. As for teachers...I played for as many master classes as I could during my years at school, and asked for advice from every skilled pianist I knew. Sometimes I don't know how to apply these things, which is frustrating, but I keep trucking on.

    It's a good question. Depends on your regard for the person in question. :wink:
     

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