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Kabalevsky Sonata No. 3, Op. 46 - 1st and 2nd movements

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by pianolady, Apr 2, 2009.

  1. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Anyone who thinks Kabalevsky composed only childrens pieces may be surprised when they hear these. And I must say, this music is much different than what I normally play. I may not even have wanted to play it a few years ago, but I really like it now.

    There are three parts; here are only the first two. I have only barely looked at the third movement, and besides - I don't like to wait and wanted to record these today.

    Kabalevsky - Piano Sonata No. 3 in F major Op. 46, I: Allegro con moto

    Kabalevsky - Piano Sonata No. 3 in F major Op. 46, II: Andante cantabile
     
  2. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    A bold endeavor and a fantastic rendition! He's rather difficult to conceptualize at first, but obviously your understanding is right on. I really like the 2nd movement. He's typical of the Russian school, he tends to have a lot of sudden dynamic contrasts from piano to forte, and driving rhythms, and dramatic shifts from staccato to sustained themes. So, don't be afraid to play his music on the edge of stability - That's when he sounds most effective.

    You're absolutely right, Kabalevsky is not a children's composer... It's amazing how these myths get started?! The only Kabalevsky music I own are his 24 Preludes, Op. 38 and they are fantastic pieces, and rather difficult - no child's play here. I love Nos. 16 and 24.

    Wow! how did you learn these pieces so fast after the Barcarolle?... Will we hear the 3rd Movement as well?... Congratulations!
     
  3. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    This is horrible, trash, garbage, yuck!








    April Fools one day late :lol: :lol:


    Did you memorize this or did you record three sheets, pause, and continue to play then edited it?

    Pax,
    -jg
     
  4. wiser_guy

    wiser_guy Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    I am impressed. Two sonata movements and so boldly played. Just the size of them scares me away.
    You have done an excellent job, Monica. Style, dynamics, phrasing, control all in balance. Not my favourite music, but I listened through both smoothly.
     
  5. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Thanks George. I really like that 2nd movement too. The 1st movement was fun to learn though because it's so different from I am used to. I needed to take some vitamins and coffee before I started recording it. Yes - I plan to do the 3rd movement too, just not right away. It's equally hard as the 1st so I need a lot! of time and practice.

    Have you played some of Kabalevsky's Op. 27 (thirty children's pieces)? There are some nice ones in that set too.


    Julius - no, not memorized. :wink:


    Thanks, Pantelis. I know, this is pretty wild music, isn't it? Might take a little time for it to grow on you.
     
  6. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Monica,

    Excellent playing! You have a very eclectic approach to repertoire. Great! I be interested to hear the third movement of this sonata.

    David
     
  7. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Seems like Kabalevsky had listened closely to the middle and late Prokofiev sonatas (though it could as well be the other way around, I don't know the chronology).

    Excellent playing and gorgeous sound. My only point is that the 1st movement feels to slow and cautious. I miss some of the excitement and that typical Shostakovich-like devil-may-care exuberance. I can hear that you do not want to take any risks, you tend to slow down ever so slightly for a demanding passage. Maybe it's the right thing to do, but I'm not sure. Anyway, well done.
     
  8. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Thank you for listening, David and Chris.
     
  9. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    Monica, I can't recall playing any of the pieces from Op. 27. Bravo! I see that you've recorded almost the entire set. I've only played a few preludes from Op. 39, which probably need more practice now that I think of it... Don't you wish we were all like Liszt and not have to practice for the latter part of our lives... :p
     
  10. musicusblau

    musicusblau Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Bravo, bravissimo! You become better and better, Monica, and I appreciate your stylistic variety. May be the Allegro molto could be a little bit faster and have a bit more drive here and there for my taste, but you play all very musically, expressively and note-perfectly, I think. That´s a great achievement! You bring out very well the lyrical moments in the second movement.
    I like Kabalewskys music. There are so nice and interesting harmonical moments in it.
    Congratulations to this great performance!
    Will you also record the third movement?
     
  11. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Right on, George! But when exactly does the latter part of our lives start? :wink: :lol:

    Thank you again, Andreas. Yes, I intend to record the third movement. But I have too many other things ahead of it right now, so it will be a while.

    As to the first movement – I have mixed feelings. When I was first learning it, I had not listened to any other recording and just played it the way I felt. Then I did actually find two recordings of it online and boy was I surprised by what I heard!

    The first performer plays it so fast that you can not hear half of the notes. (And I am not exaggerating.) The second performer plays slightly slower (still faster than me) but the difficult passages are a total mess! Wrong notes galore!! Really, I couldn’t believe it.

    So I wonder….should one play a piece as fast as possible just for the sake of playing it fast? The first player – you can’t hear half the notes – this can’t be something the composer would approve of, right? The second player – the passages that were a mess – most likely because it is impossible to play them that fast. Another thing that I think wouldn’t please the composer.

    Too bad Kabalevsky is not still around. But there are probably people around today that actually did know him, since he died only 22 years ago. I would like to talk to someone who knew him and knew about his intended tempo markings!

    sorry - it's late and I am rambling...
     
  12. robert

    robert Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    You made a solid work as always!

    I have not heard these pieces before but it seems to me like you have spent quite some times with them and made your own interpretation and not only playing the notes. I will listen back to them a couple of times more to get to know them better.
     
  13. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Thank you for listening, Robert. :)
     
  14. musicusblau

    musicusblau Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Hi Monica,
    you could be right with your tempo-remarks. I think, you have choosen a tempo, which is not too slow and not too fast for you. That´s the main-thing, that we choose a tempo, in which we can express all what we want to (and what´s corresponding to the composers intention, of course, so, yes, it would be interesting to hear the opinion of people, who still knew Kabaleswky).
     
  15. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    Good question, Monica, it's been reputed that Liszt didn't have to practice during the last 35 years of his life. So after his 40th birthday, I assume the exercise books were consumed in the fireplace on a cold winter night.

    Pianolady wrote:
    There are technicians and there are musicians. The demands and expectations for young pianists are unreasonably difficult to play fast and dazzle the crowd. This is why I am not a professional pianist. Virtuosity is great achievement, but its ultimate goal is not just playing fast and loud. I hope the intentions of music are more mature than that. We are living in an age of expediency, superficiality, and egos. To make an impression above everyone else, young pianists have the perception that they need to play as fast as they can. You here it in concerts, recordings, and competitions everywhere. This is great if it were a road race, but to the informed listener, it serves no justice to the music. I am very supportive of music, but I am leery of spending a lot of money on concerts featuring young musicians that feel that they have something to prove by performing a fireworks display. In daily life, I find myself going back to the recordings which may not always be the most technically brilliant, but to my ears, are the most musical above all other criteria.

    All too often you'll hear about young pianists confronting midlife crises later on in life, and find themselves rededicating their efforts to rediscovery and research. As counter-intuitive as it may seem, they end up practicing to play slower with a redefined musical personality. It is after that point of maturity that a pianist reemerges with a signature sound. That's when to book those overpriced tickets! :D
     
  16. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Very good point. I like that. So actually, I am better than the professionals because I play slower right from the start! :lol: :lol: (that's a joke)
     
  17. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Sorry for coming late to this one, Monica. I downloaded it a few days ago but haven't had time to listen to it properly.

    Kabalevsky piano music is seldom played. And the composer seems not to be well liked by all the pianists. In the Forties Horowitz learnt and played in concert some Preludes from Op.38 (which, as David said, should be definitely rediscovered) and Sonatas Nos.2 and 3. The latter is a very charming work and you have a pretty good grasp of it (I'm waiting for the last movement though! :wink: ). I have just one remark, about the internal tempo changes. In the first movement, you play L'istesso tempo (the same tempo) considerably faster than the previous one. Then poco agitato is a tad slower. Lastly I miss the accelerando before a tempo più mosso which by the way you don't play più mosso as it should be. In the second movement, again, in the last page there's Poco meno mosso and a tempo (meno mosso del tempo I) which you don't do. Don't know if it's deliberate or something you didn't pay attention to. Nice job, nonetheless.
     
  18. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Oh, Alfonso - you said a lot, here. I can probably come up with some reasonable explanations:)wink:) , except my Kabalevsky music is buried somewhere and I don't have time to look for it right now. I'll try to get to it later. Thank you for listening.
     
  19. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Ok, Alfonso - I found my music. You are right about my tempo fluctuations. Some of the reason is that I just can't play certain sections any faster. I think I will redo the first section, though. I can play that faster and then it will match up with the L'istesso tempo. I'm in a bit of hurry right now, but I will look at the other places you mention - especially on the 2nd movement. I thought I pretty much had that one down, but I guess I don't.

    So thank you for this. It is easier to re-do something when it's still in the fingers, rather than later when you have re-learn everything.
     
  20. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    That's true. By the way, I've discovered that if I take the time to re-record a piece a second time, say one or two weeks later, it usually comes out much better. One of the Grieg LPs I have recently done (Op.12/4, Alfedans) has been recorded not less than four times (maybe five I can't remember) in a month's span, because I didn't manage to play the staccato lightly enough. I haven't been working on it in the meanwhile, just have let it rest, studying other things and now I'm quite pleased with the result. In my opinion, when we think a piece is ready (note-wise), we should put it aside for a few days and only later do the recording.
     

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