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Grieg's concerto: the difficulty and the best edition?

Discussion in 'Repertoire' started by hyenal, Aug 3, 2012.

  1. hyenal

    hyenal New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi, my dear PS friends,
    Yesterday I encountered a stupid thought - I want to learn the Grieg concerto. It's stupid in many ways, since I have no time to practice nowadays, I have no oppotunity to play with an orchestra at all (that is, learning a solo work would be more rewarding) and I guess it's very hard, even though it is said to belong to the "easy" concerti. But how much hard? - is my first question. The only concerto I learned is Schumann's and it was very hard for me.
    Even if I cannot start learning that concerto now, I would like to know which editions are recommendable, or which is known as the best. Can anyone help me?
     
  2. andrew

    andrew Member Piano Society Artist

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    I had a look at this many years ago. I'd suggest you start with the first movement cadenza and if you can handle it you'll be fine; if it presents problems maybe reconsider. There is a Percy Grainger version of the first movement for solo piano - unfortunately it's blocked on IMSLP and I can't get it via scorser; if you can find it in a specialist shop it might be worth looking into. I've played his piano only arrangement of Rach 2 and whilst, iirc, it was a somewhat condensed version, it was still fun to play around with.
     
  3. musical-md

    musical-md New Member

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    I agree regarding the cadenza. Also, the double 3rds and arabesque figures just before them in the first movement. As for editions, I don't worry too much about that for concertos; just get whatever is most affordable. :wink:
     
  4. hyenal

    hyenal New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Andrew, Eddy, thank you very much for your very practical advises!
    @Andrew: I didn' know that there are arrangements of concertos for solo piano! Thank you for the information.
    This recording seems to be the realisation of that arrangement: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QqqKQILSr44&feature=player_embedded#!

    @Eddy: In case of solo works there are many recommedations which edition is better etc. Is there a special reason that it's not the case with concertos? Just wondering.
    And what are "arabesque figures"? I googled with those words, found some usages, but not the meaning or examples :(
    Maybe this?
     
  5. musical-md

    musical-md New Member

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    No score with me but I think it's 8 bars ahead (or 2 bars prior to the descending double 3rds), but the section you show is a bit tricky too. Play it like you're touching a hot iron, with all the 32nd notes played just like the first grace (acciacatura) note that starts it. :wink:
     

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