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analysing pieces

Discussion in 'General' started by rachmaninoff, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. rachmaninoff

    rachmaninoff New Member Piano Society Artist

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    hello,

    I was wondering if there are people around here who could tell me stuff about the things you have to say when you are analysing pieces.

    does someone know?

    gr
     
  2. juufa72

    juufa72 New Member Piano Society Artist

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    If there is a lot of black ink on one page i say: "in your dreams, Julius"


    Is that what you mean?
     
  3. rachmaninoff

    rachmaninoff New Member Piano Society Artist

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    no haha what do I have to tell in a analyse ?
     
  4. schmonz

    schmonz Amitai Schlair Piano Society Artist

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    Depends on the piece and the level of analysis. Who's the intended audience? But generally, it's good to start by noting the most prevalent keys, their relationships, and the piece's overall form. From there you can go deeper and analyze the harmonic progressions using e.g. Roman numerals representing chord functions, and this will help you spot key modulations and understand their role in the piece. If you really want to get to know some music, identify its themes and motives and find where they pop up later, how they may have been modified from the originals (in a different voice? melodically inverted? chromatically altered? retrograde?), etc.

    And now that I've said all that, don't take it too seriously. ;-) The point of analysis, IMO, is to find patterns, because artful music is almost always filled with such. The above are just a few of the kinds of patterns which can be found. Keep them in mind when you're analyzing, by all means, but don't be constrained by them. If you spot something interesting that doesn't have a handy entry in the musical dictionary, it's probably even more interesting than the patterns that do.
     
  5. Jennifer

    Jennifer New Member Piano Society Artist

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    Now this is my area! Hahahaha!

    Start general and then get more specific.

    If you are looking at a longer work, devide it into sections. What sections are similar and what are different. Also, take not of the key areas. These are the key factors to getting the form of a work.

    This also applies to short pieces, even the shortest of short. Look at the phrases. Which are similar and which are different. Short pieces are usually two or three part forms.

    Good luck!
     

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