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Bach Prelude & Fugue in C major BWV 846

Discussion in 'Submission Room' started by Vladimir Oppenheim, Dec 12, 2021.

  1. Vladimir Oppenheim

    Vladimir Oppenheim Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Hello,
    I would love to share my recording of Prelude & Fugue in C major BWV 846 by Bach.

    Thanks for listening
    Vladimir
     

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    Last edited: Jan 11, 2022
  2. johngrant

    johngrant New Member Trusted Member

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    My very much belated response! I notice you use that "extra" measure, attributed to Czerny, which I've always liked (although my piano teacher frowned on it).

    Everyone likes to think this prelude is "easy." Certainly it is easy to sight read, but I'd argue that it's actually among the most difficult of the 48. Why? Because (depending on the way your piano is regulated) it's very difficult to play it perfectly evenly and (as Richter famously achieves in the most reverberant of his many recordings of the WTK) SOFTLY, as well, much less softly WITH a very subtle emphasis on the first beat of every bar. (AT least I like it played that way. Not everyone does.) Also difficult is the question: how much pedal, if any, and when to begin to "turn the corner," as it were, to diminish the intensity that this piece seems naturally to build and to require as the climax approaches?

    This rendering I like because it addresses these issues (inter alia), and the piano recording comes off quite nicely. On that note, I'm a fan of self-tuning and, if you can manage the work, self-regulating and voicing. An iphone-only app called "Piatune" is available now which is demonstrably superior to all the more expensive piano-tuning apps out there, and which follows the beat-measuring approach to tuning that all trained tuners employ. Grands are easier to tune than uprights; so with a torque tuning hammer (shaped like a large T-wrench, much like what you use on your vehicles wheel nuts) you can do AT LEAST as well as a professional tuner, and without bending the tuning pins!

    At any rate, this instrument is fairly well in tune and, again, quite well-recorded--seems to me, at least.
     
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  3. Vladimir Oppenheim

    Vladimir Oppenheim Member Piano Society Artist Trusted Member

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    Thank you for the comments and insight into the piece! Often, when listening to or playing Bach's music, I enter a state of equanimity, so to speak. Balance, sense of proportions, and logic is very strong. I am not saying that the music lacks emotions, of course not, but the very language and, perhaps Bach's personality bring to mind the beautiful picture of marble architecture that inspires and bewilders us at the same time.
    Yes, definitely, creating a culmination here is not an easy task, as the material is evolving around similar chords, while harmony is a moving force.
    I never tried self-tuning, but the idea seems clever!
     

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