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Chopin Prelude op 28 no 24- help

Discussion in 'Repertoire' started by Chopaninoff, Jul 22, 2010.

  1. Chopaninoff

    Chopaninoff New Member

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    The right hand runs, and the left hand 16th/8th notes confuse me. For example in bar 14...Bar 17...bar 18...bar 32...bar 35...bar 36...and bar 65.
    In theory there is no proper way or specific way to play it. but what would be most accurate in fitting in the right and left hand?
     
  2. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    Vosgerichian
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    George
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    Wow! This brings back memories from high school! I remember sitting down with my teacher, and working out these very passages. Here they are after 22 years...

    The R.H. notes are grouped with the left hand. This only makes sense when you're practicing slowly. Practice the runs ff at first, without the crescendos, with equal and firm intensity, and curved fingers. Don't worry that some groups are 3 and some are 4 within a passage, because when you play them in tempo, it all gels together nicely. The only landmark you have to remember when playing the passages in tempo are which note in the R.H. lands with the downbeat of the L.H. That way you can "pace" yourself so that one hand doesn't run off without the other. Let me know if you have any questions. This is one of my favorite Preludes so you better learn it very well! :p I've given you a start. Good Luck!
     
  3. Chopaninoff

    Chopaninoff New Member

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    Thank you very much for your time!I will get back to you in a few days/weeks on how my progress is. I also have been playing piano for over 20 years, but my hands never reached this prelude. perhaps I will record when learned. Thank you again very much!
     
  4. 88man

    88man Member Piano Society Artist

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    You're welcome! I forgot to mention a helpful point so you won't tire out the left hand. I probably should show a video of this, but I'll try to explain it in words...

    When playing each broken in the L.H., e.g. D A F D A', come down on the 5th fifth finger then pivot on the 3rd or 2nd finger (depending on the chord) then lift up your hand on the last eighth note without losing your 3rd/2nd finger from the pivot position, then come down again on the beat as to create an intentional and broad circular path with your wrist from the beginning to end for each chord cluster. This allows a much needed rest cycle for the hand after each broken chord, and the pivot finger also helps you to stabilize your position with a consistent point of reference so that you won't land on wrong notes. That pivot finger is like the tip of a spinning top, it should precess around the positional span of each broken chord. It's a very effective technique and you'll find yourself that the circular motion in the L.H will decrease the tension in your hand because you have enough to worry about in the R.H. Don't adopt a rigid stance in the L.H, or else you'll run out of gas.
     

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