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 Post subject: Chanson pour une vie
PostPosted: Tue May 03, 2011 4:29 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 03, 2011 2:40 pm
Posts: 22
Hello, musicians. My name is Christian Perrotta, I'm Brazilian and 21 years old. I have never studied music in a school or elsewhere. I learnt it all by myself. Only now I'm studying music at the university.

This is a composition of mine that people seemed to like (some friends and friends of friends). However, I've never had an opinion from musicians about my music. I'd like to have any comment, criticism, praise etc. What else you'd like to add to my compositional process.

Thanks


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 Post subject: Re: Chanson pour une vie
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 1:57 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:28 am
Posts: 1250
Location: Springfield, Missouri, USA
Hello Christian,
Well this work bears the traits of exploration and discovery. I can hear you exploring with this piece. The basic harmonic language is Common Practice Period (meaning the pervasive use of tertian harmony (chords of stacked 3rds) and functional tonality), but you don't yet seem to understand the principle of Closely Related Keys (simply put they differ by only one degree (added or subtracted) in the key signature, whether major or minor mode*) and how to move from one to another (modulation). From about the 20-40 second mark, you use chromatic tones that are out of context. As a composer you must a have a reason for every note you write, understanding it's purpose and context. Your texture is basic, and known as treble-dominant or homophonic in that there is a high melody part supported by harmonic activity below: a lot of great music has been written this way. There seemed to be some shift(s) of meter (not tempo) that were not immediately inteligible. The most difficult thing you will likley need to tackle is to understand harmony, funtional tonality, how to use non-chord tones (dissonance), and form (the larger shape of musical works). This is no easy task and is in fact the reason many go to college/university/conservatory to be instructed in. Music is a language, and as such it has its grammar, cadences, syntax, lexicon, and literary forms, not to mention styles. It is no minor task to prepare oneself to be sufficiently skilled to compose. If you have patience and tremendous dedication, to the point of great sacrifice, then this is something you will be able to develop. You are not too old, but most your age pursuing composition would already know all the basic science of this art. As with any other artist, you learn the craft and the history of those before you. Then you may be able to contribute something new and interesting. Good luck and study very hard! :)

Regards,
Eddy


* e.g.: F major/ D minor - C major/A minor - G major/E minor. (6 closely related keys)

_________________
Eddy M. del Rio, MD
"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


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 Post subject: Re: Chanson pour une vie
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 1:58 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9889
Location: Netherlands
This is the same point I am always making - though without all the factual information. One cannot just start composing out of the blue,
unless one has tremendous originality. And even then, some basics have to be learnt (spelling :P ) Clumsy harmonies and modulations usually give away amateur compositions, as well as a lack of development and purpose. Everybody can dream up a tune (though few can dream up a GOOD tune) but to do something interesting with it, that will capture a listener for more than 10 seconds, is another matter. The biggest mistake IMO, one that many make, is to doodle for 5 or 10 minutes minutes around a single idea (a Ravel could do that in his Bolero, but that's another ballgame). If you have little material, keep it short. That is one of the reasons while Riley's piece 'Despair' is good, it knows when to stop.

Sorry to be a bit critical, Christian. Nonetheless, welcome to PS, and thanks for your feedback on other composition efforts.

_________________
Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


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 Post subject: Re: Chanson pour une vie
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 5:25 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 03, 2011 2:40 pm
Posts: 22
Thank you so much, guys, for listening and helping me. You don't need to be sorry due to the criticism. That's what we need! There would be no purpose to post a composition here just to be praised.

Well, understand very well what are closely related keys. However, I do unterstand too that I don't HAVE to modulate to a closely related key. I started with the key of E major, but I decided to go to A minor! In fact, I challenged me to fo that. The main idea (the A minor melody) existed before the introduction. So I started the introduction in another distant key and gradually reached the A minor in chromatic progressions.

I'm not an expert in Harmony, I'm still studying it with the book Harmony, by Schoenberg. I've been using this new knowledge in some compositions, but this one is an older one, so yes, it's very exploratory!

Well, your comments will certainly be in my mind the next time I'll start a composition.

Thank you again


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 Post subject: Re: Chanson pour une vie