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Intonation of a piano?

Discussion in 'The Piano' started by bclever, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. bclever

    bclever New Member

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    In a recent (now locked thread) someone asked what intonation of a piano means.
    Intonation refers to the relative tuning temperament of the strings
    (as in the Well-Tempered Clavier). The definition that was provided in the now locked
    thread really refers to "voicing", not intonation. Unless I'm wrong that is. :)
     
  2. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    I think you are right. The definition of intonation in one of the music dictionaries is: the degree to which the pitch of a note heard is what is correct but not to the degree that the note heard is the wrong note. (that one is sort of weird) Here's an simpler one: A term referring to the proper production of a tone so that it is exactly in tune.

    To me, voicing means adjusting the hammers to hit the strings a certain way. Pricking the hammers with needles is to soften or scrape the felt so that the sound hitting the strings is less harsh. I think either Horowitz or Rubinstein was particularly picky as to how their pianos were voiced - Zimerman too, I hear. Probably all of the pros are. I’d like to be but don’t have the patience to work on every hammer.
     
  3. PJF

    PJF New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Yes, if someone were singing off-key, you could say the singer had problems with his/her intonation.
    I drive my piano technician mad with my constant finagling with the piano's voicing. My ears are too sensitive for their own good. :lol:
     

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