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Franz Liszt - Sonata in B minor, played by liszt1970

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by liszt1970, May 22, 2008.

  1. liszt1970

    liszt1970 New Member

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    This is an unedited, live recording from my performance about 3 years ago of Liszt's Sonata in B minor. As fate would have it, the recording engineer ran out of space on his CD recorder just as the final chords were to resolve this tremendous work. You cannot imagine how disappointed I was. In a way, however, it's pretty cool, if you think about it, that the piece sort of just ascends into the heavens, without there being an end. (Maybe it's just positive thinking... :) )

    I know there was recently an upload of this work, but I thought my performance might also have something to say.

    Thank you,

    Alexander


    Liszt - Piano Sonata in B minor
     
  2. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    So that's how it is supposed to sound! :wink: :wink:


    Your playing is outstanding. I feel like I could 'climb every mountain and ford every stream' after listening to this. (How in the heck could Brahms fall asleep during a performance of this piece? Maybe during those oh-so-beautiful parts, but still....)

    So it's the last chord (B major?) that is missing at the very end. I'm sure people who know this piece will notice, but everything else is so good. Chris/Robert - can we put this up anyway?
     
  3. nathanscoleman

    nathanscoleman New Member Piano Society Artist

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    *sighing in rapturous afterglow* that was stunning!!!!

    OK, it's official, I'm now cyber-stalking you ... sorry, Mon, but it's the Sonata to end all Sonatas!

    I'd like to wax poetic for a just a bit about the piece first, if you'll bear with me. This sonata is, for me, the reason Liszt is still with us. It shows how profoundly deep and meaningful his soul really was, in spite of the rhapsodies and other extroverted pieces. I am continually amazed at how personal this sonata is. It allows the inner being of the pianist to shine thru, which is an amazing feat considering the ridiculous technical demands on the performer. But every performance of this is individual and unique. It's truly stunning how Liszt was able to accomplish this, and we can only wish more of his music reached this pinnacle of artistry and divine inspiration. Then his genius truly would be undisputed.

    This piece sits on my piano top at all times, not because I practice it everyday, but because it's where I want to be (in a few decades, if I practice hard and pray and be a good boy :) ). It's refreshing to hear another pianist approach it with the reverence it really deserves, and thank you alexander for sharing this with us. This performance to me shows you to be a rather restrained individual, someone who really lives in your innerspace. And, although unusual for me, really worked well with Liszt. There were several moments that are amazing. That fermata hold right before you enter into the 1st andante sostenuto sent chills up my spine. and then the following phrases literally made me tear up a bit. Not actually cry, I am a man after all! :p

    And let's not forget the entrance of 2nd theme in the grandioso! Oh My God ... I'm having those really awesome aftershocks of a really good 'session'. (don't picture it, it's lurid and gross :oops: ) But I have to say, the sonorities you built up there with your, not to be overlooked, really superior pedal usage were a religious experience.

    And the final restatement of the 'fate knocking' motif, truly inspired. And oh that fatal missing last chord! *shaking hand furiously at the heavens* you fickle fate!!!

    In any case, I'm keeping this recording forever and you can't take it back from me! :p I can't imagine a recording of this quality will go un-uploaded to the site just because of that ***ble***ep***i**ng sound technician! :roll:

    So, anyway, how do you wanna do this stalking thing? Shall I make inappropriate innuendos and you pretend to ignore them? :D

    Wait, a technical question ... in my edition of the sonata, those opening descending octaves? the three first G octaves? My score has them connected by a pedal mark terminates on the F octave, even thought they're separated by rests. I notice a lot of pedal markings similar to this in Liszt's music. You, and every other recording I own, detach those first three octaves. Is there a reason for that? historical precedent? I'm just curious.





    and way OT - I notice you won the Wideman Competition in Shreveport!!! in 1998!!! I was here then ... I don't remember if I went that year or not. But I probably did since it was pre-children. Just think, we may have breathed the same air!!! (ok, that was even a bit too stalk-y for me) Anyway, what concerto did you perform? I'm trying to jog my memory, but that was 10 years ago.
     
  4. hyenal

    hyenal New Member Piano Society Artist

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    I really want to listen to this after I've hear you from the stormy Liszt yesterday and read Nathan's exciting review now. But 26 MB is simply too big for the slow internet at my home :(
    But definitely I'll listen to it and experience the furor which Nathan and Monica described when I go to school or the library!!!
     
  5. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    This is up, Alexander. :)
     
  6. hyenal

    hyenal New Member Piano Society Artist

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    ... And I finally listened to this! :D
    IMHO the most impressive thing in your interpretation is that you make the structure of this piece stand out very clearly and though succeeded in showing your finest individualiy and sensitivity within this structure. Thanks for sharing this and I'm really looking forward to hear more of you!
    (But how unfortunate we are that we can't hear this to the end... :( Perhaps someone was jealous of your talent!)
     
  7. Casper89

    Casper89 Member Piano Society Artist

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    Damn....really very good. How much time did it take you to learn this monster?? :lol:
     
  8. liszt1970

    liszt1970 New Member

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    Wow, I'm really glad everyone liked it. I think this is one of the greatest sonatas ever written.

    Sorry about not replying until now. Things have been really busy lately.

    Nathanscoleman, thank you for your thoughts about this work. I am very much in agreement with you about your feelings about this sonata. Regarding the first 3 G octaves opening the piece, none of the editions I have has a pedal mark under them, just wedge staccatos under the first 2, and then a slur from the 3rd G octave all the way until the A-flat in the 3rd measure. May I ask what edition it is that has the pedal mark under them? Edited by whom?

    Regarding the Wideman Competition, I was actually not THE winner; I think it was an "honorable mention" or something like that. I remember it was an "award," but I don't remember what it was called specifically. So, unfortunatey, I did not get the chance to perform a concerto with the symphony. Nevertheless, I really enjoyed Shreveport. I stayed with the Psalmon's- do you know them?

    Hyenal, thank you for your comments. I find that structure is so important and am glad that my playing showed that to some degree.

    Casper89, yes, it is a monster. I would say it took me a good 2 months to get a decent first learning of the basics of the work, and then a few months to get some conception of what it's all about and how I'd like to present it. I then put it away for a few months and started up on it again with a fresh outlook. Of course, I don't think I really have it "learned" even now. There is always something new to be discovered in great music such as this.

    Alexander
     

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