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Chopin: Polonaise op.26/1 and Polonaise-Fantaisie op.61

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by Anonymous, Apr 25, 2007.

  1. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    op.26/1

    Here I operate a cut, and I do not repeat the B episode (from bar 21) and the 4th time of the theme.
    I find that in this way the formal and expressive quality is preserved, without one repeat (I hate repeats, "ritornelli", and tend to avoid them ).
    In the scale of bar 10 and similar one can see (as suggest Cortot, who purpose some cuts in Polonaises) " the flash of swords suddenly drawn". There is a "dark, nocturnal and tempestuous Polonaise, full of conspiracy and sedition" (Nieck).

    op.61

    After Schumann, another moment of "excess of sense": the final peroration (bars from 254, but also from 242), where the strength, the violence of the required ( better: desired, conceived) sound exceed the instrument's possibilities.
    This is rare in Chopin (Charles Rosen speak about this aspect in two passages: the Study op.25/12 and here), but it is not a defect (has his music some defects?).
    Few words about my recording. In my idea, the dimension of the "Phantaisie"; is more weighted than which of "Polonaise".
    The Polonaise being evoked in the free, dreaming journey of the Phantaisie. The only "real" Polonaise is at the end, a late and desperate invocation.
    Bars 180-181. Like bells. I heard this ornamental line played so pealing in a Pletnev (great pianist) recital, and I adored immediately this choice (nothing against the score : no dynamic indication there, only a "lento"). Here are the bells as described by the poet Aleksandr Blok: the sky spread its strength to the earth.

    All best,
    Sandro

    Chopin - Polonaise no.1, Op.26
    Chopin - Polonaise-Fanatsia, Op.61
     
  2. MindenBlues

    MindenBlues New Member Piano Society Artist

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    That's very good playing of those demanding pieces! Very expressive with lots of dynamics and freedom regarding rhythm. Whether too much freedom, is personally choice. I could imagine a more dashing rhythm on appropriate places, but that's your style and I like and respect it that way too.

    I would prefer to play all repetitions like written in the score and without shortcuts because I don't think that Chopin wrote the repetition marks by accident, instead with intention. That Cortot took much liberty with such things, also with correct notes can be the zeitgeist of the early 20th century. Maybe he would have another opinion in our days, who knows.

    Nevertheless, great recording, it was a pleasure to listen to.
     
  3. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    I listened to the P-F. Very accomplished as usual, and hardly a note wrong. There are only two reading mistakes that caught my ear as they affect the harmony:

    Bar 25 and 44 - Last LH note should be d flat, not d natural
    Bar 93 - LH low note should be d, not b flat

    I have great respect for your technical abilty and polish. Actually I was working on this same piece for recording a while ago, but sort of left it when Setrak submitted his recording. And now we have 2 very good ones, and it could only get worse :lol:

    I am less enthousiastic about your interpretation. As often with your recordings, I find too many distracting and idiosyncratic things in almost every bar to really enjoy it. I guess this is either one's style and taste, or it isn't. Some things I thought were rather strange are:

    The agitato starting in bar 107 is rushed to the point of being ugly.
    In bar 254 and from there, the rhythm is strangely lopsided, almost like a dotted rhythm.
    Bar 180/181: why on earth do you play these connections notes forte ???
    In bar 206 you seem to disregard the sforzando.
    In bar 245 and similar bars you do not, or not properly, play the dotted LH rhythm.

    The coda is properly grandiose, though with a bit more width and breath, and attention for the long line, it could be even better. In general, all the interpretational quirks make your interpretation sound a bit fragmented. But I know you do all this for a reason, so I'll shut up about it :D
    Great job all the same, no mistake about it.
     
  4. robert

    robert New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Enough said. Well done!

    The recordings are up on the site.
     
  5. Anonymous

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    >Bar 25 and 44 - Last LH note should be d flat, not d natural
    Bar 93 - LH low note should be d, not b flat

    :oops:
    The Chopin's Mazurka (I'll send you the re-recorded), the Robert's Polska: there is ever
    a D missing or in a wrong place....

    > Actually I was working on this same piece for recording a while ago, but sort of left it when Setrak submitted his recording....

    Also I made this consideration. I've sent it only because it was an already done recording.

    >
    And now we have 2 very good ones, and it could only get worse :lol:

    :) Better than Setrak I think is really difficult. And Gardel's one is IMHO very interesting.

    > The agitato starting in bar 107 is rushed to the point of being ugly.

    Yes, it is a real (or too much real) agitato.

    > In bar 254 and from there, the rhythm is strangely lopsided, almost like a dotted rhythm.

    I deliberately tend to a division 35-35-30 of the three demiquavers.

    > Bar 180/181: why on earth do you play these connections notes forte ???

    :) See in my comment of the piece. The bells, Pletnev, Aleksandr Blok....

    >In bar 206 you seem to disregard the sforzando.

    It's only more weighted than susequent note in the melody. The climax has passed with the end of
    the thrills

    > In bar 245 and similar bars you do not, or not properly, play the dotted LH rhythm.

    here (and only here) I do not understand. Which dotted rythm?

    > In general, all the interpretational quirks make your interpretation sound a bit fragmented.

    This is a fact. In a certain measure, I too think so. But I hope to find some particular
    expressive details phrase-by-phrase, and let the listener to re-built the complexive structure.

    Thank you for all your considerations, and All best,

    Sandro
     
  6. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    I did not realize he had one up as well. I thought we did not have this work yet when I started working on it.

    Ouch !

    See image. In a number of places you play equal eights in the LH.
     

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