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Beethoven -- Sonata in G Major, Op. 14, No. 2

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by jlr43, Jun 4, 2010.

  1. jlr43

    jlr43 Member Piano Society Artist

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  2. pianolady

    pianolady Monica Hart, Administrator Staff Member Piano Society Artist

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    This is up, Joe.
     
  3. Jan

    Jan Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hi Joe!

    I just listened to your recording of op. 14/2, and I must say, I'm a bit disappointed. I know you're usually playing on a very high level, but this time it seems to me you were somehow careless.
    As you asked for comments, I honestly want to say what I thought listening to this recording.
    There are many staccato-quavers, especially in the second and third movement, which you play too long and not staccato at all (especially the ending of the second movement - a fermata on the last note is simply n o t indicated, and doesn't fit either). In the first movement, there are a some bars where you loose your tempo (e.g. 44 and 46) and some passages would require some additional practice (e.g. 107-114: left and right hand not together). The second movement has some crescendis which are not indicated, these rather disturb the indicated dynamics (e.g. bar 13-14). In the third movement you left out whole passages (bars 51-64 and 147-159) - maybe this was not careless and you have a different edition, but I found some more bars to play in that movement. Then there are many rests which you don't play, instead your quavers have hangovers.
    I'm not saying you're playing bad: There are very few wrong notes (3rd movement, b. 73-76 l.h. and 105-107 were the only things I noticed), and your overall playing is very confident. I believe you have many interesting ideas for the interpretation of this sonata, but unfortunately there are too many things which distract me as a listener from noticing these ideas.
    I know it's sometimes hard to listen to other peoples interpretations, and maybe I stick to too many of my habbits with this opus. But I hope in reviewing your recording (maybe with a Urtext-Edition) you'll find that there are still some things to work on.
    Thanks for sharing! With best wishes

    Jan
     
  4. jlr43

    jlr43 Member Piano Society Artist

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    Hello Jan,

    Thanks very much for the comments.

    Oh well. As they say, you win some, you lose some.

    I understand what you're saying here and how Beethoven marks it. However, I chose to do it differently. A staccato gesture for me loses the grandness of this movement. I did experiment with this and didn't like it. (Incidentally, I did also listen to your performance and this is one of the things I didn't like. A short staccato sounds dinky and prissy to me here.) Same thing with the fermata. Though many nowadays will disagree with me, I'm with the old school in that I don't think a performer needs to treat the score as a bible that can't be deviated from.

    In 44 and 46, I deliberately do a ritard for dramatic purposes. I agree with you about 107-114 needing more work; with that leap it's difficult to make it all sound even.

    Again, in the final performance, I don't think one needs to be constrained by the score. Those crescendi I do deliberately. A performer's individual interpretation is what makes playing the piano interesting. Incidentally, when I listen to others' playing I never listen with score; my attitude is that someone should convince me, whatever way they play it.

    Oops, you're right. Thanks for pointing this out. I will correct this.


    Thanks again for the comments.
     

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