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Learning piano without a teacher, how good could I come

Discussion in 'Technique' started by pianolady, Sep 16, 2008.

  1. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    That's interesting - I didn't know there were no piano teachers in Saudi Arabia. Is there that much of a lack of interest in playing piano in your country? And why is that, I wonder.
     
  2. bclever

    bclever New Member

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    Hi Tala, go to www.sheetmusicplus.com and search for the book "Perfect Practice". If you follow
    the techniques and advice in that book you will advance very rapidly even without a teacher.
     
  3. PJF

    PJF New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Try to leave the country?

    I know that may be an extremely impractical solution to your problem, but....
     
  4. Dexter00

    Dexter00 New Member

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    Well, in books and learning methods, it usually starts with scales and exercices...Hanon an Czerny exercices are the most used, and you'll find exercices for all levels...it's for almost eveyone boring, to start with.

    But, you don't have necessary to sart with scales/exercices, or pieces you find in books, that you don't really like.

    I think you have to listen to the music you like, and start with what you think is possible for you to learn, it's as simple as this. You are not a piano student, you are free, so pick a piece that you like, and see if you can progress, if not, change it.

    I think Bach's two-part Inventions are very good to start with, Chopin's Waltzes, some Mozart's Sonatas, and you can find even modern music like Satie's that is not difficult to start with. But technically, I think Bach's Inventions are the best choice, and after you can move the The Well-Tempered Keyboard, and Mozart/Haydn sonatas etc.

    But you are free to choose starting with more difficult pieces, just try. Just play what you like.
     
  5. bring18

    bring18 New Member

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    Hello talal07,

    I may be of some help to you.

    There's four key points to posture that I can tell you about, but I will wait to see if you are still responding in this forum.

    Next there's the very important point of correct finger actions. I can explain this but will wait until you reply.
     
  6. Mark

    Mark New Member Piano Society Artist

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    How'd you get a piano if music is so discouraged that no piano teachers can be found? I'd start by asking around for a teacher where you bought the piano/keyboard.

    I quoted this from the Wikipedia article on "music in Saudia Arabia":
    You should tell the authorities that the piano is a percussion instrument;)

    Seriously though, it seems like if you're in a big enough city to have a medical school, there should be areas liberal enough that you could find someone who could give you instruction in playing the piano if you ask around enough. You can certainly learn to play without a teacher, and there are a few famous examples of great pianists who were autodidacts, such as Leopold Godowsky, but they're exceptional.
     

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