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Chopin Nocturne E minor (Op. Post)

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by RichNocturne, Feb 14, 2007.

  1. RichNocturne

    RichNocturne Member Piano Society Artist

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    This is my recording of Chopin's Nocturne in E minor, Op. Post. Recorded once again, at Rhode Island College on a Kawai (damn 'secret stash of Steinway)...there's a few errors in the playing, but time didn't allow me to try and perfect the recording...as always, criticisms are more than welcome, and appreciated greatly (sorry for the plethora of nocturnes, but they're what I live for).

    Chopin Nocturne E minor (Op. Post)
     
  2. schmonz

    schmonz Amitai Schlair Piano Society Artist

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    It's clear to the ear that you love what you're playing, and it sounds lovely. I don't know the Nocturnes inside and out (though I've been known to listen over and over to Barenboim's) but it sounds like the cross-rhythms give you a little trouble. Maybe work on those a bit?
     
  3. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    I think I have heard twenty different versions of this piece, so there is nothing much to say about notes and rhythms.

    You played this well. Very passionate, good dynamics, and your strong trills worked here too. Good job!

    Nothing wrong with that!
     
  4. John Robson

    John Robson New Member Piano Society Artist

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    E min. nocturne

    Bravo! It's obvious that you love this piece very much as I do also. You play it very sensitively. Your dynamics and rubato were very good. Overall, it was a well-done performance. I enjoyed it immensely.
     
  5. robert

    robert New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Lovely! You play with passion and feel and the only thing I would recommend is a bit more power in the Climax. But not a key wrong throughout. Bravo!
     
  6. s_winitsky

    s_winitsky Member

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    I thought it was lovely. My piano teacher is getting me to play this next and so I just started to learn it.

    Any recommendations on learning the rythm of the left hand vs. the right hand at 2:15? Did you practise those runs hands seperate or did you do lots of hands together work on those runs? They are a bit like the runs in CHopin's fantasy impromptu.

    Also, I might be missing something obvious, but I don't quite understand the harmony changes of this piece (although it sounds beautiful.) Do you guys know what chord progression is happening? I don't know if I should be asking this, but it usually helps me memorize music :) I figure one of you worked this out?
     
  7. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    I can only chime in with previous posters. Very well done ! I have put it up the site.
     
  8. RichNocturne

    RichNocturne Member Piano Society Artist

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    With me, the best way of learning the polyrhythms in Chopin is, yes, seperate hands first, and then so incredibly slow together that you go mad. I also don't even think about using a metrenome until I can at least play it at a decent tempo without it.

    And as to the harmonies, which part do you mean of the harmony changes? A normal harmonic analysis will help you understand the piece better, but if there's any parts, specifically, that are confusing, let me know, and I could post 'em up.
    -Rich
     
  9. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    I have always found it easiest to start them incredibly fast, and away from the piano. For example you need to learn 3-to-5, you let one hand the fingers of one hand drum out 3 for a while, very fast, then add the RH drumming out the 5 simultaneously, keeping a strong accent on the first note. I find that this comes naturally at a high speed. Then gradually slow down and bingo. It may be a strange approach but it works for me.
     
  10. s_winitsky

    s_winitsky Member

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    I think the hardest part for me is the modulation from g major to b major starting at around bar 14. It is a tricky part for me to remember and to make the notes very clear in my head. I find part of the hard part is the very large interval changes in the left hand. Not sure if this is the correct place to post this but any help would be appreiciated.
     
  11. RichNocturne

    RichNocturne Member Piano Society Artist

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    I think the best way to remember something is doing something verrrrry slowly, and gradually repeating it faster and faster. Knowing general harmonic analysis and chord progressions helps with me, as well...above the measures preceding and proceding your 'trouble measures', I write the chord above and its Roman Numeral/Function in whatever key I'm in (even if it's 2, acting as a pivot chord), and then take it from there...this usually helps, as I'm thinking of theory while I play. Also, this part, with the sudden change to G major is in need of color change...I'm not sure if I played it that way...I can't remember, but definately show the major if you can.[/quote]
     

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