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Fast Octaves

Discussion in 'Technique' started by Anonymous, Jan 25, 2007.

  1. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    A lot of pieces that i play seem to demand fast octave/large chord playing and i have to admit i am struggling a bit. Has anyone got any hints or tips to help me improve my technique and allow me to play them basically as fast as normal passage work. I'm sure I'm doing something wrong...cheers
     
  2. rachmaninoff

    rachmaninoff New Member Piano Society Artist

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    do it very slow and let the key puch your finger up... after a couple of days you can improve your speed and its really important that you don't have any tension in your wrist (I had some troubles with it for 2 months!)
     
  3. MindenBlues

    MindenBlues New Member Piano Society Artist

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    If you need to play chromatic octave runs it is perhaps helpful (and sounds better) if you alternate the fingering between pinky and 4th finger, sometimes even with 3rd finger while moving from one octave note to the next. So that you have a leading voice, capable to play legato and fast (because of finger alternating), while the thumb just moves along. For RH and LH it's the same.
     
  4. Biggemski

    Biggemski New Member

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    Hi, octave runs practice with first and fifth ( 4 ) finger separately, then play it commonly with two fingers. Start with few chords and practice it, get it to tempo, think about its like one fluent movement,then add next chord, and next chord ...
     
  5. rachmaninoff

    rachmaninoff New Member Piano Society Artist

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    could you explain why with 1 and 4th finger??
     
  6. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    I think because it gives a chance for the muscles which operate the 5th finger a chance to "rest". Since that your 4th finger is much stronger than the 5th you can go for a lot longer playing octaves with the 1st and 4th.

    But the only problem is trying to train yourself playing with the 4th finger. At first it seems uncomfortable and you will sometimes slip and play a 7th instead of an 8th or sometimes you will play two notes with the 4th finger.

    I still can't "perfect" that technique. ...someday....just someday :D
     
  7. MindenBlues

    MindenBlues New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Beside what juufa said, it is so that if you like to play octave runs legato, you have no other choice! You need to take the pinky, ring finger alternating so that at least one note of the both are executed legato. Or even the middle finger too, alternating between pinky + thumb, ring finger + thumb, middle finger + thumb (if the reach is enough for an octave for middle finger + thumb).
     
  8. rachmaninoff

    rachmaninoff New Member Piano Society Artist

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    I tried to do the 4 but there is so much more tension.... in my hand
     
  9. Chaotica

    Chaotica New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Try using the 4th for black keys. This should create much less tension compared to doing all of them with the weak 5th, besides the legato issue MindenBlues stated. At least it does for me, though I'm no virtuoso, you must know.
     
  10. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Oh and another reason why the 4th finger is useful:


    Play a F octave with your left hand using the 1st and 5th fingers. Now notice that it will take a couple more milliseconds for you to lift your 5th finger up to the F#. Your 4th finger is at an advantage to play the F# because it is a lot closer to it than the 5th finger.

    Hope this made sense.
     
  11. Chaotica

    Chaotica New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Yes, this is what I wanted to say. :wink:
     
  12. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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  13. Anonymous

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    Wow thats fast! :eek: He looks like that old superhero The Flash :wink:
     
  14. hunwoo

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    Practice slowly and absolute relaxation on your wrist (actually your whole arm) :)
     
  15. rachmaninoff

    rachmaninoff New Member Piano Society Artist

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    I practiced the 4th finger method. you can do it in 30 minutes and then you can speed up. it really works!
     
  16. Anonymous

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    indeed ... relaxation is the key to fast octaves... but does the type of the piano (grand or upright) affects?
     
  17. johnmar78

    johnmar78 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    not really, a reasonable good piano-upright,,can acheive almost the speed of grand, any faster,,is that necessary..I doubt that would make any better. but perhaps for your own ego and satisfaction... But what affects the speed is the key weight and resistance. like mine is 10% heavier and modified. so if i play on standard grand or upright. I can PLAY faster... I hope this helps....
     
  18. Adam

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    Mega bump!

    As of lately, I've been practicing Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody and during the final ~2 minutes you have to play lots of octaves at a high speed. However, even when practicing relatively slowly my hand starts to hurt due to the repetitive motion. How exactly can I relax my wrist ( while having a rather small hand ) and still play these octaves?
     
  19. johnmar78

    johnmar78 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    no woories adam, small hands,,,,just like mine....I will prove to you something in near future taht a small hands could do.

    You need to cheat by switching your playing from using fingers instead of USING YOUR UPPER BODY WEIGHT..another words, lean the fingers on the keys with body weight behind it....its NO EFFORT at all. Sometimes you need to switch your wrist to finger or arm weight..body. By switching or alternating in between all your body parts can reduce lots of stress......di you get it>???or pm me.

    Unfortunately, or fortuatelly, I rarely use wrist to play octves..I keep it as last resort,,,
     
  20. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Just out of interest, is that #6 or #4 ?
     

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