DONATION STATUS
Needed before 2017-12-31
$ 1,000
So far donated
$ 1,045
Thank you to those who donated to Piano Society in 2016.
A big thank you to Project Petrucci who has helped us already meet our 2017 goal!

Major and Minor Piano Chords

Discussion in 'Technique' started by slopez, Feb 22, 2016.

Tags:
  1. slopez

    slopez New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Female
    Last Name:
    Audie
    First Name:
    Dewey
    what the difference between a major and minor chords is? Of course you should know that major chord sounds happy and a minor chord sounds sad. But, there is more to it than that. Take a minute and learn about the method to creating a minor chord.

    In music there is a system of organization called musical keys. These keys are defined by intervals in order from smallest to largest:

    unison = the same note or c
    minor 2nd = c#
    major 2nd = d
    minor 3rd = d#
    major 3rd = e
    perfect 4th = f
    tri-tone = f#
    perfect 5th = g
    minor 6th =g#
    major 6th = a
    minor 7th = a#
    major 7th = b
    octave = c

    Major and Minor Chords
    Major and minor are words used to describe the quality of a triad or series of two thirds. Major chords have a a major third above the root of the chord, and a perfect 5th above the root. But, the distance between the major third and perfect fifth is a minor third, therefore creating a series of two thirds. The minor chord has a minor third above the root, with a perfect fifth as well. however, the creates a major third between the minor third and perfect fifth, once again creating a series of two 3rds.

    Take a C major chord for example: start with c as a root, then go a major third up, or e. Then from the e for up a minor third or g. This creates a major chord.

    Now take c minor: Start on c, go up a minor third, or e-flat. Then go up a major third or g. This is a minor third.
     

Share This Page