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 Post subject: Haydn Music
PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2007 6:33 pm 
Hey,

I'm quite new to the forum so let's begin. I'm playing the piano for five years now (I'm 20)
I played the trombone before that. Practically none of the compositions I've played ,apart from a small G Major Sonatina, was Haydn's.
I wondered, what Haydn Sonatas would you recommend to study, that is, which of his many sonatas really worth their while.

thank you,


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 Post subject: Re: Haydn Music
PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2007 8:56 pm 
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liad007 wrote:
I'm quite new to the forum so let's begin. I'm playing the piano for five years now (I'm 20)
I played the trombone before that. Practically none of the compositions I've played ,apart from a small G Major Sonatina, was Haydn's.
I wondered, what Haydn Sonatas would you recommend to study, that is, which of his many sonatas really worth their while.

Hi, welcome to the forum ! I have not heard all the Haydn Sonatas, but I believe whichever one you pick, it will give you pleasure and opportunity to learn. You could start with checking out the ones that are on our main site.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 7:09 pm 
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i like sonata in D by haydn or gypsy rondo


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 7:40 pm 
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The gypsy rondo looks like it is very hard to play. But it also looks like it is a piece deserving a standing ovation too. :wink:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 4:04 pm 
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no, no i played gypsy rondo, if i can play it, anyone can, but u'll be proud of urself when u complete it, the finale is satisfying! u can do it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 6:59 pm 
Well then! :) I'll try the sonata in D and the gypsy rondo...I happen to have both!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2008 2:42 pm 
I was wondering how the gypsy rondo is going? I'm playing it too, so I was interested in your progress.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2008 7:08 pm 
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Location: Obamanation, unfortunately...
Is this the Gypsy Rondo that you are talking about? How can this piece be easy? This piece looks like it has its own set of problems and hard spots, and playing at a "presto" tempo? Ha! More difficult than easy :?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2008 6:11 pm 
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I'm sure I've heard this Gypsy Rondo theme a thousand times (not knowing it was by Haydn) but I just can't place it, and it's driving me nuts! Can someone help? Was it a Disney cartoon? Tutu-clad dancing hippos? Bugs Bunny?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2008 3:51 pm 
well it was in the 1995 A&E version of Pride and Prejudice, though I can' think of a disney movie that had it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2008 3:37 am 
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Thanks! Actually I may have solved the mystery myself through a little 'research' (google, YouTube...).
Seems this Rondo is the final movement (billed on that occasion as Rondo alla Zingarese) of a Trio that I heard in concert only two months ago, which would explain why it was so intensely recognizable -- but I got sidetracked by the lack of context, the rough parallel of the contour of the opening phrase with the Pizzicato Polka, etc.

I recall now that in the January performance when the Rondo movement began I thought I recognized the tune but it didn't then seem as familiar as it does now :-)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2008 6:07 pm 
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walter.trice wrote:
Thanks! Actually I may have solved the mystery myself through a little 'research' (google, YouTube...).
Seems this Rondo is the final movement (billed on that occasion as Rondo alla Zingarese) of a Trio that I heard in concert only two months ago, which would explain why it was so intensely recognizable -- but I got sidetracked by the lack of context, the rough parallel of the contour of the opening phrase with the Pizzicato Polka, etc.

I recall now that in the January performance when the Rondo movement began I thought I recognized the tune but it didn't then seem as familiar as it does now :-)


Ahhhh... is that the Brahms Piano Trio (Which I want to say is in C Minor, maybe?)

I seem to remember one of his piano trios featuring the Rondo Alla Zingarese...
I suppose I'd best pull out my iPod then to find out...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2008 6:52 pm 
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NO! I lied... I just checked my iPod. The rondo is from Brahms Piano Quartet No. 1 in G Minor, movement 4.

I just listened to it again, and ... omg. It's insane! Especially near the end, when everything kicks up in speed to an insane degree... it's too bad I don't have the sheets for it... not that I could learn it anyways, 1.) It's too hard. 2.) I'm too busy with some other stuff I'm supposed to (key word, "supposed") be learning.

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"This is death! This is death as this emanation of the female which leads to unification ... death and love ... this is the abyss." This is not music", said [Sabaneev] to him, "this is something else..." - "This is the Mysterium," he said softly.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 1:05 am 
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Play the sonata no.50 in key of C Major.
The one that starts with staccatossimos.
Its a great piece and excellent for improving your touch and colour.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 1:10 am 
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Assuming that 'insane' means you like it, you might also enjoy a ballet choreographed to Arnold Schoenberg's orchestration of the Rondo from Brahms's quartet: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Abt-Ho9Gz5Q


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:34 pm 
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walter.trice wrote:
Assuming that 'insane' means you like it, you might also enjoy a ballet choreographed to Arnold Schoenberg's orchestration of the Rondo from Brahms's quartet: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Abt-Ho9Gz5Q


Hmmmm... nice to see Schoenberg actually doing something good with himself for once... Hehehehe... just kidding. I know that some people actually like his music a lot... so I'll shut up about that now...

Also: I'm insane as it is. Thus, when I refer to something as "insane", that means that I find it absolutely marvelous (unless otherwise noted). I love the energetic, dark, angry pieces. They make me happy.

The ballet one was very intresting. I enjoyed it thouroughly. Thanks for posting that.

_________________
"This is death! This is death as this emanation of the female which leads to unification ... death and love ... this is the abyss." This is not music", said [Sabaneev] to him, "this is something else..." - "This is the Mysterium," he said softly.


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 Post subject: Re: Haydn Music
PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 5:06 pm 
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Quote:
I wondered, what Haydn Sonatas would you recommend to study, that is, which of his many sonatas really worth their while.


My two favorites of the Haydn sonatas are Nos. 50 in C (as Hunwoo suggested) and 62 in E-flat. The most recent Haydn sonata I learned was the E-flat and it is one of the more virtuosic sonatas of his (as virtuosic as Haydn gets, anyway). It is also very beautiful, with lovely melodies intertwining themselves in all three movements.

A thorough study of either of these sonatas would definitely help you improve musically and technically.


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