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 Post subject: glissandos
PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2006 12:17 am 
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Well i think it is called Glissandos, i think its when you use fingers 1 and 5 to slide up the keys real fast or something like that, i find that impossible to do without hurting your fingers! How do you practice something so painful!

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2006 5:35 am 
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Do it with your nails! Don't use your fingers. Than it will work without pain.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2006 1:31 pm 
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Yeah, ask your teacher how to do it if you have one.
Anyway, always use the nail.

For right hand glissandos going up, use the nail of the middle finger.
For right hand glissandos going down, use the nail of the thumb.
For left hand glissandos going up, use the nail of the thumb.
For left hand glissandos going down, use the nail of the middle finger.

That's how I do it.

If you mean using 1 and 5 at the same time, it's gliding octaves, glissandos in octaves. That's hard.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 1:16 am 
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what do you do when you use fingers 1 and 5? my nails are too short

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:42 am 
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Watch Hamelin:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBygW-3f ... in%20Liszt

Somewhere near the cadenza he made you see him doing that. Watch carefully what exactly he does...

Don't know myself. Never tried glissandos with 1 and 5 at the same time.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2006 10:42 am 
i cant say anything about using one and five (try another fingering lol im unhelpful)..but sometimes you cant just use your nails...e.g. i had to play a piece that had a gliss from the top black note coming down...i did it quite comfortable by useing the side of my index finger (on the flesh bit)...yeh, sure it hurt a bit at first but practise is everything! no seriously! i developed a bit of a callouse (not sure if thats how u spell it) so that it didnt hurt! ...blisters or bleeding is bad, so at first when practising, dont go too many time yet!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2006 2:35 am 
for many years now I have been working on the glissando of Beethoven`s opus 53 in
the last movement (the thing is ...to make the C major scale with both 1 and 5)
I still don`t feel confident on my results Could some one give me some help on this particular piece ???:D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2006 3:51 am 
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Sometimes, if I've had too much caffeine, I play the descending octaves at the end of Chopin's "Black Key Etude" as a glissando. I can't do it on a concert grand, only on my little baby grand and only if my hands are sweaty; although I don't think that's good for the piano's action or my poor fingers. :lol:

Is there a piece that uses such octave glissandos?

Pete


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2006 9:16 pm 
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Location: Obamanation, unfortunately...
PJF wrote:
Is there a piece that uses such octave glissandos?

Pete



I think one of Liszt's hungarian rhapsodies has a few runs up and down the keys.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 7:51 pm 
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I don't know of any downward octave glissandos. These would be extremely hard to play with the RH so I doubt that Beethoven meant these runs as a glissando.

The only upward octave glissando I know is the one in Islamey. None in the Liszt rhapsodies, though plenty of single ones, up and down, in nr. 8, and also in both hands in contrary motion, bit of a novely there.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:22 pm 
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Location: Obamanation, unfortunately...
So it wasn't a Liszt Rhapsodie. Hmm I recall a piece here on the site (I think Steven Kopp was playing) and it was called "something Fireworks" but now I cant find it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 2:12 am 
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I tried an octave glissando on a Steinway-D. It's ridiculously difficult. At this point, Islamy would be a futile endeavor. Maybe I'll try that one in another life.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 5:12 am 
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Quote:
So it wasn't a Liszt Rhapsodie. Hmm I recall a piece here on the site (I think Steven Kopp was playing) and it was called "something Fireworks" but now I cant find it.

Would be Debussy's Feux d'artifice. No octave glissandos here, but one on black and white keys simultaneously, playes with both hands. You don't see these often either (Britten's Holiday Diary has some too).
The chord glissando in Ravel's Alborada del Gracioso are very hard as well.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 5:56 am 
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Chord glissando? Was Ravel crazy? :lol: I'd have to wear gloves so as not to blister my fingers. That "chromatic glissando" in Feux d'Artifice is my favorite moment in Debussy's music. It sounds totally foreign.

I wonder, can anyone think of something that hasn't been done on the piano? I know of fists, elbows or even whole arms being used to play huge chunks of keys in some contemporary music. Another weird thing is putting screws in between the piano wires to create ringing overtones. (That was done for the soundtrack of the movie "Grizzly Man".)

How about tuning a piano in quarter-tones? Twenty-four keys to an octave? That's something George Crumb would do! :lol:

Pete


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 7:17 am 
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Quote:
Chord glissando? Was Ravel crazy? :lol:

Well chords... they're only thirds, but even so, yes it is quite painful if the keys are not very light.

Quote:
I wonder, can anyone think of something that hasn't been done on the piano? I know of fists, elbows or even whole arms being used to play huge chunks of keys in some contemporary music. Another weird thing is putting screws in between the piano wires to create ringing overtones. (That was done for the soundtrack of the movie "Grizzly Man".)

What about the piece of cardboard prescribed for the Hawthorne movement of Ives' Concord Sonata ! Use to press about 30 keys at a time. sometimes black, sometimes white. A really weird effect.

Quote:
How about tuning a piano in quarter-tones? Twenty-four keys to an octave? That's something George Crumb would do! :lol:

Earlier this year I attended a demonstration on a microtone piano. It was really weird, the pianist running up and down the (normal) keyboard producing sound waves covering only 2 octaves. This guy (Dutch pianost Maarten van Veen) is really good in this kind of thing. Must take enormous concentration to play this sort of thing.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 8:45 am 
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How about a piano built in reverse, the high notes to the left and the bass to the right? Victor Borge would've enjoyed that! I wonder what the effect would be if the soundboard was made of something other than wood, like glass or quartz.

Cardboard! :lol: That cracks me up. Next thing, they'll be putting ping-pong balls and set mousetraps on the strings.

I'd never heard of a microtone piano, I can't wait to hear it!

PF


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 9:10 am 
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Well, I found a microtone piano video. Wow, its truly bizzare. I almost couldn't listen to the whole thing.
Since I have perfect pitch, it was distressing. It made me sea-sick but there is a part of me that wants to hear more.

PF


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 9:14 am 
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Quote:
How about a piano built in reverse, the high notes to the left and the bass to the right?

I seem to remember such a thing exists, was built for a pianist who had some problem using a normal one. Can't recall the details though.

Quote:
Cardboard! :lol: That cracks me up. Next thing, they'll be putting ping-pong balls and set mousetraps on the strings.

Nothing that avant-garde. Just some strip if material of a prescribed length that you can grab and use to press and hold down key clusters. Amazing, if you think that this Ives sonata goes back to 1915 or so .... The guy was really pretty unconventional.
No glissandi in there though (just in case we want to get back on topic :lol: )

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 1:05 am 
PJF wrote:
Since I have perfect pitch, it was distressing.



dang, i wish i had perfect pitch...it would make life easier :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 1:05 am 
[quote="PJF"]
Since I have perfect pitch, it was distressing.
[quote]


dang, i wish i had perfect pitch...it would make life easier :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 4:57 am 
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Perfect pitch is as much a curse; I wish I didn't have it. But we digress...

Does anyone know of the earliest keyboard piece with glissando? I can't imagine Bach doing such a thing, Mozart maybe. I imagine it would have been possible only after the forte-piano was invented.

I once read that upon rising from the piano, Chopin had the "sad habit" of running his finger up the keyboard as if to forcibly rip himself from it.

Pete


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 Post subject: Re: glissandos
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2007 5:30 pm 
jesus_loves_u wrote:
Well i think it is called Glissandos, ...


"glissandos" :?: That looks like a spanish word to me... Glissandi is the plural. :wink:
But do carry on... :roll:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2007 3:14 am 
Quote:
I don't know of any downward octave glissandos.


Brahms's Paganini Variations (Book I, Var. XIII).

Quote:
These would be extremely hard to play with the RH so I doubt that Beethoven meant these runs as a glissando.


Indeed Beethoven meant them as glissandi in the Waldstein Sonata (as well as in the First Concerto), at least, according to musicologists and historically informed pianists. A clue to that is Beethoven's original fingering, which indicates 1-5 on each octave, quite redundant if that weren't the case. As to the difficulty of octave glissandi on a modern piano, yes, they are troublesome, for sure more troublesome than on Beethoven's times fortepianos, whose key dip was shallower and action very light. Arrau himself could drop the Waldstein from his recital program, if the instrument wasn't properly regulated.


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 Post subject: Octave Glissandi
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2007 5:12 pm 
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Some pianists rub the tip of the 5th finger on the greasy part of the head or palm just before doing downward octave glissandi.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2007 8:13 am 
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oooooo

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2007 11:37 pm 
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Location: Gulfport, MS, USA
Quote:
Perfect pitch is as much a curse; I wish I didn't have it. But we digress...

I think I have it even though I cannot do it under pressure - I can abstain from music all day and then sing the first note of a song that I know well before it begins, perfectly in tune, but I sometimes can't name a pitch on the spot. I just know that the jukebox at my job has songs that are warped, that go in and out of tune rapidly, and it drives me absolutely batty because I can't convince anyone else that I work with that there's anything wrong with it! Argh!

I heard something for two pianos tuned a quarter tone apart in college, I think by Ives, and I remember actually liking it (much to my surprise).

(Digression can be fun.) :)

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