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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 3:24 pm 
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rachmaninoff wrote:
sviatoslav richter I would think


I personally don't think Richter has as good technique as Hoffmann, Rachmaninov, Hamelin, etc. He can play very well though.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 3:53 pm 
I would say Ian Pace probably.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 5:28 pm 
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isn't it so that rachmaninoff couldn't play that well like horowitz? I heard something about that he could play the pianoconcerto's like horowitz etz..

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 6:23 pm 
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rachmaninoff wrote:
isn't it so that rachmaninoff couldn't play that well like horowitz? I heard something about that he could play the pianoconcerto's like horowitz etz..


He maybe couldn't play his own concertos as well as Horowitz, but he has amazing technique, as good as Horowitz. When Rachmaninov heard Horowitz playing his 3rd (or 2nd?) concerto in the basement of the Steinway shop in New York, if I remembered well, after Horowitz played, and he played the orchestra part, he said something like "This is how my concerto should be played, but I didn't expect that I would every hear it like this." So he was quite positive about Horowitz :D.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 7:57 pm 
Hamelin separates himself from Horowitz, Brendel, Arrau, Rubinstein and even the modern populars like Yundi Li, Lang Lang, Kissin etc because he actually plays something DIFFERENT. This is the only guy who tackles Alkan, Medtner, Catoire, Henselt, Thalberg and Balakirev all in the same day, with tremendous skill and musical interpretation. I would never recommend passing judgement on Hamelin until you hear his Alkan "Symphony for Solo Piano" CD from the Hyperion label. THAT is an achievement of both technique and musical feeling.

To be fair, though... I absolutely hated his recording of Alkan's Concerto for Solo Piano; it was trash compared to Smith's and Gibbons, but it's hard to be picky about Alkan since no one wants to play his works.

Anyway, even if many disagreed about Hamelin's interpretation, touch, or even technique, you can't look down on a pianist who tries to revive previously unheard or unfamiliar music. We need more pianists like him.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 2:22 am 
I have the great privilege of going to a school that Hamelin is fond of for some reason. I study at Brandon University in Brandon, Canada, and he has been at our school numerous times over the years, once in each the last couple years (although I've only been in university for two of those years and two of those three were with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra which travels to Brandon for five concerts a year). Anyways, in my first year, fall of 2004, he came to our school with his wife, the singer Jody Karen (or Karol?) Applebaum (sp?) for a week-long residency. It was an amazing week. Hamelin played the complete Albeniz' Iberia, the two of them did a Cabaret show as well they both collaborated with members of our faculty for a noon-hour show. Then she did masterclasses and lessons (one of which I accompanied) and he did a Q&A session because he doesn't do masterclasses or teach. He's quite famous for not teaching. But because he likes our school so much (I guess) he gave four one-hour lessons to four senior students. I was not able to get one since I was in first year, but he is apparently going to be coming back for a similar residency in my fourth year, so maybe then I'll be able to be one of hte few lucky ones in the world who can say they had a lesson with Marc-Andre Hamelin.

As a musician I think he's absolutely amazing and brilliant. Obviously he can play anything, although he said in the Q&A session that he disagrees with people (like those in this forum) who say he has the world's greatest technique. Of course the repertoire he tackles is itself worthy of much respect but he is also annoyed by that, saying he is just as comfortable in the standard repertoire and includes it just as regularly in his performing schedule. I have listend to his first Schumann disc and I must agree, it is stunning and just as fine musicianship as any of the unheard of repertoire that he unearths

This last March he came with the WSO to Brandon to play the Busoni Piano Concerto. It had to be the most amazing concert I have ever experienced. To see all the amazing things he was able to do is such an amazing experience. And even when playing the most virtuostic sections (and there are TONNES of them) I was so amazed by how there was still a clear musical line. It was such an exhilerating experience, one that can only be captured in a live performance.

I personally do consider him my "favorite" pianist alive and I find him very deeply musical and emotionally moving, it works for me, not for other people I'm sure. He has a Haydn disc coming out and I do believe a disc of Brahms chamber music which I'm very excited to hear and he mentioned in 2004 that he's always wanted to record the Schubert B-flat Sonata, and I can only hope Hyperion allows him to.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 12:11 am 
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I'll be hearing Hamelin in Philadelphia tomorrow evening. The last two times I heard him live were profoundly amazing and I think I'm being reasonable in expecting the same again.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2007 7:34 pm 
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My expectations were exceeded. It was very profoundly amazing. My legs started wobbling during the second half, despite the fact that there was no reason they should have been doing that. I was floating around for hours afterward.

(Bonus: my nice new Edirol sat under my front-row seat.)


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 6:21 am 
That's fantastic, what did he play??


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 7:19 am 
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Here's the official program. For a first encore he played his own left-hand arrangement of Tchaikovsky's Lullaby (Op. 16, No. 1); for a second he played Debussy's Feux d'Artifice. I had to leave then (last Chinatown bus back to NYC), so I don't know what may have followed.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 6:35 pm 
A pretty interesting program. When he was at my school, he talked about wanting to record Schubert's Bb Sonata but Hyperion didn't want him to, or someone didn't want him to anyway. But I have noticed he's played it on some recital programs. I can only imagine how amazing that would be. If I cannot hear it myself I hope I find someone that has heard Hamelin take a run at it.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2007 9:17 pm 
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well, I started with un sospiro for conservatory and the recording of youtube played by the great pianist is my goal. If I can play it like him I think that it will be good haha :lol:

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while composing I've got always an picture in my head 'beethoven'


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2007 5:47 pm 
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He just played the 92nd St. Y in New York. Here's the Times review: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/30/arts/ ... 0hame.html

The two encore pieces were the same as his Philadelphia recital a couple months ago. This time I got to stick around for Feux d'artifice. The sound of the downward glissando near the end, held briefly with the pedal, was unbelievably rich. Wow, wow, wow.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2007 9:25 am 
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I saw Marc-Andre’ Hamelin last night in Chicago. It was a perfect warm summer night and we have in Chicago a new ( 2 or 3 years old) outside concert venue at what is called Millennium Park. The concerts are free and you bring a picnic dinner, some chairs or blankets and park yourself down on the lawn. The orchestra played Beethoven’s 8th Symphony and then Hamelin played the Brahms 2nd Piano Concerto. (I love the last movement) I was too far away to watch his hands and feet closely, but he played really, really well, as this whole pieces sounds very hard. I will have to one day see him perform again when he plays a recital and I can see better. If you’re interested, I posted some pictures of the stage and other things over in the old “post your pictures” thread, so you can say ‘hi’ to me over there.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 8:37 pm 
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He's closing out the IKIF in New York this Saturday. Can't wait!


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