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Convolution reverb for Mac?

Discussion in 'Useful resources' started by Horowitzian, Mar 7, 2010.

  1. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    I know this may have been touched on, but I'm too tired to search through the archives. :lol:

    Anyone know of a (preferably open-source) convolution reverb app or plugin that works on Mac? I ran across several MBs of impulse responses I have the other day which reminded me of my failed attempt to find one that works some time ago. :| Whichever one I tried did not work...any ideas?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    IIRC, it was 'LAconvolver' or something similar that I tried.
     
  3. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    It really depends how much you want to spend, Horowitzian. The finest software based convolution reverb is the Altiverb 6. Version 7 will be coming out shortly. Another excellent choice is Lexicon PCM based reverb. But, these are pricey.

    I own a Mac too, but if you're using the Mac for your DAW, the reverb in Logic Pro or Soundtrack Pro is not that great.

    The best hardware reverb is the Bricasti M7 which is 6x times the price of software based reverbs.

    Lately, I've been using the Lexicon Pantheon found in my Calkwalk Sonar 6 DAW.
     
  4. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    Yeah, so many reverbs are more oriented towards pop style productions or guitars rather than sounding completely natural, like we want for classical recording.

    Software is definitely what I'm looking for, since I really don't need a top end rackmount unit.
     
  5. Dave Ferris

    Dave Ferris New Member

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    I'll second that Bricasti M7 ! It's not cheap but it totally redefines any impressions you might have about the term "reverb". It's not your typical verb you hear in a rock track on drums or a pop vocalist---much deeper.

    A friend just bought one. He does some film scoring with the vst plugs and the occasional solo piano track with Ivory. He's used the Altiverb for awhile now but says the Bricasti takes his stuff to a whole other level. I'm trying to get him to lend it to me for a day to see what it sounds like on the D.

    I have to get my Tascam recorder back first so I haven't been thinking about it too much lately. When I do I'll try and make a track with it if I can pry the Bricasti out of his hands. :)
     
  6. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    Thanks guys...however I think the Bricasti unit is a little outside of what I want to spend. :lol:
     
  7. Dave Ferris

    Dave Ferris New Member

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    Yeah, it's WAY up there for sure. I could see spending the dough MAYBE if you were real busy writing and scoring for films but just for casual piano recordings, you'd have to have to be a pretty over the top recording hobbyist.
     
  8. Marik

    Marik New Member

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    Hi Horowitzian,

    Of course, the software is much more convinient, but I don't think even the best software reverbs can touch a stand alone unit. Indeed, briscati7 is a nice piece of equipment, however, you pay for it. One of the best hardware units for piano is Kurzweil Rumour. Can be had for under $500, but shares the same engine as an expensive KSP8. Might be a biggest bargain and has lots of very nice (completely controllable) presets, from Abby Road Piano Hall, to all kinds of "sweet", "delicate" "bright" halls of different sizes. Also has parametric 3 band EQ. Check it out.

    FWIW.

    Best, M
     
  9. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    Not a bad idea...thanks for the hint! More to think about. :)
     

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