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Chromatic scale question

Discussion in 'Composing' started by Horowitzian, Jan 11, 2010.

  1. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    I'm working on a short chromatic fantasy for piano (purely for enjoyment), and I'm having a brain fart. :oops:

    Is it preferable to always write an ascending chromatic scale with sharps and it's corresponding descending scale with flats?

    I hope that makes sense.
     
  2. RSPIll

    RSPIll New Member

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    Except for "always" (which is possibly too binding), Yes, otherwise you end up with bunches of natural signs to cancel from Sharp to natural descending or flat to natural ascending adding twice as many accidentals.

    Scott
     
  3. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    Thanks, Scott. That makes sense. I decided I had better get that cleared up before I wrote too much. :lol:
     
  4. RSPIll

    RSPIll New Member

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    One thing to consider when writing music down is how it will look to the person reading it. The idea is so that it is digestible in "words" and "sentences" rather than individual notes. A chormatic scale written "by the rule" is fairly easily discernible in one chunk -- all you need to know is the beginning and ending point, you don't have to read every note.

    If it were written in a non-standard way, it looks at first sight to be something other than a chromatic scale -- maybe a diminished or some other un-usual scale.

    The same idea follow in chord progressions, when you have options, you try to choose the most readable. There are instances that in very altered chords, the correct spelling (using 3rds as we were taught) may conflict with the movement of two or more different melodic lines, thus the melodic movement would often have precedence over the "correct spelling".

    It is rarely a problem in diatonic music, but the more chromatic the music is, the more you need to consider how it looks as opposed to just following a set of rules.

    I hope that made sense.

    Scott
     
  5. Horowitzian

    Horowitzian New Member

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    It does! I'm trying to avoid making textures too thick here, which should help. Function following form I guess. :D
     

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