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Granados - Danza lenta, and Schumann - Romance

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by pianolady, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    A B-flat would make sense too. Maybe a G-sharp AND a B-flat. I'm sure Granados tried all kinds of possibilities. Isn't it funny how one little half-step can matter so much? Just like the Chopin Prelude....
     
  2. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Well, my expert friend just told me that it is supposed to be a G-natural. That's the way Granados himself played it shortly before his death.
    A. de Larrocha is the one who changed the note to a G-sharp.
    I've now changed my recording to reflect this issue.

    (grrr...I hate when I'm wrong.... :x :) )
     
  3. rainer

    rainer New Member

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    Well, perhaps your friend is right, but AdL was an expert too. On what basis can we choose whose expertise to respect more than the other's, and how does your friend know how Granados played it, and why didn't AdL?

    Anyway, I've been starting to play this piece, and the more I play it, the more I like it. I'm sure you know the feeling. But the more I get to know it, the more I notice when things are not quite as I expect them to be. Where passages recur, they are sometimes identical, sometimes not. When they're different, sometimes the differences are obvious mistakes, sometimes they are almost certainly intentional, and at other times one just can't tell, and when that happens, given the unreliability of some of these editions, I'll perhaps too quickly jump to the conclusion that what's in the score is wrong.

    OK, so I'm looking at the version from imslp. There are little things which are obvious mistakes, quite apart from the grammatical error in the title (españoles should be españolas).

    Take bars 54 and 55 (top line of 3rd page). It seems pretty clear that these two bars which are almost identical should really be completely identical, specifically the 6 groups of 4 grace notes should all be D-F#-A-B, but the second group has a G instead of the F#.

    Look at the four "molto ad lib" sections ending in a 2/4 bar. All four of these 2/4 bars (28, 35, 53, and 61) are completely identical. Now focus on the 3/4 bars immediately in front of each of the 2/4 bars (i.e. bars 27, 34, 52, and 60); they are identical except for two differences: One is that in 27 and 52 there is a trill while in 34 and 60 there is not. I'd say this difference is likely to be deliberate. The other is that 27, unlike the other three, omits the tie on the LH high G, and I suggest this is a misprint. Next, focus on the upbeats to these 3/4 bars (i.e. the last beats of bars 26, 33, 51, and 59). In bar 51 the legend "molto ad lib" is missing, presumably unintentionally. The last 8th-note chord is identical on all four occasions (in 33 there is a reminder sharp sign on the F# because there were F naturals in 31 and 32, and the lowest 3 notes aren't always printed in the same staves, but the actual notes are all identical). In the penultimate 8th-note chord it gets complicated: it's different every time, and I'm not sure what to make of this. The first instance (bar 26) has a C# in the RH where all the others have a B. Mistake? The last instance(bar 59) omits the lower G. Mistake? Apart from the differences already mentioned, the basic notes in this chord are (bottom to top) C#-G-A-B-G, but in 33 there is an extra lower-staff chord G-B-C#-E (the C# duplicating one in the higher-staff), and I'm wondering whether this may also be a mistake.

    Here's more: See how the passage from (the 2nd beat of) bar 10 to (the end of) bar 20 is note for note identical to the passage from bar 36 to bar 46? Well, it isn't. One difference is that high E and D are added across the 44/45 bar line (presumably deliberately). Another is on the last RH 8th notes of 14 (B-E) and 15 (E) which differ from how they are in 40 (F#) and 41 (B-E). My suspicion is that 14/15 and 40/41 should be alike, and that 40/41 are correct, and therefore 15 should have the B added and 14 should have F# instead of B-E. With this in mind, I listened to a few YT recordings, and found that two of them do in fact play an F# in bar 14, one of them being AdL! It really made me feel good to find my humble intuition confirmed by someone like that.
     
  4. luissarro

    luissarro New Member

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    Hi, Monica!

    This is a nice romanze!
    The danza is very interesting also!
     
  5. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Thank you, Luis! :)

    I chose 'my' expert, because he really is THE Granados expert! His expertise is equal to that of AdL (or maybe even higher). He is the same man I mentioned earlier, the one who worked closely with AdL for years on the new Boiler edition books. He knows everything about Granados - something even Granados' daughter claims is true.

    I'm not going to repeat my conversation with him, but basically AdL changed that note to make the passage sound more conventional. It is a G-natural in the original manuscript. Regarding 'knowing' what Granados played - my friend mentioned the piano rolls that Granados recorded in New York just before his death. And just a moment ago, I light bulb went off in my head and I remembered that I actually have that recording on my computer! The whole "Masters of the Roll" album. I forgot all about it!!! Wow!!! Now I just listened to Granados himself play Danza lenta and it is just the neatest and nicest thing ever!!!! You should hear his trills...OMG, they are so fast and clean. And yes, he plays a G-natural!

    Regarding the other issues you mentioned -- you are correct that it should be an F-sharp on the last top note of bar 14. Those chords before the molto ad lib. -- don't worry about them. What you see in the IMSLP score is correct and how Granados plays them. However, he does trill ALL spots right before the 2/4 bars. The 4 little grace note runs, you are correct that they should be identical - I had already caught that one myself too.

    Well, now I will have to re-re-record myself playing this piece so as to make those corrections. But it's still okay because I still love "Danza lenta". And you know...it's been a while since I've been so immersed in one piece like this. It's fun! Especially a piece like "Danza lenta" - it's only three pages and sounds so beautiful and makes you feel so good, etc.... :)
     
  6. rainer

    rainer New Member

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    Thanks for clearing that up, Monica, it's always interesting to get a bit of the background associated with such little details. What luck to have such an expert among your friends!
     
  7. troglodyte

    troglodyte Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    I love the Schumann Romance and you play it beautifully. It is quite difficult to bring out and requires lots of concentration. I recall when I was young my teacher assigned this to me and warned me that it is more difficult than it appears. I didn't think so and promptly played it for her after a few weeks. Her reaction was unexpected: she declared this piece obviously too difficult for me right now. Instead we proceeded to the Waldstein sonata! This is just to show there are different kinds of difficulties. But you play it as if there are none!
     
  8. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Cute story, Joachim. And thank you! :)

    Maybe this recording came out okay because I had the music memorized. I actually tried to make a video-recording, but everything went wrong. I got frustrated, gave up, and settled for just the audio recording.
     

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