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Concert Upright

Discussion in 'The Piano' started by YoungPianoVirtuoso, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. YoungPianoVirtuoso

    YoungPianoVirtuoso New Member

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    I've heard that there is a such thing as a concert upright piano. Does anyone know what they look like :?:
     
  2. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    They look like this.
     
  3. YoungPianoVirtuoso

    YoungPianoVirtuoso New Member

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    :shock: :?
     
  4. musical-md

    musical-md Active Member

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    No, that's not a concert upright. Simply, it is an upright that goes beyond the height of a studio upright, in the order of 52-60+" tall. Spinet -> Console -> Studio -> Upright-Grand.
     
  5. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    I stand corrected :lol:
     
  6. Didier

    Didier Member Piano Society Artist

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    The best (and highest) one is the Steingraeber 138. I think that if you did not tested it, you can hardly imagine how good an upright piano can be.

    [​IMG]

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    Also available in all-black version. :D
    [​IMG]
     
  7. RSPIll

    RSPIll New Member

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    All of the different names for upright and grand pianos are marketing. A vertical piano around over 42" high is marketed as a "studio", "upright grand", "concert", "artist", "parlor" (blah blah blah.) -- then there is the spinet, which should never be considered on any level. In grands there are, "petite" or "salon" grands, "parlor" grands, "baby" grands, studio grands, concert, "Imperial", and on and on.

    In the grands "petite", "salon", "parlor" was to give the impression that you COULD fit it in you home. In verticals, the "studio", "grand", "concert" desginations are to make you believe that they are something that they are not.

    NO vertical piano is a "grand". The first distinction is the action. A grand has a relatively simple action which utilizes gravity. A vertical piano requires more mechanics and utlimately feel different and have difficulty in certain areas (particularly repetition). Vertical pianos also eminate their sound differently. A grand has space below and above the soundboard (the upper part being easily opened and closed.) A vertical is designed to fit against a wall. There is more wood (and not able to be opened as easily) between the front of the sound board and the performer. This can actually cause problems in situations (like a choir accompanist) where the piano is not against a wall. The difference in volume from the performer's side and the back side is substantial.

    The ideal is a grand -- a horizontal piano with a modern grand action. That is not to say that a quality vertical piano, which cost half the price and take a fraction of the front to back space, can be a better option over a crappy grand.
    For some basic comparisons, a "petite grand" and the like have a sound board and bass string length similar to a 37" spinet! Rarely (though there have been instances) are these worth the money -- they are decor, if you are serious and space is really an issue, get a good vertical. A 42" console is roughly equivalent in sound board and bass string length to a 5'1" "baby grand". Tonally, a 52" is heading toward the 5'7" - 6' grands -- they have sound boards and bass strings similar to these instruments.

    In the end it is about the quality of the instrument (which name has a substantial bearing, but do your home work -- some early 20th c. pianos, like Knabe or Chickering, are different from mid to late 20th c. "stencil" versions), and tone quality. Yes, size matters, but from 5'7" on, the space is an important issue. A too big piano can be just as unsatisfying as a not good instrument -- a 9' grand in a space that would require no more than a 6' can in itself be problematic.

    I will quit rambling now.

    Scott
     
  8. musical-md

    musical-md Active Member

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    Scott, that was very good rambling :) , but no one said that a "vertical grand" actually was a grand. It is a term used to describe a vertical piano that because of its large size has so much speaking-length of the bass strings and area of soundboard that they really have a very impressive sound, even better than many economy grands. Of course, there is no comparision between the actions, unless of course we're comparing a top grade vertical "grand" with a cheap grand piano. An excellent piano is an excellent piano, and I would rather have a Steinway or Bosendorfer vertical grand, than an economy grade grand piano any day. I agree that spinets (all) are evil! :evil: That's my 2 cents.
     
  9. RSPIll

    RSPIll New Member

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    When I sold pianos years ago, I always had to chuckle when I couldn't get the potential buyer to go for a console (c. 42") over a spinet. The complaint was always that they did not have a lot of space. I always had to bite my lip to keep from asking "how low is your ceiling?"

    Scott
     
  10. RSPIll

    RSPIll New Member

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    My point was marketing for those not in the know. "Grand" is attached to "vertical" to make people think, at least subconsciously, that their piano is more special than a plain old upright. The original question refered to a "concert upright". How many uprights have you seen in a true "classical" piano recital or concert? It is marketing. People not knowledgeable about pianos are more likely to buy my 52" piano that is an "Upright Grand" or a "Concert Upright" than the other dealer's, possibly much better piano, that is just an "upright". The former sounds more elegant and people are snobs. (But there is hell to be paid when they find that the emperor is wearing no clothes.) :oops:

    Scott :D :) :shock: :eek: :twisted: :roll:
     
  11. musical-md

    musical-md Active Member

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    :lol: :lol: :lol:
    Those dropped actions are an afront to all piano players! Pulling is never as good as pushing.
     
  12. digitalpianofan7

    digitalpianofan7 New Member

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    oooo! what brand / model / type is that!?
     

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