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Discussion in 'General' started by Horowitzian, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Let me partially amend my reply: to me, it is just the opposite.

    Your crystal ball is quite talkative, isn't it? Did you know that Chopin himself was pretty a tame guy? :p
     
  2. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Are you really sure you're pinpointing the cause of your proficiency? :wink:

    Look at what kind of mechanism you develop practicing what is pompously called "The virtuoso pianist", then consider the endless piano literature and what it asks for (even in the easiest pieces). "Hanon" is little more than 5-finger mindless exercises in parallel motion. Pretty useless under every respect.

    No injuries in my case, luckly I've never had problems of that kind. On the other hand, I've never overdone piano practice so I don't feel I'm especially smart about it.
     
  3. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    Indeed. I also know that he preferred the way Liszt played his music, so long as he played what was on the page. :lol:
     
  4. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    AFAIK, Chopin admired the way Liszt played the Etudes. The Nocturnes were Chopin's realm and nobody else's.
     
  5. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    I don't recall having read that, but I trust you. I do know that he didn't like the way other people played the mazurkas, though. 8)
     
  6. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    I'm glad to hear you didn't have any injuries. 8)

    Since I was a rather late beginner, Hanon combined with scales, arpeggios, and basic harmony helped me overcome those missed years of early training. Even so, like I said, YMMV.:wink:
     
  7. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    I always have wondered what he would have thought of Horowitz's playing of Mazurkas. 8)
     
  8. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Performance-wise Chopin's Mazurkas are still a mistery today.
     
  9. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    Yah, Chopin always said that the manner of playing them was a Polish thing (imagine that).

    Has anyone heard Zimerman play mazurkas? I've only seen him play the bigger stuff, but speaking of the bigger stuff, he's of course done the concertos with the PFO, and the 3rd movement of the F minor concerto is a bit mazurkish in places, and he seems to have experimented with that Polish way of interpreting them in that movement.
     
  10. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Check this out, Terez:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmKlYayg ... s&hl=en&q=


    He could be Chopin, himself! [​IMG] (except I don't like some of the facial expressions)
     
  11. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Yes, there's an old DG disc with Op. 24 Nos.1-2-4 (and the video from the 1975 Chopin Competition Monica's already indicated). If you want to listen to some really extraordinary interpretations of them go to YT and look for Ignaz Friedman. His Mazurkas are one of a kind and in my opinion he gives a possible account of that famous "Polish" thing you mentioned.
     
  12. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    He seems to mostly use a straight 3 tempo throughout that one. In the 3rd movement of the f minor concerto, he doesn't.

    I'm listening to one of them now (63/3), but it seems to be straight 3 also.

    Both interpretations are nice, but I still think Zimerman's interpretation of the 3rd movement of the f minor concerto is the only one that deviates from a strict meter. I can't get the Meyerbeer scenario out of my head...but I'm definitely willing to accept that the meter deviation could have been a lot subtler than the Meyerbeer anecdote implies (that would certainly explain why Chopin was originally so frustrated with Meyerbeer's insistence that Chopin played his mazurkas in 4).
     
  13. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Persevere, not all the Mazurkas are born equal. Some are more "Polish" than others. Try this one:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2s9BJBwlv0
     
  14. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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  15. alf

    alf Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Juufie, you're right, Rubinstein sounds much more polished than Friedman.
     
  16. Terez

    Terez New Member

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    Yeah, that's more like what Zimerman did in the concerto.

    :lol:
     
  17. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    I have recently begun to seriously study/listen to Rubinstein's playing of the mazurkas. And trying to imitate him the best I can - something that is impossible to get perfected, but it has helped me, anyway.

    But doesn't Zimerman look a lot like Chopin! I'm thinking body-double with that earlier video.
     
  18. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    :lol:
     

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