Thank you to those who donated to Piano Society in 2017.

Bartok - Suite Op. 14

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by felipesarro, Oct 18, 2009.

  1. luissarro

    luissarro New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Messages:
    161
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Brazil
    Home Page:
    thanks, Peter, for making it clear.

    very interesting stuff. I had previously understood it, but I wasn't clear in my text (I said that my decision of playing every moment as "attaca" to the next was previous to listening to the recording). thanks for making it clear.

    regarding tempo... as far as I remember, Bartok was playing it SLOWER than his own duration indications on the score. maybe he made more than one recording? I remember I found his interpretation quite measured and not so hurried at all. anyway... I don't remember exactly...
     
  2. Peter Adamson

    Peter Adamson New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Adamson
    First Name:
    Peter
    <phew> that's a relief! -- I thought I was going to have to let you hear both sides of my 1929 Bartok 78rpm disc to demonstrate exactly what I meant... :D

    Good luck with your own performances!

    Peter
     
  3. hreichgott

    hreichgott New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    283
    Likes Received:
    1
    Fantastic job Felipe.

    Here and there, you could do some things to improve the "groove" as drummers say, especially in the sections with oompah and other dance-like rhythms. Maybe emphasize strong beats in both hands more strongly, and choose more gradual slowings and speedings of tempo instead of sudden hesitations or suddenly cutting beats short.

    I would have gone for a more prominent, cantabile and less aggressive melody in the Sostenuto -- it's dissonant, yes, but in context of what came before it could really be a lovely slow movement.

    The best parts are the ones with high drama, for example
    Staccato runs leading up to 2:10 and the dramatic section immediately following
    Spooky ostinato around 3:50 and 5:05
    Crazy church bells around 4:50
    Dash off cliff around 5:45 (I just thought the timing of this was excellent, a tiny slowdown but not so much that it dispelled the energy)
    The places where the Sostenuto movement gets more angsty, like around 8:04
    Really well controlled long gradual diminuendo at the end.

    Oddly, these are also some of the most difficult parts to play. Maybe there are things you could do in practice to work imaginatively on "easy" sections?
     

Share This Page