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more Mompou....

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by pianolady, Jan 1, 2013.

  1. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    This is a re-recording of one my earlier Mompou recordings. It's the Cancion y Danza no.6, which is I think the shortest of the set. My first version was quite sluggish; I'm so embarrassed by it. Like all the other Cancion y Danzas, the Cancion part is slow followed by the much livelier Danza part. I like this one a lot because it's very uplifting at the end (something I needed after playing a lot from Musica Callada....)

    Mompou - Cancion y Danza No. 6
     
  2. Francois de Larrard

    Francois de Larrard Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Monica,
    Thanks for sharing this nice piece. I cannot comment it very deeply, since I know little Mompou (but your rendition gives me the desire of knowing more about the man and the musician). I think you succeed in playing the piece with quite a catalan nature ! I just wonder wether the end should be more decresc. and vanishing (but I don't have the score...).
     
  3. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Francois,
    Thanks for listening. Mompou's Cancion y Danzas are really great...I love them!
     
  4. StuKautsch

    StuKautsch Member Piano Society Artist

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    Can't remember the original, Monica, but this one's certainly fine. Your Mompou is becoming one of your signatures.
     
  5. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    Thank you, Stu. If I am improving, it's due to my hanging around here so much. :)
    But the bad thing is that I cringe upon listening to many of my older recordings; my re-do list is growing and growing...
     
  6. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Monica,

    Your playing in this rendition certainly sounds convincing to me. The second section becomes very energetic. It must be challenging to play, especially getting those Spanish rhythms just right. A marvelous performance!

    I hear you on your "re-do" list. I'm engaged in that right now. I learned a number of Rachmaninoff preludes and made analog recordings back in the 1980s. Now I'm relearning and digitally rerecording them. It's a lot of work but well worth the effort.

    David
     
  7. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    Thank you for listening/commenting, David. This is a cute one - I really like the feel of the Dance section. I'm glad it came out okay.

    Regarding re-dos....I wish I had got a lot of my recordings right the first time. But at least it does seem to be easier to re-learn them than it was the first time. And most of my re-dos are pieces I still like. Actually, just last night I was sitting at my piano and wondered about what to play next. I have a couple things on my piano right now that I'm working on, but after I'm done with those, I have no clue what to look at. I've never really felt like this before. I can help other people pick out pieces but for reason I'm having trouble deciding on pieces for myself. Maybe I just need to take a break from piano; I dunno...

    Also, I wonder what the next 'new' way of recording will be. Like how we went from analog to digital - from tape cassettes to CD's.. What does the future hold for our ways of recording? Maybe our pianos can have a built-in recorder or something....(I'm rambling)....
     
  8. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Monica,

    That strikes a responsive chord with me. I explored several paths laid down by the Russian late romantics. But after I completed my Scriabin project, I wasn't really sure what I should play next. It seemed so odd, as it was always like I had a map in front of me. That's what gave me the idea to revisit Rachmaninoff and to relearn and rerecord those pieces digitally. When I did the first one, the Prelude in F# minor, I didn't know if the idea would work for me, as I've never been a "full circle" person who likes to go back and do things I've done before. But after posting that piece and now the G flat prelude, I see it differently and now believe that I'm using my time wisely. I also find it intriguing that I find myself not playing those pieces as I did at age 40. Nowadays I'm finding new insights into the music as I labor over them. They are easier to learn again, which saves some time. But occasionally I'll hit one of those really tricky and difficult passages that was a nemesis then, and to some degree is still not comfortable today. But I overcome them, sometimes requiring several recording takes to do it right. So... I guess this is to say that if you feel motivated and satisfied to revisit and redo some of your favorite music, then enjoy doing so. And when you get a recording that really pleases you, it feels like a celebration!

    I thought when I bought the Korg MR-1000 1-bit/2.8MHz audio recorder, that I had just bought the future, so was therefore "insured". Nope, the technology didn't catch on elsewhere to the best of my knowledge and did not become the wave of the future. So as the march of progress continues, some time in the future I'll undoubtedly have to rethink the equipment issue all over again, as when I left analog recording.

    David
     
  9. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    Yes, you're right...I like that! :)

    I'm glad you are feeling good about your re-do project. My problem is that I don't currently have anything to be excited about. I've got a Mompou set to complete, and a about three other short pieces I'm working on, but then that's it. I normally have a stack of music I want to play but nothing has piqued my interest lately. I thought I had stumbled upon something the other day but when I printed it out and then played through it, I knew that it didn't keep me interested, so I put it away. Same thing happened the time before that. I don't like this feeling of not being excited about some new music.
     
  10. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Monica,

    Same here. I have a stack several inches high. When I start to play through some of the pieces, I get that same "losing interest fast" feeling. Or, I'll encounter some really difficult technical issue and find that I'm put off by it. Yet my enthusiasm for piano in general has not flagged at all. Far from it! So for the time being, practicing these familiar pieces from decades ago gives me a warm feeling about practicing and doing new recordings of them. Once I've done as many of these as I'd like, maybe then I'll get the itch to start exploring unfamiliar territory again. I think, for example, of the Catoire works. It felt wonderful introducing other pianists here to so much fine music they (and I) had never heard before.

    David
     
  11. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    I can't for the life of me decide which direction to go - like what composer, or style, or era, etc.... I too would like the music to be something we don't already have on the site.
    Well, perhaps something will click when I get done with my current pieces, which I think will be in about a couple weeks. I really hope so...
     
  12. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    I totally can't understand that. I have exactly the opposite problem - there is so much wonderful music around, I feel like a child in a sweet shop. Thanks to YouTube, and thanks to IMSLP and other free music sites. It helps having a catholic taste I guess.
     
  13. richard66

    richard66 Richard Willmer Piano Society Artist

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    Quite right and a lot of the good stuff is the familiar stuff and not only pieces that lurk in dark corners. Of course playing is different from listening and whereas the (say) Moonlight might seem boring, playing it is quite another thing. I find that playing A today and then playing B tomorrow and then returning to A the day after I am always surprised how it has become different, because of the infgluence of B - very often because there were tecnical issues with A which have been ironed out by B.

    Another thing, of course, is that even though there is a pile of scorees lying about, there is no time to match!
     
  14. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Yes, that IS a problem for sure. But not a problem of such magnitude as not being able to find something worthwhile to play :D
     
  15. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    I know there are tons of piano pieces out there that I haven’t played yet, but I usually have enough music picked out to last me months and right now I don’t.

    The most fun thing for me is when I hear something new that really grabs me and then I locate the score and discover that we don’t yet have it on our site(that's a biggie!). And to make it better, the piece is part of a set where most of the individual pieces appeal to me. I love when that happens!! I listen to music at my desk at work, and a couple times I’ve heard something new and wanted to learn. That happened yesterday – I heard an impromptu by Massenet that appealed to me, but I can’t find the score. I guess I could go on Youtube to try to find something I like, but I wouldn’t know where to start. I wish I were still taking lessons; my former teacher always steered me into some great music that was new to me.

    And now as I sit and think about this, I realize that I never sit down at the piano and play just for myself anymore. I mean, I don’t just sit there and play anything. It’s always music I’m working on. I never go back to formerly-learned pieces unless they need to be re-worked. Is this bad? Am I so bent on producing recordings that I’ve forgotten how to play for just the sheer joy of making nice music? Maybe I’ve been here too long? Maybe I’m burning out? Well, if I can’t decide on what music to play next, then I guess that will force me to take a break from piano. Oh well, time will tell…I still have at least two or three weeks of music to get through.
     
  16. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    But that's the easiest part. Just follow YT's recommendations. It knows pretty much what you taste is after a while. I find this a most fantastic feature. Also, subscribe to any channels you've found something good on. Many of these are gold mines. Lastly, be inquisitive and listen to all and anything you have not heard before, *especially* the names you do not know about. Like yesterday I happened on this awesome piece by Pancho Vladigerov's son: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xepw5ug291Y
    This is one of the many channels (fyrexia) holding countless surprises.

    I recognize that. Every now and then I take a break from preparing recordings and just take random books out to revisit things. It is al;ways very refreshing. It is a pitye that a lot of pieces just fade out of your life once recorded, but one can't keep playing everything. The joy of discovering new things amply compensates.
     
  17. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    That's very helpful - thank you. I guess I could look at it as like going on a treasure hunt. :)

    (I didn't know Vladigerov had a son who is also a composer.)
     
  18. richard66

    richard66 Richard Willmer Piano Society Artist

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    But surely you have a core repertoire?

    In my case I find that, maybe due to tecnical deficiencies, I always have something new to find even in the oldest pieces. I believe it is only now I can actually perform some of the music I first learned 20 years ago. Now, if I tell you my playing of Mozart, Schubert and Beethoven has improved by learning Rautavaara you might raise and eyebrow (or even two or three!), but this is just what has happened. Why? Because I had to work on speed and the speed barrier was broken by Rautavaara, making it now child's play to play any of the fast movements. And, because to speed one cannot rely on reading, I had to develop my memory and confidence (which in turn is brought by through memory and conscious use of fingering), so that I can laugh at the idea of making mistakes because they just do not come - as long as I am concentrated.

    I believe many of us here fall into the recording trap, where we no longer perform, but record and once it is recorded, we can forget it. After all, we can always go back to the recording, can we not? We are no longer interested in playing: we want to record and to record what has not been recorded before. These days if one wants Ismagilov, Suk or Ishikagawanapanitupitaminovit this is the place to be, but if you fancy Mozart or Schubert...
     
  19. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Sure, I have as much core stuff on the plannning as unknown stuff. It just takes much longer as there is so much to live up to. I keep diligently working on my WTC re-recording for example.

    Absolutely, playing modern music hugely increases one's overall abilities and resilience. Personally I can also say that my playing of anything has improved dramatically because of practising lots of Bach.

    An interesting conjecture. I think you are right to a certain extent. Discovering and recording something new for the site, has a definite ring to it, more so than providing the umpteenth version of the Moonlight or Raindrop. But I object to the notion that we are not interested in performing. Every recording is also (or should be) a fine performance, even if has seen some post processing within the limits.
    I think our site has a healthy balance of core and specialist repertoire but I would urge everybody to try both.
     
  20. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    I have never raised three eyebrows!(eww gross) :lol:

    No, I don’t really have a “core repertoire”. How can I since I’ve made 300, 400, or maybe even 500 recordings? When would I have time to play just a certain amount of pieces in order to maintain them in my fingers? I actually think that’s a little sad, though. I wish I did have a core repertoire. But at the same time, as has been mentioned, we learn more by playing more, so if I had to choose between maintaining a repertoire, or constantly learning new pieces, then I’d choose the latter.

    Except now, I seem to be going back and forth regarding whether to find something brand new to explore or if I should take out pieces that I’ve played before and re-learn them. I do understand how you guys say that one can find new aspects about an ‘old’ piece and hence it’s a little like starting fresh and/or working on technique. So I dunno….

    And I definitely think that recording is also performing. I still get nervous when I record. True, I’m more nervous in front of a live audience, but at least when you make a mistake in front of people; it’s over and done with. Time marches on and hopefully you’ve played more right notes than wrong, and people will remember the overall music, not just the mistakes. With recording and submitting online, your mistakes can be listened to over and over again….
     

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