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Granados - Cuentos de la juventud, Op. 1

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by redgoriya, Aug 25, 2009.

  1. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Ok, I give up. :) I will have more time tomorrow, so I'll play through no. 4 and 6 again while thinking of the things you said.
     
  2. redgoriya

    redgoriya New Member

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    Tee hee hee!

    +j
     
  3. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Ok, I have taken some time this morning to play through no. 4 and 6 again.

    No. 4 – Since you said the word “riddle” – that totally piqued my interest and so I looked for that riddle in bar 3. But I don’t I get it. I do play that 1st inversion C chord with my LH on the E – is that what you mean? And just now by concentrating on that note, it naturally led me to play in the next bar the RH treble F louder. I don’t think I ever did that before, so that was kind of neat. If I were to re-record this, I would play it like that.

    No. 6 – A very peaceful little piece, indeed. I still don’t have much to say about it, though, except after reading your ideas about it, I think I now play it better. I should consult with you on every Granados piece I take on in the future!



    A slight change of subject – the Scarlatti transcriptions: Have you played any of them? I have not. But I’ve been thinking about playing an original Scarlatti sonata and paring it with the Granados transcription to see how they compare. Not sure which one to choose first, though.
     
  4. redgoriya

    redgoriya New Member

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    Thanks for taking the time to go through them again!

    As for no. 4, the riddle is how to voice that C major chord so that it makes sense on its own and in the context of the phrase. The bass note drops out completely on that chord, and cannot be held over from the pedal -- that would be cheating! So how do you voice that chord and interpret it dynamically and rhythmicall so that it makes sense? And what consequences does that have for the way one plays the preceding and subsequent bars.

    There is a similar issue two bars before Tempo I, near the end of the piece.

    These are the sort of considerations that always come up with Granados's part-writing. Even great works like the Seis Piezas (which I performed in recital in the spring, incidentally!), or the Escenas Románticas have very straightforward voice-leading. That is what makes those pieces so much easier to interpret than, say, the Escenas Poéticas.

    In my opinion! :)

    Again, I have seen the Scarlatti arrangements on IMSLP, but not played them. I adore Scarlatti, though.

    I'm off to have an organ lesson. Talk to you later!

    +j
     
  5. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Well, I have just come home from my morning run and have picked out my next Granados piece: the very first Scarlatti transcription! It passed my iPod test! :wink: I put some new tunes on my iPod to take with me on my run and if a certain piece keeps my interest all the way through, then I know that I would like to learn it. I really like this transcription in G major. I’ve printed out the original Scarlatti sonata and Granados’ transcription and can’t wait to try them out! So exciting – I love getting into new music! :D

    And btw – I also listened to the Cant de les Estrelles on my run. I listen to it often when I run by the river. The beauty of the music and of the scenery inspires me to ‘keep going’.

    How long have you been playing organ?
     
  6. redgoriya

    redgoriya New Member

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    I can't say I'm much for jogging. Too much repetitive smashing of the knees, not enough variability. I like wild play, like short sprinting and rolling in a park. Climbing something if possible!

    I've been playing organ for two years, but essentially it's like having played for 0. Or maybe some negative number of years. I was thrown into the job with no formal training save a few lessons, and learned on the job. On the way I picked up some bad habits, and failed to develop crucial beginning aspects of pedal technique. So I'm doing a lot of UN-learning and RE-learning... but isn't so much of life like that?

    I'm working on the "Little" G minor fugue, which has been a favorite piece of mine for close to 20 years. I can't believe I'm finally coming to play it. It was also a favorite piece of a friend of mine, who was my best friend for close to 20 years, but who died accidentally last summer. His 27th birthday would have been tomorrow.

    This afternoon's plans: Take a stroll in the gorgeous fall weather in Montreal (it hit us all of a sudden a few days ago), get some delicious grilled meat from a street vendor, then come back home and listen to Bach's B minor mass... for the first time in my life. That's right.

    +j
     
  7. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Sorry about your friend. That's rough.

    Are you having weird weather too? For us, last week was in the upper 80's and this week is barely hitting 70-degrees. Feels like October instead of August. I kind of like it though. And I'm sure it will heat back up one of these days. Still, the whole summer was strange - makes me wonder about winter...

    About Bach - I cannot comment much on the subject (don't ask), so can we go back to Granados? :lol: And I have just played through those two pieces that I mentioned last time and they are darling! I am thoroughly enjoying my time at the piano today.
     
  8. redgoriya

    redgoriya New Member

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    Well I won't ask about Bach, but let me tell you my story.

    I have basically had little to no formal training at the piano. Between the ages of 5 and 12, I had a "teacher" who in fact was not a piano teacher at all. That entire time we did nothing but scale exercises, some Hanon, and some of the Alfred/Bastien pedagogical books. I didn't play a single classical piece of music.

    When I was 12, I had a real teacher for a year. She gave me my first piece, the Bach F major invention. My second piece was the easy C major sonata by Mozart. I then started exploring Chopin's mazurkas and polonaises, and she could see that I needed a better teacher. I never got one. (I'm now 27.)

    I did, however, attend a music-oriented high school in Los Angeles. I had no lessons there, but I constantly had an opportunity to play for others, play with others, to be pushed to think about and play music!

    As a result, I became very good at sight-reading, but very poor at learning. And obviously I stayed away from what was hardest: Bach. But over the years, I've come to realize how important the ability to play Bach is.

    To be quite honest, I really suck at playing Bach. Two years ago I conceived a project where each day I would learn a piece of Bach's, maybe a prelude, maybe a fugue, maybe a courante. But one a day, until I worked through all of Bach's keyboard music. I still think that'd be a great idea, and I'm working towards it: I'm slowly collecting good editions of all Bach's keyboard music. I'm almost there: I need WTC Book II, the Toccatas, and all the assorted pieces. This year will be a good year. I think, through playing the organ, that I'm finally starting to get it.

    It's grueling. I spent an hour on a measure last night. I felt sure I was getting nowhere. But today I played that fugue for my teacher and, unbelievably, I could play it almost all the way through, at a good tempo, with all the articulation. It pays off. And it is so worth it.

    It is sort of like that with Chopin's fourth ballade. It is a work I never thought I'd every play. And for the last 15 years, I've been working on it a little at a time. Every few years, I'd get a new section learned. Well, last year, I finally learned it. To be able to play that piece through, from start to finish, in a way that spoke to me musically, was one of the crowning experiences of my lifetime. This is how music is one of the most empowering and liberating forces in our lives.

    And that is how I hope it will be with Bach.

    +j
     

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