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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 8:23 pm 
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[quote="musical-md"][quote="techneut"][quote="RSPIll"]I'll work on Saint-Saens.[/quote]
Great, thanks ![/quote]
Ok, then I won't.[/quote]

Please disregard. I just noted that the post was quite dated. I will do S-S.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 8:53 pm 
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[quote="richard66"]I am still working on the others (Janacek, Vaughan Williams and Henrique Oswald).[/quote]

BTW, Richard, I'd volunteered and have written a bio for Janacek... all I need to do is polish it up, fact-check it, and post it here. Just thought I'd speak up so we don't end up with two bios. :D


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 9:52 pm 
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[quote="techneut"]Wow that's a pretty hefty bio Richard 8)
Good stuff, thanks for that. I have put it on the site. Great when members take the trouble to
contribute to the site content.

Most bios contain a brief overview of a composer's oeuvre (not just the piano works).
I don't see that here as such, you only mention a couple of works. I'm not saying you need to
change this one, but it could be something to keep in mind.[/quote]

My! That is so! And I was going to talk about his symphonies and some of his other works (which I have on CD). I could write something about them, that is no problem. Would you like me to do that?

Well, Sarah, if you have Janacek ready there is little use in my starting it, is there? It is that Monica mentioned it was to be done.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 9:55 pm 
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richard66 wrote:
My! That is so! And I was going to talk about his symphonies and some of his other works (which I have on CD). I could write something about them, that is no problem. Would you like me to do that?

Would be nice, and doing the composer a favor. Don't make the bio too big, though. I'd suggest pruning the whole a bit afterwards.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:12 am 
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Sorry if there was some confusion. Sarah should do the Janecek since she claimed it in january. Thank you, both! :)

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 6:39 pm 
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Here, Chris, I have edited the biography. I was a bit confused by my CDs, as I thought I had two symphonies, but it seems he only wrote one... And my CDs are not too enlightening, as they were gifts from someone who copied them from I do not know which source and there is nothing whatsoever written on the booklet. There is no booklet, by the way.

Alberto Nepomuceno (1864-1920)
Though later overshadowed by Heitor Villa Lobos, Alberto Nepomuceno was the founder of the Brazilian national school.
He was born in Fortaleza, capital of the north-eastern state of Ceará, in Brazil. He began his musical studies with his father, Víctor Augusto, a violinist and the organist of the Cathedral of Fortaleza. In 1872 his family moved to Recife capital of Pernambuco, where he continued his studies with his father until the latter’s death in 1880. In 1882 he became the director of the Recife Carlos Gomes Club and the following year was active as a violinist at the Santa Isabel Theatre. In 1884 he returned to Ceará and in 1885 moved to Rio de Janeiro, where he was active as a pianist at the Beethoven Club and formed a duo with the ’cellist Frederico Nascimento. In 1886 he took up his duties as teacher at the Beethoven Club while still learning harmony.
In 1888 he played his Dança de Negros (Negro Dance) at the Iracema Club in Fortaleza, a piece with local colour, that was later re-elaborated, orchestrated and, renamed, Batuque it became the fourth and last movement of the Série Brasileira.
In August of the same year he left for Rome to further his studies, thanks to an official award given him by the Brazilian government. He enrolled at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia. He was able to continue his studies and in 1890 he entered the Akademische Meister Schulle in Berlin. He soon transferred to the Stern Conservatoire, graduating in 1894 with a concert by the Berlin Philharmonic, where he conducted his Scherzo for Orchestra and his Suite Antiga for strings.
It was in Berlin in 1891 that he met Walborg Rendtler Bang, a pupil of Edvard Grieg, whom he married two years later in Christiania (Oslo). The couple stayed for a time in Troldhaugen, Grieg’s country house. Grieg was to prove a major influence both musically and as a model for Nepomuceno’s establishing of a Brazilian national school. His Suite Antiga (Suite in the Ancient Style), which he wrote in Troldhaugen in 1893, is clearly fashioned after Grieg’s Suite from Holberg’s Time. Grieg enjoyed the work so much that he insisted it be published by his own publisher, Peters.
Another work from his Berlin period is His String Quartet No.3, written in 1890 and subtitled “Brazilian”, is one of the earliest attempts to weave Brazilian folklore into a work cast in classical forms. The same year saw the writing of his Piano Sonata in f minor, the first work in this form to be written by a Brazilian and where his fondness for Brahms is evident.
In 1894 he travelled to Paris to study the organ at the Schola Cantorum and was able to met Saint-Saëns and D’Indy.
The Following year the couple was back in Brazil, and he became organ teacher at the Instituto Nacional de Música in Rio de Janeiro. Between 1896 and 1906 he was active at the Popular Concert Association, promoting Brazilian composers. Considering that at the time Portuguese was not considered appropriate for opera or art song, it took some courage on his part to present a series of songs written in the vernacular at the Instituto Nacional the same year and he was much criticised for this.
In 1900 he met Mahler in Vienna and discussed the staging of his opera Artemis, but nothing came of this. In 1910 he conducted concerts of Brazilian music, including some of his compositions, in Brussels, Geneva and Paris. It was in the latter he met and became a friend of Debussy.
In 1913 his opera Abul was staged in Rome.
Walborg and Alberto had four daughters, one of which, Sigrid, who was born with only her left hand. It was for her he wrote two sets of pieces: the 1906 Five Small Pieces, which were premièred by her at a school concert in 1907, and two nocturnes, which she played in concert in 1919.
He resigned his position at the Instituto Nacional de Música in 1916, devoting the last fours years of his life to composition and to promoting younger composers, including Villa-Lobos.
In 1920 fragments of his unfinished opera O Guarujá was presented by the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by Richard Strauss.
Besides the works mentioned above, he wrote a Symphony in g minor, a romantic work, as well as a serenade for strings, in “the ancient style” but with Brazilian elements and many song cycles.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2011 5:25 am 
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I have replaced the bio.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2011 3:20 pm 
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Thank you, Monica!

This is a bit embarassing for me, but it seems I sent a draft instead of the final version. There are several howlers there. Could I please (with surgar!) ask you for the very last time to change it?

I am sorry for this.

Alberto Nepomuceno (1864-1920)
Though later overshadowed by Heitor Villa Lobos, Alberto Nepomuceno was the founder of the Brazilian national school.
He was born in Fortaleza, capital of the north-eastern state of Ceará, in Brazil. He began his musical studies with his father, a violinist and organist at the Fortaleza Cathedral. In 1872 his family moved to Recife capital of Pernambuco, where he continued his studies with his father until the latter’s death in 1880. In 1882 he became the director of the Recife Carlos Gomes Club and the following year was active as a violinist at the Santa Isabel Theatre. In 1884 he returned to Ceará and in 1885 moved to Rio de Janeiro, where he was active as a pianist at the Beethoven Club and formed a duo with the ’cellist Frederico Nascimento. In 1886 he took up his duties as teacher at the Beethoven Club while still learning harmony.
In 1888 he played his Dança de Negros (Negro Dance) at the Iracema Club in Fortaleza, a piece with local colour that was later re-elaborated, orchestrated and renamed Batuque, becoming the fourth and last movement of the Série Brasileira.
In August of the same year he left for Rome to further his studies, thanks to an official award given him by the Brazilian government. He enrolled at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia and in 1890 moved to Berlin, entering the Akademische Meister Schulle. He then transferred to the Stern Conservatoire, graduating in 1894 with a concert by the Berlin Philharmonic, where he conducted his Scherzo for Orchestra and his Suite Antiga for strings.
It was in Berlin in 1891 that he met Walborg Rendtler Bang, a pupil of Edvard Grieg, whom he married two years later in Christiania (Oslo). The couple stayed for a time in Troldhaugen, Grieg’s country house. Grieg was to prove a major influence both musically and as a model for Nepomuceno’s establishing of a Brazilian national school. His Suite Antiga (Suite in the Ancient Style), which he wrote in Troldhaugen in 1893, is clearly fashioned after Grieg’s Suite from Holberg’s Time. Grieg enjoyed the work so much that he insisted it be published by his own publisher, Peters.
Another work from his Berlin period, His String Quartet No.3, written in 1890 and subtitled “Brazilian”, is one of the earliest attempts to weave Brazilian folklore into a work cast in classical forms. The same year saw the writing of his Piano Sonata in f minor, the first work in this form to be written by a Brazilian and where his fondness for Brahms is evident.
In 1894 he travelled to Paris to study the organ at the Schola Cantorum and was able to met Saint-Saëns and D’Indy.
The Following year the couple was back in Brazil, and he became organ teacher at the Instituto Nacional de Música in Rio de Janeiro. Between 1896 and 1906 he was active at the Popular Concert Association, promoting Brazilian composers. Considering that at the time Portuguese was not thought appropriate for opera or art song, it took some courage on his part to present a series of songs written in the vernacular at the Instituto Nacional the same year and he was much criticised for this.
In 1900 he met Mahler in Vienna and discussed the staging of his opera Arthemis, but nothing came of this. In 1910 he conducted concerts of Brazilian music, including some of his compositions, in Brussels, Geneva and Paris. It was in the latter city he met and became a friend of Debussy.
In 1913 his opera Abul was staged in Rome.
One of Walborg and Alberto’s daughters, Sigrid, was born with only her left hand. It was for her he wrote two sets of pieces: the 1906 Five Small Pieces, which were premièred by her at a school concert in 1907, and two nocturnes, which she played in concert in 1919.
He resigned his position at the Instituto Nacional de Música in 1916, devoting the last fours years of his life to composition and to promoting younger composers, including Villa-Lobos.
In 1920 the overture to his unfinished opera O Guarujá was presented by the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by Richard Strauss.
Besides the works mentioned above, he wrote a Symphony in g minor, a romantic work, as well as a serenade for strings, in “the ancient style” but with Brazilian elements.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2011 3:39 pm 
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No problem. I have removed a couple more clonkers in this version, and put it up.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 3:08 pm 
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[quote="techneut"]No problem. I have removed a couple more clonkers in this version, and put it up.[/quote]

??? Other bloomers? I really need to ask an expert team to revise anything I write in future.

I am now working on Oswald, but I am afraid he is not half as interesting as Nepomuceno.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 3:30 pm 
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richard66 wrote:
??? Other bloomers?

Only nitpicking stuff, really. Just compare the text on the site to your posting.

richard66 wrote:
I really need to ask an expert team to revise anything I write in future.

That is what you have admins for. I'll go over it anyway, and any typo will catch my eye (much as any wrong note catches my ear :P )

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2011 6:22 pm 
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I have finished Oswald's biography. Contrary to what I thought, he had an intersting life too and, though I dod use the scissors a lot, I am afraid it might still be somewhat long. It was a very good occasion to become acquainted with his work, though it is hard to come by. I hope there are no howlers here!

Here it is:

HENRIQUE OSWALD
(1852 - 1931)

Though considered a Brazilian composer, Oswald was of European stock and spent the better part of his life in Europe, his music fitting perfectly into the Franco-German Romantic tradition.

He was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1852, the son of a Swiss-German father (originally Oshwald) and of a mother from Leghorn, Italy. Both were musicians, his mother being the child’s first teacher.

Around 1853 his father went to Sao Paulo, initially to sell beer, being later joined by his wife and child. The latter travelled in a ship that was transporting gunpowder. Halfway through the journey, a fire breaking out on board, all passengers were evacuated to a nearby island. The explosions were to remain etched in Henrique’s memory for the rest of his life.

The father switched in 1857 to pianos instead. These were to become the child’s toys and by the age of six he was already giving concerts. Realising their son’s future lay in music and that Brazil could not offer him a proper musical education, his parents decided he continue his studies in Europe. Accordingly he left Brazil, together with his mother in 1868, being joined by the father some time later. The original plan had been to entrust the child to von Bülow, but they decided to settle in Florence, at the time capital of Italy.

While still studying he was to make the acquaintance of Liszt.

In 1881 he married an Italian singer and settled into the career of a teacher at a Florentine musical institute.

In 1896 he went to Brazil on tour, being very well received by the critics, an event that encouraged him to return many other times. In 1889 he had the opportunity to play with Saint-Saëns, who at the time was also in Brazil.

In 1900 he was nominated Brazilian Chancellor at The Hague, being soon after transferred to Florence.

In 1902 the French newspaper Le Figaro organised a composition competition which was won by Oswald’s Il Neige! (It Is Snowing!). The jury included Fauré and Saint-Saëns.

In 1903 Oswald returned to Brazil, being nominated director of the Instituto Nacional de Música by the Brazilian president. No born administrator and feeling he could no longer compose, he resigned after three years, but remained active as a teacher, while still retuning regularly to Europe.

In 1911, the year of his sixtieth birthday, he and his family settled in Rio de Janeiro. For the next twenty years he taught, while his house became an important musical centre for chamber music.

He was to maintain friendships with Rebikov - director of the Moscow Conservatoire - as well as with Arthur Rubinstein, Milhaud – who was for a time in Brazil as a member of the French diplomatic corps - Claudel, Moszkowski, Pierné and Isidor Philipp. He played host to Respighi when the latter visited Brazil on honeymoon.

His son Alfredo’s - a pianist, composer (and, following a stroke which paralysed his left side, one of the few composers to write music for the right hand) and performer of his father’s work in the United States – taking religious orders spurred Oswald to compose music for the Church.

Just days before his death he was awarded the Legion d’Honneur by the French government, a decoration he received posthumously.

He composed ,mostly for the piano, but besides a symphony and two concerti, one for piano and one for violin, he wrote three operas, copious and high quality chamber music and a cappella choral works of rare loveliness.

More information (in Portuguese) on the composer can be found at: http://www.oswald.com.br/site2010/hoswald1.htm


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2011 6:24 pm 
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I have a picture of his too. How can I send it?


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2011 7:59 pm 
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Thanks Richard ! You can attach the picture right here. Or mail it to me.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2011 10:07 am 
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Ok, the Oswald bio is up, including the pic you sent me. Thanks again !

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2011 2:23 pm 
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In the end it does not seem so long after all. I suppose removng some paragraph marks did the trick! I meant to edit the picture, but you have done it exaclty how I would have done it, so thank you! Just a question, why did you change the spellings of organise and realise to organize and realize?

I mention Rebikov and what should happen the very same day? I find a score written by Rebikov and dedicated to Oswald!

I shall now go to work on Vaughan Williams.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2011 3:46 pm 
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richard66 wrote:
In the end it does not seem so long after all. I suppose removng some paragraph marks did the trick! I meant to edit the picture, but you have done it exaclty how I would have done it, so thank you! Just a question, why did you change the spellings of organise and realise to organize and realize?

Because my browser's spelling checker suggested so :)
But I was assuming my browser would use the European locale (because it knows damn well where I live). Not so apparently :x
So I've changed it the wrong way....

richard66 wrote:
I mention Rebikov and what should happen the very same day? I find a score written by Rebikov and dedicated to Oswald!

You'll have to record that now. I've never heard anything by Rebikov, shame on me.

richard66 wrote:
I shall now go to work on Vaughan Williams.

Cool ! One of my favorite composers. Be sure to mention his mighty symphonies and other symphonic and choral works.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2011 5:10 pm 
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I have lots of things I want to record, but at present... We have workmen drilling on the ground floor and my daughter is apt to go behind the piano and start singing or comes or comes and plays. While this might be fun, I am sure you will not put any such recordings up and I will not blame you either.

Of course, the nine symphonies and the g mass, which I enjoy a lot, will get mentioned!


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 5:20 pm 
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May I be a nity-picker too, Chris? Could you change one little word on first paragraph of the biography of Oswald?

Where it reads:

Though considered a Brazilian composer, Oswald was of European stock and spent the better part of his life in Europe, his music fitting perfectly into the Franco-German Romantic tradition. He was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1852, the son of a Swiss-German father (originally Oshwald) and of a mother from Leghorn, ITALY. Both were musicians, his mother being the child’s first teacher.

could it read:


Though considered a Brazilian composer, Oswald was of European stock and spent the better part of his life in Europe, his music fitting perfectly into the Franco-German Romantic tradition. He was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1852, the son of a Swiss-German father (originally Oshwald) and of a mother from Leghorn, TUSCANY. Both were musicians, his mother being the child’s first teacher.

?

In fact, when the mother was born Tuscany was a sovereign state.

Is anyone working on Stanchinsky?


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 7:55 pm 
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Ah sure, it is important that we be politically and historically correct :D
I have also taken the liberty to replace Leghorn by Livorno. Or is there good reason to use the non-Italian name ?

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:09 pm 
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Well, Leghorn is the name of the city in English and it does make me look as if I did not know that. The same as Isay The Hague and not Den Haag and Florence and not Firenze.

Look at it this way: when a place is important it has names in different languages and Leghorn is historically very important.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:21 pm 
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From Wikipedia:

Livorno About this sound listen (help·info) (Italian pronunciation: [liˈvorno]),

traditionally called Leghorn (English pronunciation: /ˈlɛɡhɔrn/) in English,


is a port city on the Ligurian Sea on the western edge of Tuscany, Italy. It is the capital of the Province of Livorno, having a population of approximately 160,000 residents in 2009. The second-largest port on the western coast of Italy, Livorno supports substantial cruise-ship tourism to Florence and other destinations in Tuscany and Umbria.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 8:26 am 
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Ok, I may as well use both names, for those who may not know that Leghorn and Livorno are the same place.
I thought actually it was the German name :oops:

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 8:40 am 
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I once worked for an import-export company which shipped thriught that very city. All my e-mails went out saying "Leghorn". I realise this is not PC, but while I do do my best to be historically correct and I never knowingly wish to give offense I do not care a hoot for being politically correct. I shall probably end up being shot one of these days for it.

As I asked befere, is anyone working on Stanchinsky's biography?


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 8:41 am 
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THROUGH I meant!


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 8:43 am 
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richard66 wrote:
As I asked befere, is anyone working on Stanchinsky's biography?

I think you can safely assume nobody is.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 2:36 pm 
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I will do it. Expect it later on.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 5:47 pm 
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Here it is:

Alexey Stanchinsky (1888-1914)

Alexey Vladimirovich Stanchinsky was born in Obolsounovo a small town in the Governorate of Vladimir.

He began his studies early and at the age of six he was already composing. In 1899 his family moved to Logachevo, near Smolensk, where the child was exposed to folk songs, possibly the very same ones that had inspired Glinka many decades before. From 1904 Stanchinsky visited Moscow regularly, being a private pupil of Josef Lhévinne while taking composition classes with Gretchaninov. It was the latter who introduced the boy to Taneyev. In 1907 he entered his composition classes at the Moscow Conservatoire.

The death in 1908 of Vladimir Stanchinsky, the young man’s father, was to have a profound impact on his mental health, being confined to a lunatic’s asylum for a year.

Though pronounced incurable he made a comeback and by 1910 was collecting folk songs in the vicinity of Smolensk.

In 1914 he gave his only recital, which was very well received by the critics, who saw in him the makings of a great composer, a promise which was to remain unfulfilled: later in the year he was found dead near a stream at a friend’s family’s estate, a death that up to now remains unexplained.

Almost all his music, apart from a song cycle after poems by Robert Burns and some chamber works, all his music was written for the piano. None of these were published during his lifetime, the fist editions dating from the 1930s.

His main influence was Skryabin, to whom he owes the use of expanded tonality, though he never quite arrived at the latter’s near atonality, leaving, for example, a prelude in the Lydian mode. He wrote three piano sonatas (the earlier one in one movement), etudes, preludes, Mazurkas and a Nocturne, besides a piano trio.

Eddy will like this one: Lhévinne was Stanchinsky's teacher!


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 8:41 pm 
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While being grateful for any missing biographies being provided by members, I find that I'm evaluating them much like I evaluate recordings :roll:
Maybe it should not be like that.... but quality of writing is as important as quality of playing.
Not that this is bad, but I'd like you to re-read it and correct some issues like duplicate words and missing punctuation.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 9:23 pm 
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Indeed. I write the phrase and it is good. Then I change something and there... Duplicate words. I shall look into this.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 9:34 pm 
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See if this is better:

Alexey Stanchinsky (1888-1914)

Alexey Vladimirovich Stanchinsky was born in Obolsounovo, a small town in the Governorate of Vladimir.

He began his studies early and at the age of six he was already composing. In 1899 his family moved to Logachevo, near Smolensk, where the child was exposed to folk songs, possibly the very same ones that had inspired Glinka many decades before. From 1904 Stanchinsky visited Moscow regularly, being a private pupil of Josef Lhévinne, while taking composition classes with Gretchaninov. It was the latter who introduced the boy to Taneyev. In 1907 he entered his composition classes at the Moscow Conservatoire.

The death in 1908 of Vladimir Stanchinsky, the young man’s father, was to have a profound impact on his mental health and he was confined to a lunatic asylum for a year.

Even though he was pronounced incurable, he made a comeback and by 1910 was collecting folk songs in the vicinity of Smolensk.

In 1914 he gave his only recital, which was very well received by the critics, who saw in him the makings of a great composer, a promise which was to remain unfulfilled for later in the year he was found dead near a stream at a friend’s family estate, a death that up to now remains unexplained.

Almost all his music, apart from a song cycle after poems by Robert Burns and some chamber works, was written for the piano. None of these were published during his lifetime, the fist editions dating from the 1930s.

His main influence was Skryabin, to whom he owes the use of expanded tonality, though he never quite arrived at the latter’s near atonality. He also explored modal harmonies, leaving, for example, a prelude in the Lydian mode. He wrote three piano sonatas (the earlier one in one movement), études, preludes, Mazurkas and a Nocturne, as well as a piano trio.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 1:15 pm 
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Thanks Richard, this version looks fine to me. Only that I would prefer not writing Skryabin, but Scriabin as is the norm here.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 2:26 pm 
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As you wish! There are so many ways of tranliterating Russian names that one gets lost. I for myself transliterate the Russian letter ya in three different ways: ia, ya and ja, so. do follow the norm.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 10:55 am 
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Have you decided against this last biography?


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 11:00 am 
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richard66 wrote:
Have you decided against this last biography?

Hell no, I just did not get around to putting it on the site yet. Will make note to self to do so.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 4:20 pm 
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all right, then: I have changed the spelling of SCRIABIN, then. This is the only change and it reflects your wishes.


Alexey Stanchinsky (1888-1914)

Alexey Vladimirovich Stanchinsky was born in Obolsounovo, a small town in the Governorate of Vladimir.

He began his studies early and at the age of six he was already composing. In 1899 his family moved to Logachevo, near Smolensk, where the child was exposed to folk songs, possibly the very same ones that had inspired Glinka many decades before. From 1904 Stanchinsky visited Moscow regularly, being a private pupil of Josef Lhévinne, while taking composition classes with Gretchaninov. It was the latter who introduced the boy to Taneyev. In 1907 he entered his composition classes at the Moscow Conservatoire.

The death in 1908 of Vladimir Stanchinsky, the young man’s father, was to have a profound impact on his mental health and he was confined to a lunatic asylum for a year.

Even though he was pronounced incurable, he made a comeback and by 1910 was collecting folk songs in the vicinity of Smolensk.

In 1914 he gave his only recital, which was very well received by the critics, who saw in him the makings of a great composer, a promise which was to remain unfulfilled for later in the year he was found dead near a stream at a friend’s family estate, a death that up to now remains unexplained.

Almost all his music, apart from a song cycle after poems by Robert Burns and some chamber works, was written for the piano. None of these were published during his lifetime, the fist editions dating from the 1930s.

His main influence was Scriabin, to whom he owes the use of expanded tonality, though he never quite arrived at the latter’s near atonality. He also explored modal harmonies, leaving, for example, a prelude in the Lydian mode. He wrote three piano sonatas (the earlier one in one movement), études, preludes, Mazurkas and a Nocturne, as well as a piano trio.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 4:23 pm 
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Richard, you did not have to re-post the bio for that. I would have changed it anyway.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 4:36 pm 
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Just making your work easier.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 5:25 pm 
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Much appreciated, thanks. The bio is online now.

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 5:53 pm 
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But not signed...


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 7:48 pm 
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Right.. it is now

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 7:59 pm 
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Okay, here's the bio I came up with for Janacek. Thank you for your patience... I'm sorry it took me so long! Any criticism is welcome.

By the way, I had italicized the proper names of the operas, piano cycles, etc. in my Word document, but I can't seem to find an "italics" button on the reply setup. Maybe I'm missing something?





Born on July 3, 1854 in Hukvaldy, Moravia, Leoš Janáček showed musical promise very early in life. His talent first manifested itself in vocal ability; the young boy recieved his first studies in choral singing at the Abbey of St. Thomas in Brno, studying under the tutelage of Pavel Křížkovský. While there he also learned to play the piano and organ. When Janáček was 20 years old he entered the Prague organ school. Although suffering extreme poverty, Janáček managed to make the most of his studies underneath František Skuherský and František Blažek. He graduated with honors in 1875 in spite of being nearly expulsed from the school for a published criticism of one of his teacher's performances. Shortly thereafter Janáček began teaching privately and at Berno's Teachers Institute.

Though pleased with his position at the Institute, Janáček soon desired to acquire more musical training. After several months at Leipzic Conservatory Janáček transferred to Vienna Conservatory. He only stayed two months, however, due to criticism of his composition and piano performance styles. In Brno again, Janáček settled down and married one of his former students, Zdenka Schulzová, and took an appointment as director of the Brno organ school. This position enabled Janáček to begin to compose more systematically, as well as begin to become more involved in music criticism. During this period, too, the young man became fascinated with folk melodies and began to weave them into his work.

In the new century, fresh compositions continued to flow from Janáček's pen. His sacred composition Ave Maria and the popular piano cycle On an Overgrown Path were two of the works from this era of his career. Some of these works developed as a result of sorrow in Janáček's life. He and his wife had already lost a son in 1890; to compound his sorrow, in 1902 his beloved daughter Olga became seriously ill. In 1903 she died. Janáček expressed his deep grief through composing his noted opera Jenůfa.

After only one performance of Jenůfa in his hometown, Janacek was unable to stage any further performances of his opera. Grieved, exhaused, and dejected, Janáček journeyed to the Luhačovice spa to recover his strength and compositional inspiration. He eventually found his verve again and set to work on a set of notable choral, chamber, and orchestral works, as well as several operas. In this surge of productivity, Janáček received great encouragement; his opera Jenůfa was performed in Prague's National Theatre to enthusiastic audience members and critics alike. Finally, Janáček had recieved notice and acclaim.

This was also a time of new professional and personal relationships. In 1916 Janáček became associated with Max Brod, a critic, dramatist, and translator. Janáček also met a new love, singer Gabriela Horváthová. Upon hearing about the relationship, Janáček's wife Zdenka attemped suicide and "informally divorced" her husband. A year later, Janáček met a very young married woman, Kamila Stösslová, whom he passionately and obsessively loved and corresponded with until his death. The woman provided inspiration for a book and many musical works.

In 1920, Janáček retired from his teaching position at the Brno Conservatory. However, he continued to teach privately until 1925. He still kept his pen busy; in the autumn of his life, he produced some of his best works, like the Sinfonietta and Glagolitic Mass. In 1926 he traveled to England, greeted by a wam welcome and many London performances of his works, which led to more international exposure for the composer.

As Janáček neared the end of his life, he composed two last masterpieces: the operatic work The House of the Dead, and his "manifesto on love," the "Intimate Letters" string quartet. On a trip to Štramberk with Kamila and her son Otto, Janáček received a chill and fell ill with pneumonia. He breathed his last on August 12, 1928 at Ostrava. He was laid to rest in the Field of Honour at the Central Cemetery in Brno.

Janáček's musical legacy is extensive. Arguably his best works lay in the operatic medium: Jenůfa, of course, as well as Káťa Kabanová, The Cunning Little Vixen, The Makropulos Affair, and From the House of the Dead. His two string quartets are standard repertory in chamber music. The Sinfonietta, the Glagolitic Mass, and the Tara Bulba rahpsody are other well-known works of Janáček. While Janáček wrote relatively few piano works, the two books of On an Overgrown Path, the I. X. 1905 piano sonata, and the cycle In the Mists remain beloved works in the pianists' repertoire.


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 11:02 pm 
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Are there any more composers in need of a bio??

Scott


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 12:35 am 
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@Sarah - thank you very much for the Janacek bio. I will put it up onto the site later tonight. Regarding your italicized words, IIRC, only administrators have those text options and editing button up here in the Announcements forum. Don't ask me why...
I will italicize the words you wanted to be italicized.

@Scott - yes, we still have some bios left, but at least now it's getting down to a respectable number of only six!

They are:

-Bowen
-Lutoslawski
-Martinu
-Mayerl
-Respighi
-Warlock

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 3:07 am 
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Ok, Sarah, the bio is up. It's very nice - I did just a little bit of editing. And I'm very sorry and embarrassed to ask you this, but I've forgotten your last name.... :oops:

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 4:48 am 
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I'll work on Respighi after the weekend. I'm playing for our high school production of "Oklahoma!" which will be over tomorrow so after a Sunday of Valium and Jim Beam, I'll have time.

Scott


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 5:04 am 
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Ooooklahoma where the wind comes sweepin' down the plain...(great, now that's in my head and I'm about to go to bed. :roll: :) )

Have fun playing the show, Curly, I mean Scott. :lol: I'll be be looking for the Respighi bio soon. (fun for me, because I'm learning things from you and Sarah about certain composers)

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 9:18 am 
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Thanks for this bio Sarah, good work. I've added the last name (but no link as you don't have a page on PS).

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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 2:43 pm 
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[quote="pianolady"]Ooooklahoma where the wind comes sweepin' down the plain...(great, now that's in my head and I'm about to go to bed. :roll: :) )

Have fun playing the show, Curly, I mean Scott. :lol: I'll be be looking for the Respighi bio soon. (fun for me, because I'm learning things from you and Sarah about certain composers)[/quote]

Good, I'm glad I put that in your head. Maybe it can drive you crazy (or crazier) like it has me. I can't get rid of "It's a Scandal" and "Many a New Day" (not necessarily my favorite songs but ones that we had to work on most with the kids).

Scott


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 Post subject: Re: Composer biographies
PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 5:11 pm 
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I am now working on Waughan Williams. If, by the time I finish no one has claimed them, I will do Bowen and Warlock.


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