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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 3:09 pm 
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OMG!!!! :shock: I leave for a week and half camping trip with the monsters and you're almost done already!!!! hehehehe

I checked at local library and that's a no-go ... so I'm gonna go order from Amazon upon finishing this post. thank goodness ya'll are reading slowly! :)

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"You see, my piano is for me what his ship is to a sailor; more indeed: it is my very self, my mother tongue, my life." - Franz Liszt


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 4:07 pm 
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OK, book is ordered and will be here mañana! yippee!!!

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 8:03 pm 
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Wow, that's fast, Nathan! Read up to chapter 14 as fast as you can. You will be happy to know that they are short chapters.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 8:44 pm 
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Wow, that´s great, Nathan, that we get a third reader. It´s a nice book.

Today my order arrived and I have received the normal book of our novel from the bookshop I have ordered it first, but they have said to me, that there are problems of delivery. Until now I have only read in my e-book-version on my computer. Although I had annuled this order (,because I had bought it already as an e-book), they send it to me, strange isn´t it?
Now my wife said, that she wants to read it eventually, too. So, I didn´t send back the consignment I received, but I think, I´ll keep it.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 12:57 pm 
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Ok, I have read chapter 14. I think it was interesting learning about piano tuners. And also the fact that the ear should be trained to listen to piano strings early - like before a person turns 25 years old. Guess it is too late for me then!

I have watched my tuner tune my piano many times. He uses a laptop computer but also sometimes uses only his ear. It amazes me how he can hear the slightest of pitch changes.

And I also think it is neat for a piano craftsman to sign his name in some hidden place inside the piano. I would if it were me. In fact, I have signed my name all over my house - inside walls, under stairs, etc. We did some major home improvements when we first moved into the house I live in now. Build new walls, took out flooring, things like that. Whenever we built new walls, my husband and I, even our kids sometimes, signed our names before the new drywall (sheet rock) (plaster board)(there are several names for this material)went up.

My tuner has also signed and dated his name inside my piano. Just on one of the keys. I bought my piano new, and the first time he tuned it is when he did that. It is to make a reference for anyone to know a little bit as to the date of my piano. Whether there any other names inside my piano, I do not know.

Ok, on to chapter 15. Remember - no need to rush. Plus, it will give Nathan time to catch up.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 8:03 pm 
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Oh, Andreas - I'm just sneaking in here for a moment to tell you something. I'm reading chapter 15 right now, and found something in it that you will like! :)

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 9:31 pm 
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Hi Monica,
I was really to curious to read on, so that I have finished chapter 15. (Sorry, Nathan, but you can write something also to the previous chapters and we could discuss it, if you like, this would be very nice anyway.)

Thank you for your nice advice, Monica. I can imagine, what you mean. :) There is mentioned an old Grotrian-Steinweg-grand from the 20th, which was restored for an old lady. :wink:
In this chapter I find interesting Luc´s behaviour to people, who have to sell their pianos, but are not in fact ready to separate from them. He is full of respect and comprehension. I think, his idea, that the people should burn their old pianos, if they aren´t to repair and to use anymore and to cook their sausages on them, is a good one. So, they could process their close to a certain part of their lifes better, I suppose, as if they just give it away and always remember it and suffer from this. What do you think?

I think, Carhart does narrate in a sensitive and descriptive manner of singular fates related to pianos. This is very interesting and increases the pleasure to read this subtle work of literature.

I really ask me, if pianos in our times of today still have so much meaning to so many people like it is described in the book. (Though it´s written in 2000, isn´t it?) I´m sure, there still exists men, who feel so and who can find themselves in the novel of Carhart, but the number of them probably decreases, I suppose. Do you agree?

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 9:51 pm 
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So, book is in ... I just read first chapter and had to come comment. first of all, yummy yummy writing, no? "voluptuous fantasy" .... wow

In any case, I'm too poor to be reading this book ... I can already tell it's gonna wake up buried desires that I've long been repressing ... hence, ya'll will have to listen to me whine about my pitiable POS baldwin upright. My wife would have an attack if I tried to get a real piano. *sigh*

Ok, gonna go get the kids and will catch up to ya'll this evening.

PS-- my book has an afterword with notes for a book club. how funny is that??

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"You see, my piano is for me what his ship is to a sailor; more indeed: it is my very self, my mother tongue, my life." - Franz Liszt


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 10:09 pm 
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I'm supposed to be working right now, but I'm not. haha

I'll write notes on chapter 15 later. Nathan - yes, go ahead and post any thoughts you have on the earlier chapters.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 12:08 am 
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ok, brief post before supper .... I just finished ch9.

When he brought home his piano, I actually got a little turned on ... I love his description of those first moments .... reminded me of my first time with the missus. Quite sweet actually.

And I do that thing too with pianos ... I have to touch and open them, wherever I am ... wholly inappropriate if completely voyeuristic. It was also humbling to realize how little I really know about the workings of the instrument. Of course, i've never been with a piano I love so much. I'm sure that would make a difference.

What was your first public performance like? I really had trouble identifying with his terrifying experience ... I remember my first recital and I loved it (being the quiet and introvert type that you all know me to be). And I always played for guests at house constantly. Only recently do I not perform for others ... unless you count the competing with spongebob for the kid's attention! heh

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 1:25 am 
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Good – you are catching up fast, Nathan.

I never lift the lid of pianos I see in different places and play them. I’m too chicken. Although a couple years ago I was in Liberace’s museum and took a picture of one of his pianos with my cell phone camera. I had to sneak it!

I can very much relate to our character's terrifying experience at his recital. I get that way now! Nerves didn’t bother me as much when I was younger. Don’t remember my first recitals, but I do remember the one when I was 12 and played a Chopin Waltz. It was my first Chopin piece and I felt like a grown-up playing it.

But I absolutely hated playing for people when they came to our home. When I was very young, like between 5 and 13, every time my parent’s friends came over, they always said, “Let’s hear little Monica play something.” I was extremely shy back then and would try to run and hide. There was one solution to the problem, though: We had a grand piano in the living room and an upright piano downstairs, so to help alleviate my fear, I was allowed to go downstairs and play that piano, while everyone else stayed upstairs and listened.

How about you, Andreas – what was your first public performing experience like?



more book time – regarding chapter 14 – burning an old piano and cooking your sausage over the fire. Well, I have never done that! Actually, I’ve never seen a piano being burned. I think that would make me cry a little.

I dunno – I think people today still get hooked on their pianos. It might be that I am too biased, though. I get hooked on anything that I happen to like and then I don’t want to part with it. Others may not feel as sentimental about objects. Not really sure what I think about this one….

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 3:01 pm 
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that imagery of burning a piano was a bit shocking and sacreligious at first ... but now I think maybe it'd be cathartic. Kindof like a wake for an beloved family member I guess.

I don't think sausages though ... smores maybe??

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 4:12 pm 
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I love smores!

Nathan, looks like you have definitely caught up!

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 5:12 pm 
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Pianolady wrote:
Quote:
How about you, Andreas – what was your first public performing experience like?


My first performing experience was, when I played guitar before my class in elementary school. I was seven years old. I think, I have played some melodies of well-known songs and little pieces of my guitar-school (Dieter Kreidler, Gitarrenschule, Band 1).
I have enjoyed it and got much applause!

BTW, what are "smores"? I couldn´t find the word in the dictionary.

Nathan, wow, I can´t imagine, how someone can read so fastly a book, and even in English :lol: . I have needed two weeks for coming to chapter 15.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 6:08 pm 
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This is how you make a smore:

1. build a fire

2. find a long stick

3. Stick a marshmallow on the end of the stick and then stick it in the fire. :lol:

4. The marshmallow may catch on fire, but that's ok - just blow it out.

5. Then take a graham cracker and break it into two equal pieces (squares).

6. Take half of a Hershey chocolate bar and but it on one of the graham cracker squares.

7. Then put the hot marshmallow on top of the chocolate and put the other graham cracker square on top of that.

8. What you get is like a sandwich - graham cracker, chocolate bar and marshmallow. Because the marshmallow is hot, it starts to melt the chocolate and the whole thing gets a little gooey. It's messy to eat, but it sure is super yummy!

Ok, I'm reading chapter 16 now.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 7:10 pm 
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Thanks, Monica. Sounds really tasty.
First I´ll play a bit Chopin, thenI´ll read chapter 16.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 8:17 pm 
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Ok, I just finished ch. 16.

I like that music school that Thad found for his children. And isn't it neat that Debussy and Albeniz (others as well) also studied there? I am hoping to go to Paris in a couple years. If I do, I will try to find this building. I'm also going to visit every place where Chopin visited and lived. Maybe if I am lucky, his ghost will pay me a visit me too. :D

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 9:21 pm 
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Phew, I have finished chapter 16. :D
Yes, it´s really a school full of history and atmosphere, I think. I like Thads idea, to look for a piano-teacher for his daughter, which will motivate her and not to teach her "solfège". This kind of theory has made me dislike music, too, when I was a child. I still could play the guitar, which I learned in private lessons, and sight-read, when I had to learn "solfège" at the civic music-school, where I first started to learn Cello with 11 years. After a half year I stopped with this (very beautiful and soulful) instrument and changed to piano, because this was my very wish.
It must be a very interesting atmosphere with all the old Erards, Pleyels and Gaveaus on the one side and the more modern instruments on the other there in the Schola Cantorum.
My tuner says, that the individual characters of the piano-brands decrease more and more, because they all try to approach to the Steinway-like piano-building and give up their old manners to built pianos. As an example he mentioned Bechstein. They always said, that their manner is better and that they don´t need steinway-like building-manner, but now they have taken over some techniques of piano-building, which Steinway uses.

All this development is really a pity IMO! Sometimes I wished to have lived in 19th century. :roll: May be we should open a synthesizer-forum to stay up to date and write a book called "The synthesizer-shop on the right bank", isn´t it? Oh my dears, we are on the headed south. :wink: :lol:

Monica, if you´ll meet the ghost of Chopin, tell him, I´ll try my very best to play his third Scherzo and send him my regards! 8) :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 5:58 am 
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I wonder why albeniz is so neglected in comparison with some others??

It must be a joy to be surrounded with so much sound. I find myself quite envious of Thad.

andreas, I read ridiculously fast ... just like I make love! :? I'm trying to rein myself in and go at same pace as you guys ... so I'm reading other books while we do this one together! ... if only I could use my powers for good ....

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 12:38 pm 
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Albeniz was very good friends with Granados.Image

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 4:44 pm 
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very VERY?? good friends?? hhmm

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 5:23 pm 
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How good was the "very"? :shock: :wink:

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 6:07 pm 
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Oh, you guys....:lol:

I'll explain in a few minutes. Just walked in the door from shopping and have to unload my car.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 6:37 pm 
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Ok, I'm back. (not that you knew I was gone - LOL)

Anyway, Albeniz and Granados were not that THAT close. I put that heart next to my last post because I love Granados! If I could go back in time and meet with him, I would flirt with him a little. Well, maybe a lot.

Granados and Albeniz were just good friends. They hung out with each other almost daily, usually in a cafe where they ate the wrong kinds of foods, drank too much wine, smoked too many cigars, talked about their problems, told about all the women in their lives, (secret love affairs) etc... Each of them had their own health problems because of that kind of lifestyle. When Albeniz died, he had not yet finished a piece of music he was working on, and so his wife or daughter - can't remember which one - asked Granados to finish the piece, which he did. I think that is kind of touching - don't you?

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 9:53 pm 
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Pianolady wrote:
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Oh, you guys....


You really touch me with this, Monica.Image


Seriously, wow, that were really friends. That´s very nice and very touching.Image

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 10:32 pm 
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You are funny, Andreas. I bet you spend more time looking for just the right smiley than on actually typing out your comments! haha ( I do too - LOL) (I'm too lazy right now put one up right this second).

Ok - Chapter 17:

That poor piano! My goodness, I can’t believe how terrible Jos behaved!

I can relate to Anna paying him anyway just so that he would leave and to prevent something else bad from happening. My tuner has never done anything wrong to me or to my piano. He is a very nice and normal guy. But when I think about it, he comes to my home when I am by myself. If he were to become ‘weird’, I would pay him so he would leave right away too.

And what do you guys think about Anna and Thad talking about how they can ‘escape’ into a different place in their minds when they play music. That’s exactly how it is with me. I am most of the time making up a story in my mind when I play. It’s not always good to do that though, because often times I get to the end of a piece without realizing I just played the whole thing. I really should have been working on some technical issue and instead just wasted all that time with my fantasizing! So then I have to back to the beginning…

What say you both?

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 12:43 am 
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O.k., chapter 17 was a sad one somehow. It´s really sad, that Luc seems to be an alcoholic and at the end it isn´t clear, if he had replaced also the broken string in Annas Bechstein. It´s just clear, that he has retuned the piano and that he has done this properly now.
I had good luck until now, because never a string break down in any of my pianos until today. (O.k. anytime there will be the first time, I think.) But I knew, that a new string has to be retuned several times, until it sounds correctly.

I seldom can be absent, if I play piano, Monica. I´m mostly very concentrated. In the case it´s a piece I know well and if I´m not concentrated I can play it through while thinking on other things, f.ex. what happened in my school-lessons or similar. If it´s a new piece (or a more complicated one), I´m not able to play it properly through, if I´m not truely concentrated.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 4:30 am 
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It's not Luc that is the alcoholic, but the piano tuner, Jos.

I have never broken a string, either. I have never even seen a broken string.

But Andreas, are you saying that you broke a string today? How did that happen? What were you playing? Did it make a loud noise when it broke? Did it shoot out of the piano? Did you jump?

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 11:28 am 
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Pianolady wrote:
Quote:
It's not Luc that is the alcoholic, but the piano tuner, Jos.


That´s what I meant, when I told you, that I´m an absent-minded professor sometimes. :roll: I´ve read so much literature (because of my profession of a German-teacher), that in moments, I´m tired and not more so concentrated, it easily happens to me, that I change names of the figures of the novel. Of course, I knew, that´s Jos.

Quote:
I have never even seen a broken string.


I have seen some during my life, but fortunately on other pianos than mine.

Quote:
But Andreas, are you saying that you broke a string today? How did that happen? What were you playing? Did it make a loud noise when it broke? Did it shoot out of the piano? Did you jump?


No Monica, that´s also fortunately a missunderstanding. May be I didn´t express me correctly. I have never broken a string, not today either. I just think: anytime always could be the first time, so it´s possibel (and probable), that it´ll happen to me and to most pianists one day. (Especially to such wild players like me. :wink: :lol: )

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 2:49 pm 
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Chapters 18 and 19 are short, so here is my summary on both.

Chap. 18 – Thad is finally getting his pedal brace. And what quirky behavior from that locksmith. It does seem like a complicated relationship between the business owners in that little neighborhood. I think that is kind of neat, though; like a sort of ‘you rub my back, and I’ll rub yours’ kind of way. And weren’t you excited to know about the new Erard coming in? And especially if Luc was actually going to receive it?

Chap. 19 – Never mind the Erard, now we have what could actually be Beethoven’s piano! Wow! I would love to have seen that. And now we clearly know why Beethoven seemed to easily smash pianos – they did not have the metal frame yet.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 8:48 pm 
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Hi MOnica,
this weekend I had only time for the first half of chapter 18. I think, I need a little break now, because at this time I have very much to do for my job.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2009 4:09 am 
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No problem, Andreas. Whenever you feel like posting something is fine. Nathan has probably read the whole book by now, and I am just sort of following you guys. So we will all just go with the flow.
(that means to take it day to day)

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2009 2:19 pm 
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No, actually ... I didn't read it at all over the weekend .... although it's KILLING me not to know!!!

anyway, I thought the drunk Jos was hysterical ... I don't know why, but I couldn't stop laughing at his really horrible behaviour.

I too like to go other places when I play. I loved your comment thought about suddenly being at the end of a piece and wondering where the rest of the music went!!! hehe

Gonna catch up to you this morn. So, bbl.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 2:31 pm 
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I would like to play on some of these pre-iron harp pianos.
I remember when I was really being forced to perform Mozart at about 12-13 years old, I complained to teacher at time "I feel like I'm being squished into a too-small box". I now think about how frustrating it must have been for those composing greats of time to be confined to a lesser sound than they wished.

I'm starting to wonder if Luc is a smuggler?? That scene with the blacksmith was bizarre. Is there a piano black-market?

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Yeah - poor Beethoven. At least Liszt was around when the piano he needed came to be.

And Nathan, was it that the Mozart pieces you were playing felt like 'small' pieces and therefore you weren't interested in playing them, or were you playing on a different instrument?

A piano black market - hmmm. Wouldn't surprise me. There are piano collectors who probably get into some shady dealings to get the piano they want.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 5:18 pm 
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I played on a modern piano. The rigidity of style and lightness of tone irritated me in pre-romantic music. It made me feel boxed-in ... not free, as with the romantics and later. Of course, now I understand why it made me feel as such.

In any case, just read ch20 whilst stirring the chefboyardee for the monsters. I'd love to do a master class sometime, although I'm finding myself oddly intimidated playing for others (especially knowledgeables) now. Never had a care before. do a google search on feuchtwanger ... interesting stuff ... similar to abby whiteside's philosophy it seems. I believe in this too ... makes mastering technical difficulties much easier.



ps - thinking about next book for club. I have two nominations but we don't have to do them first. I read them as teenager and had a big impression ... would love to revisit them with you guys! The first one is titled "Solo" by Jack Higgins. It's was great fun ... a concert pianist/assassin tours the world.

The other is called "Fingers" by William Sleator. here's the synopsis: Eighteen-year-old Sam has always been jealous of his younger brother, Humphrey, the famous “wonder child” pianist. But now that Humphrey is fifteen, the one-time child prodigy isn’t able to get any more bookings. Sam’s mother refuses to accept that Humphrey’s career is over and devises a scheme to recapture his fame: Sam will compose “new works” by a long dead gypsy composer, and they will tell the world that the composer is dictating the music to Humphrey from the grave. The scheme is a wild success—until some ghostly occurrences convince Sam that the spirit of the dead composer has actually taken over Humphrey’s fingers. Have Sam and his family unleashed a force from beyond the grave?

This second book started my obsession with Liszt. Although a fictional composer in the novel, it seemed loosely based on Liszt. Anyway, let me know what ya'll think when we finish with this one. I'm THOUROUGHLY enjoying this so far!

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haha - well, I just inhaled a plate of spaghetti because I was starving.

I'm ready to read chapter 20, just kind of waiting. I'll do it later today.

And all those books sound great! I think I've read Jack Higgins before but I can't remember what. But that "Fingers" book sounds like something right up my alley. Reminds me of another book I read a couple years ago about a woman whose body is taken over by Franz Schubert. She can suddenly play piano like an expert, stuns the teachers of Juilliard and then Schubert leads her to his 'Unfinished Symphony'.

So let's go for Fingers next. Maybe we can round up some more members too?

Ok, I'm going to look up that word now after I finish up doing a new member.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 7:10 pm 
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pianolady wrote:


Ok, I'm going to look up that word now after I finish up doing a new member.


HHMMMMMM ..... man, when I signed up all I got was a handshake from Chris and a distant wave from Robert! :lol: 8)

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 7:20 pm 
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nathanscoleman wrote:
pianolady wrote:


Ok, I'm going to look up that word now after I finish up doing a new member.


HHMMMMMM ..... man, when I signed up all I got was a handshake from Chris and a distant wave from Robert! :lol: 8)




Image

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aha ha ha - very funny. You both better watch it, or I'll give you a Chinese foot massage. (they hurt!):lol:

And that word, feuchtwanger. I thought it was a kind of sausage, but it looks like it's a person, right? I only briefly glanced at some articles. Not sure where it says anything about mastering technical difficulties.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 8:07 pm 
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*striving to contain a sausage joke* :cry:

In any case, when you read ch20 ... he conducts a masterclass.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 10:00 pm 
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I haven´t still read chapter 20, but I think, I´ll find some time at the weekend. (I have read ch. 18 now and will start tomorrow with ch. 19.)
Lion Feuchtwanger (1884-1958) was a famous german author, well known for his historical novel like f.ex. "Jud süß", "Die hässliche Herzogin Margarete Maultasch" and the "Josephus-Trilogie". So, a bit another "thing" as a sausage, alas! :lol: Or may be you mean Wilhelm Furtwängler, which was a famous conductor?
Don´t know, if that helps you.

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peter feuchtwanger actually

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Ah, o.k., the pianist with his method of a physiological, psychological cure at the piano...Didn´t come on this thought first... :roll:

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I just finished reading chapter 20 and found it very interesting! It hit on a couple points I am currently dealing with. The first is what Feuchtwanger teaches. I’ve heard others talk about that same philosophy about staying in a relaxed position, striking the note, and then going back to a centered repose. My own teacher has tried to get me to that too, because much of my tendonitis problem stems from remaining tense all the time when I play.

I’m working on a piece with a difficult LH fast ascending arpeggio and when I do actually remember to relax, it goes better. However, I can’t relax too much or it doesn’t go at all. For me, I have to tell my brain to relax and don’t get so nervous about that arpeggio coming up. But when I actually start on it, I have to play really hard and forcefully to get it to go to the top.

The other point I found interesting is when he admonished the young student when she didn’t want to take a repeat. I liked when Feuchtwanger said, "A repeat is never the same." Made me think of that Bach Aria in which you can play the ornaments differently in the repeats. Remember talking about that, Andreas? I was thinking of not doing a repeat in the same piece I’m working on that I mentioned up above, but now I think I will.

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PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 4:58 pm 
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Pianolady wrote:
Quote:
I just finished reading chapter 20 and found it very interesting! It hit on a couple points I am currently dealing with. The first is what Feuchtwanger teaches. I’ve heard others talk about that same philosophy about staying in a relaxed position, striking the note, and then going back to a centered repose. My own teacher has tried to get me to that too, because much of my tendonitis problem stems from remaining tense all the time when I play.


Oh, Monica, I didn´t know, that you have such a problem. I´m just going to read chapter 20 now and then I´ll write you my opinion to that. But I know, that an artificial tension all the time while playing is not a good thing.

Quote:
I’m working on a piece with a difficult LH fast ascending arpeggio and when I do actually remember to relax, it goes better. However, I can’t relax too much or it doesn’t go at all. For me, I have to tell my brain to relax and don’t get so nervous about that arpeggio coming up. But when I actually start on it, I have to play really hard and forcefully to get it to go to the top.


My tip is: try not to think of it. Think of other things f.ex. or nothing and try to let through the music itself. The best way to solve problems is to let them and not to think of the problem, because we make them ourself (even if it is unconscious). I know, that this is easier said as done.

Quote:
The other point I found interesting is when he admonished the young student when she didn’t want to take a repeat. I liked when Feuchtwanger said, "A repeat is never the same." Made me think of that Bach Aria in which you can play the ornaments differently in the repeats. Remember talking about that, Andreas? I was thinking of not doing a repeat in the same piece I’m working on that I mentioned up above, but now I think I will.


Yes, I do remember well, that we talked about this. For me the repeats mostly are very important because they are a certain chance, to say the same with other words, to bring change and interesting lightings and colours to the musical ideas.

To chapter 18 (The Deal): I found it very interesting, that Luc played the game with his dealer and his client "like Molière". That´s very French, this manner, and very clever. I find it likewise, that Luc takes the risc and trusts the dealer.

To chapter 19 (Beethovens piano): That was a very interesting and deep view into the piano-world of 18th and 19th century. I still have played on a "Tafelklavier" (virginal) of 18th century. It was in a castle and I asked, if I might play on it. The tone was really bell-like and soft and much more silent then the tone of our pianos of today. I also have some recordings of Jörg Demus, who plays on the Viennese piano of Beethoven, built by Graf in the 1820th. It was his last piano he possessed. I think, this one still has a metal frame, but it sounds very differently from todays pianos, its tone is much more thinner and its registers are much more imbalanced.
It´s a pity, that the art of wood is "out of the world, in which we live today", like it´s said in the novel. I fear in 200 years or so wooden pianos could be out of the world like this art of 18th century is still today. May be in 200 years there only will be electronic pianos or "virtual pianos". What do you think?

I´m going to chapter 20 right now! Hope I´ll finish it this evening! I really like this book very much!

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IMHO, I think piano continues to become a more specialized and eccentricism. Especially here in the states, it may be different in the old world.

I have two pianos ... an upright baldwin and an electric Yamaha. The Baldwin is really a pitiful instrument ... icky sound, uneven action, ugly resonance with pedal. Many times I enjoy the electric more because of how nice it is to play: action is always the same and always in tune. Although the tone produced many times is just lacking .... most especially is this noticeable after playing on a real piano. But, I would think, most non-musicians really wouldn't notice ... or that it would even make that much of a difference.

I've been most affected in the book at the beautiful descriptions of the roundness, fullness of tone from the pianos. Also, the difference in sound ... I really, really want a piano!!!!

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There are some piano manufacturers that are using plastic for certain parts inside the piano. I wonder if more plastic will be used in the future. Do you think they could make a sound board out of plastic? Or what about metal? Maybe that would produce too loud of a sound?

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Pianolady wrote:
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There are some piano manufacturers that are using plastic for certain parts inside the piano.I wonder if more plastic will be used in the future. Do you think they could make a sound board out of plastic? Or what about metal? Maybe that would produce too loud of a sound?


I´m quite sure, that this is impossible both plastic and metal, because the sound would be to tinny and loud.
I could imagine (with a bit science-fiction-fantasy), that in 50 to 100 years or so the holograms will be as well developed, that it will be possible to play on a "hologram-piano", which is virtual and not real. Poor men of the future, what will they do, if there will be an outage? :wink: :lol:

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Last edited by musicusblau on Sat May 02, 2009 11:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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IMHO, I think piano continues to become a more specialized and eccentricism. Especially here in the states, it may be different in the old world.


I think, here in Germany the piano is still very prevalent, but digital pianos respective e-pianos capture the front more and more. I think, this is mirrored also on PS, isn´t it?

An accoustic natural piano can´t be compared with an e-piano, because it´s sound has more soul and naturalness, even you regard the more superficial "advantages" of an e-piano like always to be in the right tuning, to have a regular action and so on. These "advantages" do not replace the soul, character and naturalness of the sound of a real piano, because bad tuning and bad action can easily be corrected by a piano manufacturer respective tuner. :wink:

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Last edited by musicusblau on Sat May 02, 2009 11:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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