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Chopin Waltz E flat major, Op. 18

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by harald, Jul 2, 2007.

  1. harald

    harald Member Piano Society Artist

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  2. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    I think you play with a lot of grace. Your use of rubato on this piece is a little more than what I prefer, and I could have used a bit more ff in the marked places. Your tempo was good, though, and I didn't hear a single wrong note, except that I've never heard it this way before at the 31st bar from the end. I think you dropped the d to a d-flat and played a c-natural on top. Was there also a d-flat on the bar before that? You must have this in your edition because it's very obviously different than when it happens on the 35th bar from end.
    So...I looked up your piano from your other thread, but I don't really understand it. Do you have a digital keyboard? The pictures show a huge grand, and also boxes of something. Do you play on a digital huge grand or do you play a box? :) (you don't know me, so I'll warn you that I have a weird sense of humor)
     
  3. robert

    robert Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    This was really different than I am used to hear. Rather excessive rubatos if you ask me but that is a matter of taste. I would also liked a bit higher tempo (even though I know it is a waltz) and agree to Monica's wish for more powerful dynamics when wherever you get the chance.

    But overall, a very good interpretation and we miss this famous waltz on the site (as we do with most waltzes).
     
  4. robert

    robert Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    You are up on the site as well as this recording.
     
  5. harald

    harald Member Piano Society Artist

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    Oh, but sometimes making a recording is hard: When it is going too bad I start from the beginning and overwrite the old recording. When this happens e. g. on the last page, I play only that page again and cut out the first try afterwards. I hope this is accepted by the board-rules.

    By the way: I also cut out the gaps at the page turns, because when I do a recording, there is nobody who could turn pages for me.

    Thanks for this detailed comment! I just looked it up in my edition. The c-natural is there, but the d-flat is my mistake!

    Humor is always good! You probably think I play "out-of-the-box" ;-)

    In 2003 I bought a digital piano (yamaha). In december 2005 I realized that the sound of software pianos like Ivory sound far better. The box is simply the package where the DVDs are in. You have to install the software on your PC and can play on your digital piano as a simple input device. The sound now comes out of your PC.
     
  6. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    I think that is only practical, and most of us probably do that (and certainly many professionals do it).

    That's something we all do too (at least the sorry sods like me who can't memorize). But many page turns can be executed smoothly with a bit of planning ahead, and/or the hands helping each other. Sometimes though it's just not possible, and then often the post-editing will be a problem too.


    Yes, some funny notes there, I heard them too.
    I did not like your see-sawing rubato in the repeated-note sections. And your extremely sedated start of the code is a bit of an anticlimax - I think the piece should end in a frothy whirlwind. Apart from that, well executed. There could be a bit more brilliance, as per the name of the piece, and dynamic contrast.

    Hmmmm, one step "up" from a conventional digital piano. I wonder what will be next.... There's nothing wrong with it per se, but this is getting a bit too artificial for me - like motor racing on your computer using a custom electronic steering device.
     
  7. harald

    harald Member Piano Society Artist

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    Interesting and constructive critics! I haven't thought about that anticlimax before.

    In addition to that I have to say that I redirect the sound output from the PC back to the digi piano. So when playing there's no difference to its native output.
    The basic discussion about the artificial play: I think that a real piano is always the best. But the digital world has its advantages. Making recordings is much easier, playing in the evening is possible with headphones without disturbing your neighbors. And with a good keyboard the feeling of the keystrokes is also very good. You do not need any tuning. You could rather adjust the tuning in order to play together with other instruments.
    Compared to an old and detuned piano I think that a good digital one is the better choice. Last but not least it is a matter of money.
     
  8. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    So, what gets into the mp3 is the sound generated by the PC software, and what your ears hear is the sound generated by the PC but rendered by the piano ? Sounds like a complicated setup....


    Sure we are aware of all the advantages of digitali recording. I sometimes long to be free of mechanical and tuning problems. In the end though, I'd not want to give up the sound and feel of a real instrument, even though it may be imperfect. Also, I think one can do far more subtle things on a real instrument regarding touch and pedaling.
     
  9. harald

    harald Member Piano Society Artist

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    Not rendered by the piano but only output by its loudspeakers. Yes, what my ears hear and what gets into the mp3 is the same.


    Yes that's true. In 2003 I had the possibility to practise on a real steinway in a big room. That was a dream!

    A controversion issue is often the question whether churches should acquire digital organs.
     
  10. MindenBlues

    MindenBlues New Member Piano Society Artist

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    That is controversial? :shock:

    Can't imagine a serious organ player or serious listener who prefers to play or listen to an electronic church organ.
    What I am happy that in our region there is NO church with a digital organ. For the main church in Minden, people were willing to spent and collect 500.000 Euro for a new pipe organ, artists played for free, many private donations. Never there was the discussion to get a much cheaper digital organ instead!
    There seems to be a common understanding that a real living acoustic instrument is so much more worthful as any dead digital simulation, even if it costs much more money, and even if it detunes with time and is not ideal, but that all attributes to be something living instead cold and steril.
     
  11. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Well it seems to be so here. I was told that many churches switch to digital organs because they do not have the resources to acquire or maintain the Real Thing. The difference in cost can easily be a factor 100, so in these dire times, with church attendance and funds dwindling, it is unavoidable. Also, because of the ongoing modernization of the liturgical repertoire, many churches and choirs prefer a piano - even if there is an organ at hand. Truly, these are worrying trends, and it does not seem such a good time to want to be an organist....

    But this is a bit OT really !
     
  12. MindenBlues

    MindenBlues New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Come to Germany, if they replace your church organ by a digital simulation thing. :lol:

    Many famous old german baroque organs endured 5 centuries and many wars, they will still exist in some more centuries when all digital keyboards from today don't work anymore, I am sure.
     
  13. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Luckily, that is not the plan. It will remain as it is in the new church, with perhaps even a few minor improvements. I may have to miss it for a year though, and that will be a problem...

    Yes they will exist (as it will be here, too) but whether they will be in any condition is another matter. That will all be down to the money. There is one sad case here where a formerly splendid organ in one of the country's largest churches (Grote Kerk, Dordrecht) is all but falling apart, and there is not nearly enough money to restore it.

    This topic has gone totally OT now... but it is all harald's fault. Teach him to start us off about organs :lol:
     
  14. robert

    robert Active Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    I was very surprised to read this as I have never been into a church (and I have been into many) with a digital organ. I think that is very rare over here in Sweden at least and I do not even know what such an organ would look like. Does a digital organ have 2-3 manuals and pedals?
     

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