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Debussy, La Soiree dans Grenade

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by Rachfan, Jul 6, 2009.

  1. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Pantelis,

    I'm glad you didn't find my explanation too convoluted! :lol: I just had a moment to go back to that and I made a few light edits for the sake of readability.

    David
     
  2. musicusblau

    musicusblau Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Rachfan wrote:
    Yes, I personally second that. But also this depends of your personality, if you are someone, who values the subject (the personality) higher than the objectivity. There are others, who say, that we have to strive for the largest objectivity and that only this can be absolute. The others consider the personality (subjectivity) for the highest and valuable aspect.

    Above we were talking about musicality and interpretation, but, of course, there are also more "objective" matters in music, f.ex. if we play the notes, which are in the score, if we play the eigth double fastly as the quarters and such "simple things", which a beginner has to learn first.
     
  3. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Andreas,

    I agree with your observations. There has to be a delicate balance whereby the intent of the composer is fully served, yet through the prism of the artist in recreating the music. And, of course, we pianists ideally should think of ourselves as being a transparent medium to the extent possible between the composer and the audience.

    Here is an interesting observation that has always been true. If you ask any six fine pianists to prepare and play the same piece objectively with scrupulous attention to details, usually you will hear six noticeably differing performances! The fundamentals of playing the piece will have been the same, such as the correct notes for instance, yet the overall effect turns out to be a bit different each time. It's not that they tried to be different; rather it's better explained by the fact that subtle differences in perspectives and musical judgments impact the listener differently. Thus a bit of the pianist's individuality unavoidably becames part of any rendition. In no case, however, can personality be permitted to dominate a performance--or to any degree where it robs the composer of his genius and intent. But subtle personality-induced differences will always be present among and between pianists. That's why none of us ever need to worry about sounding exactly alike, which is a good thing. Otherwise, recitals would be perpetually boring! These differences represent the bringing of new insights to old scores, which probably accounts for the evolution of performance practices over time.

    David
     
  4. musicusblau

    musicusblau Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    I agree to all your thoughts, David. Thank you!
     

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