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Beethoven,Sonata No.32 Op. 111

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by Anonymous, Apr 27, 2007.

  1. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    very good! i LOVE this sonata, you played it very well.

    isnt the first movement maestoso-allegro con brio ed appasionato?
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    For sure first movement is maestoso-allegro con brio ed appasionato, my recording engineer fault is and I didn't look at it, also he upload it because I have very slow internet speed, anyway there is score first movement is written Allegro molto.
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

  5. robert

    robert New Member Piano Society Artist

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    I feel that your playing fits very well with Beethoven and this was another example of a world class recording.

    The Piano Sonata No. 32 in C minor, Opus 111, is the last of Ludwig van Beethoven's piano sonatas. The work was written in 1821–1822. Like other "late period" sonatas, it contains fugal elements and is technically very demanding.

    The first movement, like many other works by Beethoven in C minor, is stormy and impassioned. It abounds in diminished seventh chords, as in for instance the first full bar of its opening introduction.

    The final movement, in C major, is a set of variations on a 16-bar theme, with a brief modulating interlude and final coda. The third variation is remarkably jazzy and often referred to as the "boogie-woogie variation", and the last two are famous for introducing small notes which constantly divide the bar in 36 resp. 27 parts, which is very uncommon. Beethoven eventually introduces a trill which gives the impression of a further step, though this extremely technically difficult without slowing down to half-tempo.

    The recording is up on the site.
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Thank you Robert for adding on site, you are very talented in analyzing any music, your brain is a like musical library.

    Good luck for future updating Piano Society
    Setrak Setrakian
     
  7. techneut

    techneut Active Member Piano Society Artist

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    A brain called Wikipedia :p
     
  8. robert

    robert New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Yes that was definitely a quote. I usually put "" around the text when I do that but forgot it this time. But, I could not have said it better so why reinvent things?

    The reason I add some text is for educational purpose as I sometimes suspect that some people pay little attention to the composer, the time he lived in, the form and the influences of the work. It is my view that one cannot seriously interpret a composer's music without first reading at least one biographical book. Not everything is in the score and what's in between the lines is of equal importance as the score itself.
     

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