DONATION STATUS
Needed before 2016-12-31
$ 2,500
So far donated
$ 750

arpeggios

Discussion in 'Technique' started by jesus_loves_u, Jun 12, 2006.

  1. jesus_loves_u

    jesus_loves_u New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    im a hobo =()
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    WLM:
    w1nd0ws_xp@hotmail.com
    LOCATION:
    Sydney, Australia
    How do you do em fast and clear???
     
  2. joeisapiano

    joeisapiano New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Piano Student
    Location:
    Cedarville University
    Last Name:
    Kingma
    First Name:
    Joseph
    YAHOO:
    joeisapiano
    LOCATION:
    Cedarville University
    practice them slowly and clearly. :p
     
  3. ben

    ben New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Kopp
    First Name:
    Benjamin
    When playing fast, do not even attempt to play legato, and do not turn the thumb under at all. Does this help? There are also many different ways to practise them.
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    is it necessary to use the pedal in order for fast arpeggios to be legato?
     
  5. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    the wrist and hand can not be locked down and must move as one
    yet independent parts... i once took a master class... and the teacher
    said... "think of your fingers as wearing different types of shoes...
    in this case you want nice light touch like ballet shoes... the fingers
    should barely touch the bottom of the key like a foot barely
    touching the floor, the leg bends as a shock absorber, so too
    does the wrist..."

    He was teaching me a Chopin waltz at the time however the same
    rings true with arpeggios... and active finger tips always...
     
  6. jesus_loves_u

    jesus_loves_u New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    im a hobo =()
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    WLM:
    w1nd0ws_xp@hotmail.com
    LOCATION:
    Sydney, Australia
    thats what i do but it doesn't sound very clear =-[
     
  7. PJF

    PJF New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Fournet
    First Name:
    Pierre
    No. Just the opposite, in fact. When practicing arpeggios, do so without the pedal, to make sure the legato is not broken. Good wrist flexibility will facilitate legato arpeggs. A common error is to try to span the intervals with the fingers, an impossible task. The wrist must lead the hand into position, before the note is played. Reaching with the fingers is never correct.
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Practice.

    Slowly.

    :D
     
  9. PJF

    PJF New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Fournet
    First Name:
    Pierre
    Yes, that's right, but don't forget to also practice quickly! Slowly and quickly. The difference in practice speeds from day to day will break even the most stubborn plateau. Practice differently.

    Pete
     
  10. romanza

    romanza New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    none
    Location:
    Texas
    LOCATION:
    Texas
    oh yes, the much loved arpeggios... i suggest taking a thirty minute or even fifteen minute interval of time to practice ONE apeggio only and starting with triplets on 60bpm and play that ONE arpeggio scale OVER and OVEr and OVer(i kno it will sound babyish or stupid, but u'll be suprised) then use ur own opinion to determine when u feel it is perfect, perfection and clarity is key, thats what u want rite? then once u decide u have mastered 60bmp then increase tempo to 72bmp then 80bmp then 92 then 100 etc... It does wonders for me, hope it helps u. keep a consistent, continuous motion, try not to break sound and scale!!! :wink:
     
  11. johnmar78

    johnmar78 New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Messages:
    647
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Food chemist / pianist
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Home Page:
    Last Name:
    Mar
    First Name:
    John
    WEBSITE:
    http://www.geocities.com/johnmarshome/
    LOCATION:
    Sydney, Australia
    Good work. You must be the arpegio king...... :lol: ...You have the patience.
     
  12. PJF

    PJF New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Fournet
    First Name:
    Pierre
    Continuity.

    Pete
     
  13. Svane

    Svane New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    WLM:
    Bender-the-robot@hotmail.com
    Plural of arpeggio is arpeggi, not arpeggios.
    I think..
     
  14. hunwoo

    hunwoo New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Zealand
    WLM:
    hunwoo91@hotmail.com
    LOCATION:
    New Zealand
    Learn Chopin Etude no.1 op.10
     
  15. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Advice in the books by Josef Lhévinne and Abby Whiteside, when put together, helped me the most. IMO, try not to purposely reach with the tips of your fingers, that makes playing bumpy and forte almost impossible. Fingers alone are not meant for such acrobatics. Instead I make my chord formation by spreading the palm muscles, and I found that this technique allows for a supple wrist. The fingers simply become a bony structure, which you will play against. Upon Whiteside's advice, I use mostly the upper-arm (and some forearm in co-operation with upper) to apply the power and the distance. With your chord formation in the palm, your wrist should be flexible enough to fling your arm to the next position, like cracking a whip. Playing them this way, I do not turn my thumb under unnaturally, but I find that nature does it slightly for me. I could say more, but I recommend checking out the authors I mentioned.
     
  16. PJF

    PJF New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Fournet
    First Name:
    Pierre
    I agree Abby Whiteside's take on arps is most helpful!!!

    Pete
     
  17. Key88

    Key88 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Ireland
    LOCATION:
    Ireland
    I think a good way to prepare for arpeggios (which are more difficult than scales) is to play 4 note broken chords slowly and clearly, using the metronome at a slox tempo, say crotchet (quarter note) = 40 (or even slower). Play with precise downward motion of each finger. Then when you feel comfortable with the tempo and can play in time, increase the metronome speed a few notches. Over a period you will become more fluent. My experience is that this is beneficial with playing arpeggios. By the way don't strain your thumb crossing it under the fingers when playing arpeggios is an effort to get a perfect legato. With many hand sizes it's just not possible.
     
  18. diminished2nd

    diminished2nd New Member Piano Society Artist

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2007
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    0
    Last Name:
    Kendrick
    First Name:
    Austin
    AOL:
    oatmealandy
    I agree with romanza's post on this one... I didn't read past that post, so I don't know what was said after it.

    Except, instead of playing them as triplets, play them as 16ths. This helps to make them not "lumpy" and makes them a lot more smooth.

    Also, just a minor difference, but instead of bumping up 8 or 12 bpm each time, I only do 4 (I practice everything this way... start out at half tempo or slower, and then once it's perfect at that tempo, bump up the metronome 4 bpm. I guess the 4 bpm thing only works if you have a digital metronome come to think of it... if you don't have one though, you should go out and get one anyway :lol: )
     

Share This Page