Thank you to those who donated to Piano Society in 2017.

Curious site

Discussion in 'Useful resources' started by richard66, Mar 10, 2011.

  1. musical-md

    musical-md Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Physician, Chief Medical Officer
    Location:
    Biloxi, MS, USA
    Last Name:
    Del Rio
    First Name:
    Eddy
    Alexander,
    Most insightful! I really like this.
    Well, not for me :lol: . It has several challenging passages. But just like the work for violin, it's not all difficult.
    This is absolutely true. However, I see it this way, Bach was inspired to compose a work much larger than the instrument he was writing for at the moment. The amazing thing (IMHO) about the Chaconne, in fact regarding much of Bach's oeuvre, is that it transcends the medium. This Chaconne, for example is a moving and beautiful work whether performed on violin, piano, guitar or orchestra. I can imagine it beautifully arranged for a capella choir and thus being performed by living-instruments! This aspect, argues against Rosen's point.
    I leave you with this little test (?). :wink: In the "quasi Tromboni" D Major section (but before the "Allegro moderato ma deciso") in both the Busoni transcription and original violin score, there are two adjacent melody notes that struck me as peculiarly un-Bach-like in melodic shape. As I investigated it I discovered that given the limitations of the violin, Bach had no choice but to write it that way. However, given the ample resources of the piano, I re-score the two notes in question to what I believe Bach would have written if he had not suffered the instrumental limitation. Can you identify what two notes these might be? :)
     
  2. richard66

    richard66 Richard Willmer Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Messages:
    1,081
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Amateur musician
    Home Page:
    Bach pushed the violin to its limits with the Chaconne, while Brahms transcription limits the technical resources, because the violin can achieve much more; here is the difference. But what matters is the beauty of the Chaconne and this warrants its being played, be it on the violin, the harpsichord or the 'cello.

    If we reason like this, then we cannot play Beethoven with a modern piano, seeing that he pushed his instrument to its limits while nowadays a pianist worth his salt will have to hold back here and there.
     
  3. musical-md

    musical-md Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Physician, Chief Medical Officer
    Location:
    Biloxi, MS, USA
    Last Name:
    Del Rio
    First Name:
    Eddy
    OMG, yes! How could I forget this? :roll:
     
  4. Rachfan

    Rachfan Active Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,153
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Chief Operating Officer, retired
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    Last Name:
    April
    First Name:
    David
    Theodore Edel's Piano Music for One Hand is an excellent resource for those interested in the genre. The book covers virtually all the bases. I don't play any music for one hand, but if I were to do so, this unique repertoire guide would reveal a whole new world in the piano literature.

    Link: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Music-Hand- ... 930&sr=1-1

    David
     

Share This Page