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 Post subject: Introductory Debussy
PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 8:42 pm 
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Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2007 2:55 pm
Posts: 32
Location: Chester
Hi everyone. Would someone recommend some introductory (i.e., not too technically difficult) Debussy to play? I have a reasonable standard of playing (diploma) but have never played any Debussy. I'm also not under the tutelage of a teacher, so wouldn't really want to have a go at some too complicated as I've never played any of his music before.

Any recommendations (apart from Childrens' Corner!) welcome, thanks.

Mark


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 Post subject: Re: Introductory Debussy
PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 11:26 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
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Location: Netherlands
Well, Children's Corner is not at all easy. Quite deceptive in fact.
If you are looking for the 'easiest' pieces you automatically come up with the ones that are played most: Clair de Lune, the Arabesques, the Fille aux Cheveux de Lin, and The Little Negro. Not a very original choice, and not really 'characteristic' Debussy. You might want to try the Sarabande from Pour le Piano or the Hommage a Rameau from the Images Book I. Or Le Plus Que Lente, it's a bit of work but worth every trouble.

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 Post subject: Re: Introductory Debussy
PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2012 11:47 pm 
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Hi Markie,

Reverie is another early composition by Debussy that is fairly technically simple. However, this would probably fall under techneut's list of "not 'characteristic' Debussy". I have no idea what a performance diploma entails so I don't know how good of a pianist you are, but I would recommend looking through both books of preludes. Most of them are somewhat difficult, but you may find a few that are perfect for you. Also, you can always browse the recordings on this site. If I'm not mistaken all of Debussy's piano works are featured here.

Have a great time with Debussy!
David


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 Post subject: Re: Introductory Debussy
PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2012 11:51 pm 
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Location: Chester
Thanks for the responses. Reverie looks like a good choice :)


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 Post subject: Re: Introductory Debussy
PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2012 7:46 am 
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Ah yes, I should have mentioned Reverie. A good place to start indeed. The part in the recapitulation where the melody alternates between hands is a bit tricky.

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Chris Breemer


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 Post subject: Re: Introductory Debussy
PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2012 5:10 pm 
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Would you recommend playing it as written and taking parts of the melody with the left hand? When I tackled Reverie I tried that, but found that it was easier for me to take the upper notes with my left hand and play the entire melodic portion with my right. It helped me maintain a smooth melodic line that I was unable to achieve playing it as written. Of course, then I had the problem of the upper notes being a bit harder to control and often I landed a bit too jarringly on the first note of each descending line :oops:


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 Post subject: Re: Introductory Debussy
PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2012 5:14 pm 
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I can't remember what exactly I did there, but I do remember it took me a while to get the hang of it. Somehow I found these bars difficult to learn.
I'll check and get back.

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Chris Breemer


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 Post subject: Re: Introductory Debussy
PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2012 6:12 pm 
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Location: Springfield, Missouri, USA
dctpianist wrote:
When I tackled Reverie I tried that, but found that it was easier for me to take the upper notes with my left hand and play the entire melodic portion with my right.
Absolutely! Cross over.

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"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


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 Post subject: Re: Introductory Debussy
PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2012 4:30 pm 
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dctpianist wrote:
Would you recommend playing it as written and taking parts of the melody with the left hand?

Personally I would. I can see why some would prefer to cross-over, but the jump is rather too risky imo.

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